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Richard Holbrooke

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999
Jim Mann (International Outlook, Jan. 27) was right to draw attention to the pending confirmation of Richard Holbrooke to become U.S. envoy to the United Nations. Where Mann and I might disagree is over the rationale for the heightened scrutiny. Holbrooke came to prominence as the Balkans peace negotiator for the Clinton administration. He was widely praised for orchestrating the Dayton accords that formally ended the ghastly conflict in the former Yugoslavia. Subsequently, Holbrooke left government to join Credit Suisse First Boston, a global investment bank.
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NATIONAL
January 16, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
As President Obama and his aides prepared to memorialize the dead in Tucson, they were dealing with death close to home. Two days after the Tucson mass shooting, Ashley Turton, the wife of Dan Turton, Obama's liaison to the House of Representatives, died when her car struck a wall in their garage, igniting a flash fire. A pall fell over the White House, already dark from the news in Arizona. Several members of Obama's staff sought to help their colleague and the couple's twin toddlers and year-old baby.
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NATIONAL
December 11, 2010 | Reuters
Veteran U.S. diplomat Richard Holbrooke was in critical condition after doctors completed surgery to repair a tear in his aorta Saturday, the U.S. State Department said in a statement. Holbrooke, 69, named special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan when President Barack Obama took office in 2009, earned a reputation as a "bulldozer" in helping negotiate the 1995 accord that ended the Balkans war. The diplomat, who also served as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and to Germany and twice was assistant secretary of state, fell ill at the State Department on Friday and was taken to the hospital.
OPINION
December 16, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Richard C. Holbrooke, who died Monday at 69, was most often described in terms of his larger-than-life style. He had protean energy, bulldozer tenacity and an always visible ego, all of which he used in relentless pursuit of what he felt was America's duty: to try to fix the world's problems. But the last time I had a conversation with Holbrooke, he sounded frustrated. "How does this thing end? I don't know," he said last summer, talking about the overwhelming obstacles the U.S. faces in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | NOEL MALCOLM, Noel Malcolm is the author of "Kosovo: A Short History," published by New York University Press earlier this year
Lunching with a senior American diplomat just after the end of the Bosnian war, I found myself trying to describe the character of the one-time European negotiator on the Balkans, Lord [David] Owen. "You have to picture someone completely eaten up with egomania," I said, "a bully who imagines--mistakenly--that he's a charmer, a man whose only overriding interest in any political event is to work out how it will enhance his own status and reputation." The diplomat gave me a wan smile.
NEWS
June 18, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton has named Bill Richardson, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, to be Energy secretary and will name veteran diplomat Richard C. Holbrooke to the U.N. post, administration officials said Wednesday. Both appointments have been rumored for weeks. The officials said Clinton will make the formal announcement today.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate confirmed veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke as America's chief representative at the United Nations on Thursday after a 14-month delay that had come to symbolize the sulfurous animosity between the White House and Capitol Hill.
BOOKS
June 30, 1991 | Peggy Noonan, Noonan was a speechwriter for Presidents Reagan and Bush. Her most recent book is "What I Saw at the Revolution" (Random House).
