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Richard H Sander

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OPINION
November 1, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Stuart Taylor Jr. was in my law school class. Or, more accurately, I was in his law school class, since he graduated at the top of the class and I graduated. Now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, Taylor has co-written, with Richard H. Sander, a professor of law at UCLA, an influential book highly critical of affirmative action. I am hesitant to write about it, first because he is a friend I'd like to keep, and second, because the book is intimidating, both in its statistics and in its evident goodwill.
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OPINION
November 1, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Stuart Taylor Jr. was in my law school class. Or, more accurately, I was in his law school class, since he graduated at the top of the class and I graduated. Now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, Taylor has co-written, with Richard H. Sander, a professor of law at UCLA, an influential book highly critical of affirmative action. I am hesitant to write about it, first because he is a friend I'd like to keep, and second, because the book is intimidating, both in its statistics and in its evident goodwill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members may have thought they were making a groundbreaking social statement last year when they passed a "living wage" law, making city contractors pay their workers $8.50 an hour in wages and benefits. But a report commissioned by the City Council and an interview with the laws' leading proponent suggest that they have also wound up making a statement about the difficulty of forcing change: It's one thing to pass a law; quite another to get it enforced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Council members may have thought they were making a groundbreaking social statement last year when they passed a "living wage" law, making city contractors pay their workers $8.50 an hour in wages and benefits. But a report commissioned by the City Council and an interview with the laws' leading proponent suggest that they have also wound up making a statement about the difficulty of forcing change: It's one thing to pass a law; quite another to get it enforced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000
A business-sponsored study released Thursday suggests that Santa Monica's so-called living wage proposal would drive property values down, force hundreds of layoffs and drive away new business. At a meeting Thursday morning, UCLA law professor Richard H. Sander detailed the findings of a five-month study that a group of hotels paid him and three other professors $55,000 to conduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitterly contested proposal to boost pay and benefits for the minimum-wage employees of Los Angeles city contract holders and some other private firms won unanimous backing from key City Council committees Tuesday. The vote by the council's Personnel and Budget and Finance committees sent the long-debated proposal--dubbed the "living wage ordinance" by proponents--to the full City Council.
OPINION
September 30, 2007
Re "A mismatch effect?" Opinion, Sept. 26 Forcing a person into an environment that he or she is either not prepared for or incapable of surviving is not unlike selling a house to a person who cannot afford to pay the mortgage. But romantic fantasies are not nearly as problematic as are people with a hidden agenda. How can we solve a problem if we don't really want to solve the problem?
OPINION
September 17, 2008
Americans have been debating the fairness and efficacy of racial preferences in college and graduate school admissions for more than 30 years. Now a UCLA professor is seeking to test his hypothesis that affirmative action programs actually hurt the career prospects of minority law school graduates. But he has been hampered in his research by the indefensible failure of the State Bar of California to provide the statistics he needs. The professor, Richard H. Sander, has requested data about the performance of white and minority law school graduates on the bar examination, along with information about the schools they attended and their grades.
OPINION
September 26, 2007 | By Vikram Amar and Richard H. Sander
IMAGINE, FOR A MOMENT, that a program designed to aid disadvantaged students might, instead, be seriously undermining their performance. Imagine that the schools administering the programs were told that the programs might be having this boomerang effect -- but that no one investigated further because the programs were so popular and the prospect of change was so politically controversial. Now imagine that an agency had collected enough information on student performance that it might, by carefully studying or releasing the data, illuminate both the problem and the possible solutions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1999 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite being one of the most diverse metropolitan areas in the world, Greater Los Angeles remains a hotbed of racial and ethnic housing discrimination. Two recent studies of rental practices found that Latino landlords are discriminating against African Americans, and black landlords are discriminating against Latinos, at levels comparable to those practiced by whites against minority groups a decade ago.
OPINION
December 20, 2004 | Goodwin Liu, Goodwin Liu is an assistant professor of law at UC Berkeley's Boalt Hall.
Eighteen months ago, the Supreme Court found that affirmative action in law schools helps cultivate diverse leaders for a diverse society. Now, a new study by UCLA law professor and economist Richard H. Sander claims that the court was wrong on the facts. He argues that American law schools would produce more black lawyers by eliminating affirmative action than by preserving it.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Has Santa Monica, long regarded as a spawning ground for flaky notions, come up with another crazy idea? It's looking into lifting the legal minimum pay for several thousand workers in one section of the city to a relatively lofty $10.69 an hour and requiring their employers to provide health insurance. But this time around, Santa Monica might not be quite as off-the-wall as many people think. Its so-called living-wage proposal reflects a trend already gathering momentum nationally.
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