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Richard Halliburton

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OPINION
April 12, 2014 | Scott Martelle
Reading is such an improbable idea -- a miracle, really. Yet simple squiggles on a page, arranged just so, can convey ideas that change the way we think or introduce to us characters we love for a lifetime. In celebration of reading -- and of this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- we asked four readers (who also happen to be writers) to celebrate books that mattered in their lives. The book was called "The Royal Road to Romance," and to a pre-adolescent boy with a fear of anything girlish, it sounded an awful lot like a bodice-ripper.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The fortress-like mansion of concrete and steel is perched high atop a bluff in South Laguna, practically concealed from view by other hillside estates. The private road to the old mansion, with a rise so steep that it threatens to flip cars end over end, discourages a closer look. Few people these days have cause to brave the dizzying drive. Half a century ago, however, the winding road leading to 31172 Ceanothus Drive carried a steady procession of curiosity-seekers.
OPINION
April 12, 2014 | Scott Martelle
Reading is such an improbable idea -- a miracle, really. Yet simple squiggles on a page, arranged just so, can convey ideas that change the way we think or introduce to us characters we love for a lifetime. In celebration of reading -- and of this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- we asked four readers (who also happen to be writers) to celebrate books that mattered in their lives. The book was called "The Royal Road to Romance," and to a pre-adolescent boy with a fear of anything girlish, it sounded an awful lot like a bodice-ripper.
TRAVEL
May 29, 2005
Regarding "So You Want to be a Travel Writer?" [Her World, May 22]: Never underestimate the influence of the travel writer. As a child I read "The Royal Road to Romance," by Richard Halliburton. More than any other writer, Halliburton instilled a taste of glamour, adventure and curiosity that inspires me to this day. Joseph A. Lea Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1989
Your recent article concerning the property in South Laguna formerly owned by Richard Halliburton ("South Laguna's Forgotten Giant," Sept. 3) brought back nostalgic memories. The reporter mentioned that Halliburton had swum the Dardanelles and crossed the Alps on an elephant. These two observations, made in such matter-of-fact fashion, do not describe the reasons for those adventures. Halliburton swam the Hellespont (Dardanelles) to repeat the legendary accomplishment of Leander according to the myth of Hero and Leander.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody, except maybe Stork Club owner Sherman Billingsley, seems to have really liked Walter Winchell. His nicknames included the louse that roared. But for decades, Winchell was one of the most powerful men in America, wielding his microphone and his newspaper column like whips. His celebrity gossip column was syndicated in 1,000 newspapers. And his voice, still heard on reruns of "The Untouchables" TV series, was more familiar than Franklin Delano Roosevelt's.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody, except Stork Club owner Sherman Billingsley, seems to have really liked Walter Winchell. His nicknames included the louse that roared. But for decades Winchell was one of the most powerful men in America, wielding his microphone and his newspaper column like whips. His celebrity gossip column was syndicated in a thousand newspapers. And his voice, still heard on reruns of "The Untouchables" TV series, was more familiar than Franklin Delano Roosevelt's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | DANA PARSONS
The Discovery Channel aired two programs this week about famous sunken ships, and that got me thinking about Al Enderle. To many Orange Countians, his is the family name behind the Enderle Center retail outlet in Tustin, but that makes him sound a lot more boring than he really is. This guy has searched for buried treasure. You could call him a retired adventurer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The fortress-like mansion of concrete and steel is perched high atop a bluff in South Laguna, practically concealed from view by other hillside estates. The private road to the old mansion, with a rise so steep that it threatens to flip cars end over end, discourages a closer look. Few people these days have cause to brave the dizzying drive. Half a century ago, however, the winding road leading to 31172 Ceanothus Drive carried a steady procession of curiosity-seekers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1990 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her mind, Debbie Shaffer can hear the final bell ringing at Hermosa Valley School and see her 11-year-old daughter, Michelle, starting the long walk home. At the office where she works as an executive secretary, the young mother fidgets and watches the clock for the next half-hour, the time it takes for the little blonde girl to phone and say she has reached home--safely. Only then will Shaffer relax.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1989 | BETH KLEID
William Alexander may be a millionaire, but he lives in a small house in the Hollywood Hills, drives an old Toyota station wagon and wears simple clothes. "I don't care for gilded luxuries," said the sprightly 81-year-old. "They don't do anything for me." His life is filled with other riches, for he is Los Angeles' patron-of-the-arts extraordinaire --a man who for 20 years has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars as well as countless hours to arts groups.
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