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Richard Hongisto

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NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Times staff and wire reports
Former San Francisco Police Chief Richard Hongisto has been named president and chief executive officer of Phoenix Operations, a private security and investigative firm. Hongisto, 55, joined the San Francisco-based firm as vice president for planning and development in June, a month after his dismissal as police chief. He was fired over the removal of gay newspapers from their news racks. The papers had lampooned his actions to combat riots sparked by the verdicts in the Rodney G.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2004 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Richard Hongisto, whose two decades in San Francisco public office as sheriff, supervisor and -- briefly -- police chief were packed with controversy and pioneering efforts on behalf of minorities and women, has died. He was 67. Hongisto died early Thursday at the Bayview district apartment he shared with his girlfriend. The cause of death was under investigation, but appeared to be a heart attack. Hongisto straddled many worlds in his turbulent career.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd game of musical chairs, Mayor Frank Jordan on Monday picked one of his political rivals, county Assessor Richard Hongisto, to become the city's new police chief. Even in San Francisco, where off-beat politics are the norm, the mayor's selection of Hongisto came as a shock. Jordan, a former police chief, and Hongisto, a liberal and the city's former sheriff, differ greatly in style and political point of view.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Times staff and wire reports
Former San Francisco Police Chief Richard Hongisto has been named president and chief executive officer of Phoenix Operations, a private security and investigative firm. Hongisto, 55, joined the San Francisco-based firm as vice president for planning and development in June, a month after his dismissal as police chief. He was fired over the removal of gay newspapers from their news racks. The papers had lampooned his actions to combat riots sparked by the verdicts in the Rodney G.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After just 44 days on the job, Police Chief Richard Hongisto was fired Friday for allegedly ordering three police officers to confiscate copies of a gay newspaper that mocked his handling of protests over the verdicts in the Rodney G. King beating case. The San Francisco Police Commission, at an extraordinary emergency meeting, voted unanimously to dismiss the chief after concluding that he had abused his authority by trying to suppress the small biweekly tabloid.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Richard Hongisto, already accused of violating the civil rights of protesters, faced three investigations Wednesday for allegedly ordering police officers to seize thousands of copies of a newspaper that criticized him. In a city that has long prided itself on its tolerance, the charge against Hongisto caused an immediate uproar and presented Mayor Frank Jordan with the most serious crisis of his 4-month-old Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2004 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Richard Hongisto, whose two decades in San Francisco public office as sheriff, supervisor and -- briefly -- police chief were packed with controversy and pioneering efforts on behalf of minorities and women, has died. He was 67. Hongisto died early Thursday at the Bayview district apartment he shared with his girlfriend. The cause of death was under investigation, but appeared to be a heart attack. Hongisto straddled many worlds in his turbulent career.
NEWS
December 22, 1987
The San Francisco city Public Utilities Commission approved a new 27 1/2-year contract with Pacific Gas & Electric Co. for distribution of hydroelectric power generated at the city-owned Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
NEWS
May 11, 1986
San Francisco Supervisor Richard Hongisto, a former sheriff and potential mayoral candidate, has been sentenced to 80 hours of community service, a $784 fine and three years' probation after being convicted of drunk driving in Marin County. Municipal Judge Lynn Taylor imposed the unusually severe sentence, while at the same time restricting Hongisto's driving privileges for 90 days, during which he may only drive to and from work.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Acting Police Chief Tom Murphy announced his retirement from the force a day after he was passed over for the top job. Capt. Anthony Ribera, 47, was confirmed as police chief by the city Police Commission several hours after his nomination by Mayor Frank Jordan. Ribera is a 24-year veteran of the San Francisco Police Department. Murphy, with the department nearly 20 years, had filled in as interim chief since May when Richard Hongisto was fired.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After just 44 days on the job, Police Chief Richard Hongisto was fired Friday for allegedly ordering three police officers to confiscate copies of a gay newspaper that mocked his handling of protests over the verdicts in the Rodney G. King beating case. The San Francisco Police Commission, at an extraordinary emergency meeting, voted unanimously to dismiss the chief after concluding that he had abused his authority by trying to suppress the small biweekly tabloid.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Richard Hongisto, already accused of violating the civil rights of protesters, faced three investigations Wednesday for allegedly ordering police officers to seize thousands of copies of a newspaper that criticized him. In a city that has long prided itself on its tolerance, the charge against Hongisto caused an immediate uproar and presented Mayor Frank Jordan with the most serious crisis of his 4-month-old Administration.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd game of musical chairs, Mayor Frank Jordan on Monday picked one of his political rivals, county Assessor Richard Hongisto, to become the city's new police chief. Even in San Francisco, where off-beat politics are the norm, the mayor's selection of Hongisto came as a shock. Jordan, a former police chief, and Hongisto, a liberal and the city's former sheriff, differ greatly in style and political point of view.
NEWS
September 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Former Police Chief Richard Hongisto committed civil rights violations in the removal of a newspaper from its racks, a jury found Friday. The panel decided Hongisto and two officers committed the violations by removing from news racks 2,000 copies of a free newspaper that lampooned the chief for ordering mass arrests of demonstrators after the verdict in the first Rodney G. King trial. A cartoon showed the chief in a lewd pose. The U.S.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith said his office will not prosecute most of the approximately 575 people arrested May 8 during a demonstration against the Rodney G. King beating case verdict. Smith said the misdemeanor charges would be dropped because prosecutors could not prove the identities of demonstration participants.
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