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Richard Henn

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
While audiences at the Laguna Beach Pageant of the Masters are looking at large-scale reproductions of famous artworks, they are listening to music that is largely the real thing. "Approximately 80% of the Pageant score is original," says composer Richard Henn. "The rest is in the public domain, but even that has to be adapted for the orchestra." Henn, 39, who also conducts the 27-member pageant orchestra, has worked with the show for the last eight seasons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When musician Richard Henn talks about the job he's had for each of the last 20 summers, he starts to sound like a surfer. It's the adrenaline rush, he says, that keeps him coming back time and again to his chosen spot in Laguna Beach. "What really turns me on is the process . . . that long, curvy, exciting pathway where I get to carry all the pieces through, from conception to completion," Henn said recently from his Malibu home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When musician Richard Henn talks about the job he's had for each of the last 20 summers, he starts to sound like a surfer. It's the adrenaline rush, he says, that keeps him coming back time and again to his chosen spot in Laguna Beach. "What really turns me on is the process . . . that long, curvy, exciting pathway where I get to carry all the pieces through, from conception to completion," Henn said recently from his Malibu home.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
While audiences at the Laguna Beach Pageant of the Masters are looking at large-scale reproductions of famous artworks, they are listening to music that is largely the real thing. "Approximately 80% of the Pageant score is original," says composer Richard Henn. "The rest is in the public domain, but even that has to be adapted for the orchestra." Henn, 39, who also conducts the 27-member pageant orchestra, has worked with the show for the last eight seasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Once Upon a Millennium Celebration, a benefit for the Laguna Art Museum. The New Year's Eve bash took place at the Wells Fargo Bank in Laguna Beach. Run on the bank: Party planners staged their gala at the bank because of its elegant antebellum-style architecture and because they wanted to send a message they didn't give a hoot about Y2K fears.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
A work commissioned for the Orange County Centennial and three young competition winners will be featured in the South Coast Symphony's 1988-89 season. Richard Henn's "Overture for the Orange County Centennial" will receive its first performance on Jan. 21, 1989, at Santa Ana High School. Henn is known locally for his scores for the Laguna Beach Pageant of the Masters for the past nine years. Competition winners will include: on Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1990 | TED SPERLING
If I were to tell a friend back home in New York that I had just spent a wonderful night in the theater where none of the actors on stage moved an inch or spoke a single word, they would probably be puzzled. That's because an evening of tableaux vivants such as Laguna Beach's "Pageant of the Masters" is a rarity everywhere except in Southern California, where it has been a yearly tradition since 1933.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
Orchestrally at least, the 1988-89 season promises to be interesting. Through a coincidence of anniversaries and leadership changes, there will be more new music and new faces in our concert halls than last year. The Long Beach Symphony, searching for a new music director following the dismissal of Murry Sidlin, brings five young American conductors to its podium: Paul Polivnick, David Alan Miller, Kenneth Kiesler, Jon Robertson and Jo Ann Falletta.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | CLAUDINE KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Claudine Ko is a regular contributor to High Life. and
There are artists who can draw with such meticulous detail and heartfelt passion that their work seems to come alive. And then there are the artists involved with the Pageant of the Masters, who are able to produce works of art that are alive. Since 1932, the Festival of Arts of Laguna Beach has presented the Pageant of the Masters, complete each summer with two volunteer casts of 121 members. Along with a narrator and orchestra, they re-create some of the world's most famous works.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Ballet Pacifica will stage its first "really complete" "Giselle" Saturday night at the Irvine Bowl in Laguna Beach, according to company founder and artistic director Lila Zali. "We've done 'Giselle' at least three times before," Zali said in a phone interview, "but we always used recordings, and it's almost ridiculous how the recordings make tiny cuts--two bars here, two bars there. Conductor Richard Henn and she "went over the score and found 79 cuts in the first act alone."
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
The modern origins of the Pageant of the Masters, Laguna Beach's peculiar summer ritual, are fairly well known: Started in 1933 to complement the Festival of Arts. Became an institution and tourist must-see. So on and so forth. But what about the gestation of the idea, the tableau vivant , or "living pictures," that inspire the pageant? Let's take a look back, way back.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | Elizabeth Kaye McCall, Special to The Times
SOUTHERN California may be filled with scriptwriters -- both actual and wannabe -- but among them, Dan Duling of Echo Park has one of the longer gigs going. Twenty-six years, to be exact. You won't find his work at the multiplex, however. Instead, he's the man behind the stories at the Pageant of the Masters, the annual Laguna Beach spectacle that employs living, breathing yet motionless performers to replicate artistic masterpieces on stage.
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