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Richard H Truly

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NEWS
April 3, 1989
President Bush is expected to name Navy Adm. Richard H. Truly to head NASA, Administration sources said, which would make him the first astronaut to head the space agency. Truly, associate administrator for spaceflight at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is expected to be nominated for the post this week, said officials, who declined to be identified. He would succeed James C. Fletcher, who retired from the post after holding it for more than two years.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Richard H. Truly, the former astronaut who brought the National Aeronautics and Space Administration back from catastrophe after the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, has resigned under pressure as head of the agency after a series of bitter disputes with White House officials over the future of the space program.
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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush turned Wednesday to Navy Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly, a veteran of two space shuttle flights, to take over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "This marks the first time in its distinguished history that NASA will be led by a hero of its own making, an astronaut who has been to space," Bush said at a White House ceremony at which he announced his plans to nominate Truly to succeed James C. Fletcher. Truly has been the agency's associate administrator for space flight since 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Acting on President Bush's charge to fly to the moon and Mars, NASA said last week that American astronauts could establish a lunar base by the first decade of the 21st Century and go to the red planet 10 years later.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Richard H. Truly, the former astronaut who brought the National Aeronautics and Space Administration back from catastrophe after the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, has resigned under pressure as head of the agency after a series of bitter disputes with White House officials over the future of the space program.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, charting a course for an American return to space exploration, Thursday challenged the nation to commit itself to a permanent manned presence in space and, in the next century, to send a manned spaceship to Mars. Speaking on the 20th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, Bush said the Apollo astronauts "left more than flags and footprints on the moon. They also left some unfinished business."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Acting on President Bush's charge to fly to the moon and Mars, NASA said last week that American astronauts could establish a lunar base by the first decade of the 21st Century and go to the red planet 10 years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989 | From United Press International
NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly on Thursday appointed Thomas (Jack) Lee to serve as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, where the shuttle main engine and booster programs are managed. Lee, 54, the deputy director of the space center, succeeds James Thompson Jr., who was recently chosen by President Bush to be NASA's deputy administrator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Senate committee approved Tuesday the nominations of Adm. James B. Busey to head the Federal Aviation Administration and Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly to head the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Both nominations approved by the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee now go to the full Senate.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | From United Press International
Acting NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly announced Tuesday that he has named Samuel Keller to the space agency's third-highest post of associate deputy administrator. Keller replaces Noel Hinners, who resigned with other NASA managers because of uncertainty over new ethics legislation that bars government managers from taking similar posts in private industry for up to two years. Keller has been deputy associate administrator for space science and application since December, 1977.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, charting a course for an American return to space exploration, Thursday challenged the nation to commit itself to a permanent manned presence in space and, in the next century, to send a manned spaceship to Mars. Speaking on the 20th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, Bush said the Apollo astronauts "left more than flags and footprints on the moon. They also left some unfinished business."
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush turned Wednesday to Navy Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly, a veteran of two space shuttle flights, to take over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "This marks the first time in its distinguished history that NASA will be led by a hero of its own making, an astronaut who has been to space," Bush said at a White House ceremony at which he announced his plans to nominate Truly to succeed James C. Fletcher. Truly has been the agency's associate administrator for space flight since 1986.
NEWS
April 3, 1989
President Bush is expected to name Navy Adm. Richard H. Truly to head NASA, Administration sources said, which would make him the first astronaut to head the space agency. Truly, associate administrator for spaceflight at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is expected to be nominated for the post this week, said officials, who declined to be identified. He would succeed James C. Fletcher, who retired from the post after holding it for more than two years.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Veteran NASA official Aaron Cohen was named to lead the agency until a successor is nominated and confirmed for departing administrator Richard H. Truly. Cohen, director of the Johnson Space Center in Houston since 1986, will be acting deputy administrator. Truly, who resigned last week under pressure, will leave April 1. Until then, Truly said, Cohen will assist him in day-to-day operations and will provide continuity until the top two agency positions are filled.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
William B. Lenoir announced his resignation as the head of NASA's manned flight activities, joining his boss in leaving the agency. Lenoir's resignation is effective May 4. Administrator Richard H. Truly leaves NASA today at the behest of the White House. There was no hint in NASA's announcement that Lenoir was leaving because Truly lost his job. Nor did it say what Lenoir will do. Their departures remove the two highest-ranking former astronauts from managing the agency.
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