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Richard Hoffer

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October 20, 2009 | David Davis
In the summer of 1968, events were roiling America and the world: the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy; the escalation of the Vietnam War; the Soviet Union's invasion of Czechoslovakia; the radicalization of the civil rights movement. The tenor of the times consumed and overshadowed the competition at the Mexico City Olympics. Indeed, the '68 Games will forever be defined not by Bob Beamon's gravity-defying long jump, but by the black-gloved demonstration of sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos and the killing of protesting students by the Mexican police and army 10 days before the opening ceremonies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2009 | David Davis
In the summer of 1968, events were roiling America and the world: the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy; the escalation of the Vietnam War; the Soviet Union's invasion of Czechoslovakia; the radicalization of the civil rights movement. The tenor of the times consumed and overshadowed the competition at the Mexico City Olympics. Indeed, the '68 Games will forever be defined not by Bob Beamon's gravity-defying long jump, but by the black-gloved demonstration of sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos and the killing of protesting students by the Mexican police and army 10 days before the opening ceremonies.
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SPORTS
April 27, 1985
What a piece by Richard Hoffer on the Hagler-Hearns fight. Beautiful! Hemingway must be thrashing about in envy. He never did it as well. " . . . and he traded until he had no more to offer, until his legs betrayed him, until Hagler bombed him on the top of the head with a lurching overhand right, sending him reeling to the floor, soon flat on his back. . . . " That's better than "50 Grand." "The night began as a cultural affair. . . . " So elegant. So stylish. I remember that story of Hemingway's about all the kids coming to Madrid and wanting to be bullfighters and they were practicing in this cafe after hours with the butcher knives bound to chair legs to act as horns, and the last line " . . . and the knife went in him, in him, Paco."
SPORTS
February 3, 1998 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
What: "A Savage Business: The Comeback and Comedown of Mike Tyson," by Richard Hoffer. Price: $23, Simon & Schuster Anyone curious to know what lurks in the hearts of men need only read this book. Hoffer, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated, creates an excellent argument that men are composed of greed, power and savagery. Not necessarily news--Thomas Hobbes described our sadly brutish state more than 300 years ago and, it should be noted, pulled fewer punches.
SPORTS
March 11, 1989
Was Richard Hoffer watching the same fight as everyone else? To call the Macho Camacho-Boom Boom Mancini fight "nearly hideous" and state that no sharp blows were thrown all evening makes me believe that Hoffer was the one with the puffiness about the eyes. Does he consider a fight dull because neither fighter bleeds? JACK DiPINTO Woodland Hills
SPORTS
October 12, 1985
I find it hard to believe that Richard Hoffer was even in attendance the night the Dodgers won the West. I was one of the 32,000 fans in attendance and those at Dodger Stadium did not take the championship for granted as Hoffer suggests. He refers to the fans as mellow. There were three standing ovations that night and, when the Reds lost, a thunderous three-minute ovation occurred that brought the team out of the dugout in appreciation. Mellow? Hoffer writes like a man with a deadline and no story.
SPORTS
February 8, 1986
Richard Hoffer's article on the black pioneers is indeed a different kind of journalism. I was moved to read about the difficulties these forgotten giants went through and how gracefully they fought to bring basketball to its exciting state today. Thank you for bringing us a very special chapter of the history of this game. Hope you could reproduce this article on the eve of the NBA championship series. L.B. TILLAKARATNE West Los Angeles
SPORTS
May 27, 1989
Richard Hoffer's absorbing article, "These Facts Are Nothing but Fiction," reminds me of an incident while I was a student at the University of Washington in Seattle. One day at a religious organization I attended on campus, a young man showed up, said he was experienced as a professional dance teacher and was willing to teach dance classes within the building in exchange for free room and board, and expenses. He was very popular with the women and an excellent dancer. About a month or so later (after having taken some things from some of the students)
SPORTS
January 10, 1987
In Richard Hoffer's article about Penn State's 14-10 win over Miami in the Fiesta Bowl, Hoffer waited 144 words before he would tell us who won the game. I suppose most sportswriters today prefer to indulge in what they consider priceless prose, rather than telling us who won or lost. But yours is a morning paper, not everybody could watch the game on TV, and the writer doesn't know that the headline writer will include the score in his headline. You have a need for both writers and editors to get to back to some basics of journalism.