This fine and valuable Washington memoir is not history according to a gifted and impartial historian, but history according to a great liberal who saw men and events through a certain prism. It has its biases, of which more later, but they are redeemed by the fact that this is first-person testimony from a man of enormous and focused energy who was there in the room when many of the political decisions that shaped the modern postwar world were being made.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Carrying the threat of imminent NATO airstrikes, U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke pressed Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic on Monday to accept a Kosovo peace deal, but there was no indication of a breakthrough, and the strife-torn province remained aflame. After completing about four hours of talks with Milosevic, Holbrooke spent another four hours at the U.S. Embassy here in the Yugoslav and Serbian capital, much of that time in consultation with top officials in Washington.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As point man for the Clinton Administration's newly emboldened policy on Bosnia, Richard Holbrooke has reasserted U.S. leadership in the Balkans and, to his undisguised satisfaction, thrust himself onto the center of the international stage. Starting as a junior foreign service officer in Vietnam more than 30 years ago, Holbrooke, now 54, has spent much of his adult life in diplomacy. It is a field that traditionally requires a certain measure of genteel anonymity.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
U.S. diplomat Richard C. Holbrooke died Monday of an aortic tear, which can be a quick killer that’s hard to detect. This disease also has taken the lives of actors John Ritter and Lucille Ball, and volleyball player Flo Hyman. An aortic tear, or dissection, occurs after the artery rips and blood seeps through and weakens the artery. This Los Angeles Times story explains: "A sudden spike in blood pressure or a blow to the chest, such as in a car accident, can cause the weakened artery to rupture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Richard C. Holbrooke, the Obama administration's emissary to Afghanistan and Pakistan and one of the most celebrated American diplomats of the last half-century, died Monday, the State Department said. He was 69. Holbrooke, who in 1995 brokered the deal that ended the Bosnian war, died at George Washington University Hospital after having surgery to repair a tear in his aorta. A 6-foot-2, barrel-chested man, he was renowned for his ruthless negotiating style, which came in handy when he stood up to Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic and brokered the Dayton accords that ended the Bosnian conflict.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2010 | Reuters
Veteran U.S. diplomat Richard Holbrooke was in critical condition after doctors completed surgery to repair a tear in his aorta Saturday, the U.S. State Department said in a statement. Holbrooke, 69, named special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan when President Barack Obama took office in 2009, earned a reputation as a "bulldozer" in helping negotiate the 1995 accord that ended the Balkans war. The diplomat, who also served as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and to Germany and twice was assistant secretary of state, fell ill at the State Department on Friday and was taken to the hospital.
WORLD
June 25, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
By ousting his top general in Afghanistan, President Obama may have solved the biggest personnel problem in conducting the war. But he made it clear that there are others, and hinted that more heads could roll. So when the president said he would tolerate debate but not division, some saw it as a message aimed straight at his special envoy for the region, Richard C. Holbrooke. Eighteen months ago, expectations were that the fabled diplomat who began his career in Vietnam and helped end the Balkan wars would become the dominant civilian official in an expanding U.S. effort in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
WORLD
October 8, 2009 | Paul Richter
The American envoy's armed convoy rumbled through the dusty streets of Kabul, stopping at one polling place, then another, as Afghans voted in their first contested presidential election. In the August heat, Richard C. Holbrooke watched the balloting, his satisfaction tinged with concern. Widespread violence had been averted. But the integrity of the election, so vital to American plans, had yet to be proved. Mingling with people and sampling pastry sold by some children on a corner, Holbrooke said the process appeared "peaceful and orderly," but warned as he squinted at one of the complicated punch cards that "the test comes when people count the ballots."
WORLD
August 21, 2009 | Paul Richter
Poll workers at a Kabul school didn't seem too alarmed Thursday to see voters struggling to mark their ballots by punching out the tiny paper circle called a chad. For a group of U.S. officials, however, the snag summoned disconcerting memories of ballot failures in Florida in 2000 that threw the American presidential election into turmoil. "From Dade County to Kabul, man," said a bemused Richard C. Holbrooke, U.S. envoy for the region, as he examined a ballot. His comment was one of the lighter signs of the anxiety U.S. officials felt as they watched an election that could be a turning point in massive effort to stabilize the country.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | Associated Press
President Clinton plans to nominate Richard Holbrooke to be assistant secretary of state for European and Canadian affairs. Holbrooke has been U.S. ambassador to Germany for less than a year. The White House announced the nomination Friday as Clinton traveled in Missouri.
WORLD
June 28, 2009 | Associated Press
The United States is shifting its strategy against Afghanistan's drug trade, phasing out funding for opium eradication while boosting efforts to fight trafficking and promote alternate crops, the U.S. envoy for the region said Saturday. The aim of the new policy: to deprive the Taliban of the tens of millions of dollars in drug revenue that is fueling its insurgency. Richard C. Holbrooke, the U.S.
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