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Richard H Melton

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NEWS
October 20, 1987
President Reagan has selected a career diplomat, Richard H. Melton, 52, as the next ambassador to Nicaragua, but the Sandinista government is delaying approval of the nomination, Administration officials said. Officials said there has been no explanation by Managua for the delay. Some congressional conservatives oppose naming a replacement for Harry E. Bergold Jr., who left Managua several months ago, because of the conflict between the Marxist Sandinista government and U.S.
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NEWS
October 20, 1987
President Reagan has selected a career diplomat, Richard H. Melton, 52, as the next ambassador to Nicaragua, but the Sandinista government is delaying approval of the nomination, Administration officials said. Officials said there has been no explanation by Managua for the delay. Some congressional conservatives oppose naming a replacement for Harry E. Bergold Jr., who left Managua several months ago, because of the conflict between the Marxist Sandinista government and U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1988
President Reagan's war against Nicaragua is winding down as his surrogate army of Contra fighters retreats into Honduras. But diplomatic relations between Nicaragua and the United States are still strained and could even be broken off unless both governments move more rapidly to replace the diplomats assigned to each other's capitals. This diplomatic impasse developed in July, when the Sandinistas expelled U.S. Ambassador Richard H.
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | Associated Press
President Daniel Ortega, speaking at the ninth anniversary of his leftist government, said today that Nicaragua has been socialist since 1979. "There were expectations on this July 19 that we were going to declare ourselves socialists," the president, wearing a plaid cowboy shirt, said in the nationally broadcast speech. "They haven't understood yet that we are socialists, and there's (been) socialism in Nicaragua since 1979."
OPINION
July 31, 1988
President Reagan is trying to rekindle his war against Nicaragua, undeterred by the failure of six years of U.S.-sponsored violence in that small country to improve an already miserable situation. With only six months left of the Reagan presidency, Congress must keep him in check to prevent further damage to U.S. relations with Nicaragua and the rest of Latin America. Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) has introduced a bill to renew military aid to the Nicaraguan rebels, the Contras.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua on Thursday canceled a scheduled visit to the United States after the Reagan Administration failed to grant entry visas in time to half of the members of his official delegation. Ortega had planned to travel from Managua on Saturday with a 60-member entourage to address the U.N. General Assembly in New York and the Organization of American States in Washington next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987 | RICHARD A. NUCCIO, Richard A. Nuccio is the director of Latin American and Caribbean programs at the Roosevelt Center in Washington. For the past year he has been traveling around the country conducting sessions of the center's educational (and apolitical) strategy "game" on Central America.
Oslo, Norway, Dec. 10--In his speech accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, Costa Rica's President Oscar Arias Sanchez implores the superpowers to "let Central Americans decide the future of Central America." Washington, Dec. 10--Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev suggests to President Reagan in a White House stroll that limits might be placed on Soviet military aid to Nicaragua if U.S. aid to the Contras is curtailed. Washington, Dec. 10--Maj.
NEWS
September 24, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of Nicaragua's civic opposition began a 72-hour fast Friday to call attention to a Sandinista government crackdown that they said is being abetted by House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.). Thirteen activists of the Nicaraguan Democratic Coordinator, the main anti-Sandinista coalition, gathered in their headquarters for the hunger protest after the government denied them authorization to lead a march Sunday through the streets of Managua.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After years of Contra war and the recent expulsion of each others' ambassadors, relations between Nicaragua and the United States could hardly be more dissonant. Then along came the good-vibes diplomacy of Clarence (Gatemouth) Brown. At a pair of free public concerts over the weekend, hundreds of Nicaraguans clapped and stomped away their wartime woes as the versatile guitarist from Louisiana and his four-man combo showed their mastery of blues, country, jazz, Cajun and bluegrass music.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams told congressional committees Tuesday that former White House aide Lt. Col. Oliver L. North once told him about "a big network" of private firms and bank accounts that aided Nicaragua's rebels, but he insisted that he never suspected it was run by North or anyone else in the Administration.
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