SPORTS
February 3, 1998 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
What: "A Savage Business: The Comeback and Comedown of Mike Tyson," by Richard Hoffer. Price: $23, Simon & Schuster Anyone curious to know what lurks in the hearts of men need only read this book. Hoffer, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated, creates an excellent argument that men are composed of greed, power and savagery. Not necessarily news--Thomas Hobbes described our sadly brutish state more than 300 years ago and, it should be noted, pulled fewer punches.
SPORTS
May 27, 1989
Richard Hoffer's absorbing article, "These Facts Are Nothing but Fiction," reminds me of an incident while I was a student at the University of Washington in Seattle. One day at a religious organization I attended on campus, a young man showed up, said he was experienced as a professional dance teacher and was willing to teach dance classes within the building in exchange for free room and board, and expenses. He was very popular with the women and an excellent dancer. About a month or so later (after having taken some things from some of the students)
SPORTS
March 11, 1989
Was Richard Hoffer watching the same fight as everyone else? To call the Macho Camacho-Boom Boom Mancini fight "nearly hideous" and state that no sharp blows were thrown all evening makes me believe that Hoffer was the one with the puffiness about the eyes. Does he consider a fight dull because neither fighter bleeds? JACK DiPINTO Woodland Hills
SPORTS
December 2, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
After this weekend, college football will go on a short hiatus until the bowl season brings it back. The respite gives us time to reconsider the most remarkable prediction of the year. That is, Beano Cook's call that West Virginia would win the national championship. Of course, West Virginia hasn't won it yet, but who besides Beano, ESPN's everyman analyst/sportswriter's best friend, thought the Mountaineers would even contend for it?
SPORTS
November 25, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
The Heisman Trophy is one of our quirkier awards (Doug Flutie? Tim Brown?) but even so, it would be hard to imagine it going to anybody more deserving than Oklahoma State's Barry Sanders. It's possible it won't, of course. Sanders is just a junior and he didn't play in any network television games. But who deserves it more? You could, many will, argue for USC's Rodney Peete or UCLA's Troy Aikman. They play on better teams than Sanders does and enjoy higher profiles.
SPORTS
November 18, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
This is big-game week, that time of year when rivals, cross-bay and cross-state, play for buckets, bronzed pigs and beehive boots. Important stuff. You'd be a fool to get excited about a Michigan-Ohio State game, which produces nothing , when, across the land Saturday, there will be a bell at stake. Up at California, there is more than the matter of the Ax, which Stanford holds fairly and squarely. Stanford, of course, has not always been fair or square as regards this sacred implement.
SPORTS
November 11, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
The major bowls have struck an informal agreement among themselves that is only slightly less complicated than the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act. But for now, all you need to know is that USC plays the Southeastern Conference champion in the Sugar Bowl, if not Michigan in the Rose Bowl, and UCLA plays Arkansas in the Cotton, if not the Big Ten champion at home. And whatever bowl fails to land the Pac-10 runner-up gets Florida State, or possibly West Virginia, as a consolation prize.
SPORTS
December 6, 1986 | Richard Hoffer
Mike Tyson knocked more than just Trevor Berbick for a loop when he tapped him on the left temple a couple of weeks ago. The 20-year-old Kid Kong appears to have scattered the entire division with the blow. Consider: --Tyson had barely hitched up his new World Boxing Council championship belt when Butch Lewis, co-promoter, was starting to negotiate a way out of the heavyweight tournament for his bread and butter, Michael Spinks, International Boxing Federation champion.
SPORTS
November 4, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
One of the country's five undefeated teams operates in a virtual vacuum. It's not that there's nobody in Laramie, home of the University of Wyoming. It's that there's nobody in Wyoming . The ninth-largest state in geographical size is No. 49 in population. On game days, when a good crowd might be 25,000, War Memorial Stadium becomes the third-largest "city" in the state. The rest of Laramie drops to No. 4.
SPORTS
October 28, 1988 | Richard Hoffer
It's never too early to get confused about the bowl matchups, is our premise, and what better time than right now, when we have six undefeated teams, only two of which play one another in the regular season and none of which must play each other in a bowl.
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