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Richard Hoover

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Richard Hoover was in New York, designing a $32-million movie ("Rucker") and the set of an off-Broadway musical revue ("The Thing About Men"). But at the moment, his thoughts were on his most recent project in Hollywood: a $40,000 Actors' Gang production, "The Mysteries," which opened Saturday. Told that his listener would soon visit the set of "The Mysteries," which was still being built as he spoke, Hoover had one simple request: "If you've got any lumber, bring it over."
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NEWS
October 9, 2003
The Mysteries: Director-adapter Brian Kulick's exploration of medieval mystery plays (and their antecedents) is wildly inventive, and Richard Hoover creates a striking setting. Act 1 presents Old Testament sagas drawn from the British York, Wakefield and Chester cycles, closing on the Nativity. Act 2 brings New Testament accounts reenvisioned by 20th century authors Borislav Pekic, Dario Fo and Mikhail Bulgakov, ending with a York Cycle summation.
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NEWS
October 9, 2003
The Mysteries: Director-adapter Brian Kulick's exploration of medieval mystery plays (and their antecedents) is wildly inventive, and Richard Hoover creates a striking setting. Act 1 presents Old Testament sagas drawn from the British York, Wakefield and Chester cycles, closing on the Nativity. Act 2 brings New Testament accounts reenvisioned by 20th century authors Borislav Pekic, Dario Fo and Mikhail Bulgakov, ending with a York Cycle summation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Richard Hoover was in New York, designing a $32-million movie ("Rucker") and the set of an off-Broadway musical revue ("The Thing About Men"). But at the moment, his thoughts were on his most recent project in Hollywood: a $40,000 Actors' Gang production, "The Mysteries," which opened Saturday. Told that his listener would soon visit the set of "The Mysteries," which was still being built as he spoke, Hoover had one simple request: "If you've got any lumber, bring it over."
SCIENCE
February 26, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A newly discovered life form that froze on Earth about 30,000 years ago has apparently been alive since then and started swimming as soon as it thawed, according to a NASA scientist. The microscopic organism -- a bacterium called Carnobacterium pleistocenium -- probably flourished in the Pleistocene Age, Richard Hoover of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama reported Wednesday. That would make it a contemporary of woolly mammoths and saber-tooth tigers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995
"Schools Hurt by Shortage of Counselors" (Aug. 7) highlights a problem in California schools that is only getting worse. While other states such as Arkansas and Florida mandate counselors in the schools, California does not. School counselors are expendable in this state and exist at the whim of local school boards, superintendents and principals. Unfortunately, this state of affairs exists at time when students face more crises and impediments to learning than ever before. Child abuse, broken homes, alcohol/drug abuse, teen pregnancy, gang violence and suicide, the second leading cause of death for youth ages 10-19, to name a few. Further, college-bound young people are finding less help available when they really need it. RICHARD HOOVER Executive Vice President California Assn.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
We doubt that either Dr. Oz or Andrew Wakefield will be proudly displaying these honors on their mantelpieces: Both received "Pigasus Awards" this April 1 from the  James  Randi  Educational  Foundation for the dubious honor of being among the "5 worst promoters of nonsense. " Dr. Mehmet Oz got the "Media" Pigasus. The foundation explains why he won the prize: "Dr. Oz is a Harvard-educated cardiac physician who, through his syndicated TV show, has promoted faith healing, 'energy medicine,' and other quack theories that have no scientific basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2002 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Unbridled flimflam energizes "Alagazam," freaking out in the late-night slot at the Actors' Gang. Director Brent Hinkley and a demented cast devour Adam Simon and Tim Robbins' tent-show vaudeville with fearless perversity. Reworking the authors' 1985 "Slick Slack Griff Graff," "Alagazam" wraps carnival circuitry around a symbolist post-World War II America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two men are adrift on a rooftop in the ocean. They are strangers to each other who speak different languages--hostile and wary men in military fatigues, from different countries. Survival depends on their ability to communicate, to work together. Will they? With slapstick humor and poignancy, "Robinson and Crusoe," a timely absurdist fable for children at Barnsdall Art Park's Gallery Theatre, reveals the superficiality of sociological barriers to human connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2011
Did you enjoy "Sheen's Korner" on UStream on Saturday? There may be a lot more coming on HDNet very soon. ( Hollywood Reporter ) And maybe AMC? The creator of "The Walking Dead" really wants Sheen on his series. ( Hollywood Reporter ) "Rango" lassos the highest weekend gross so far this year. ( Los Angeles Times ) At age 76, most people are slowing down, but Japanese porn star Shigeo Tokuda is getting busy. ( Los Angeles Times ) Phil Collins has decided to quit the music scene altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Texas is the only state that allows its residents to vote from space - a practical matter, since most NASA astronauts live in Houston. A quest for the stars is a common pursuit in “Foote Notes,” a luminous and deeply moving staging of two rarely seen Horton Foote one-acts, now at Open Fist Theatre. Under Scott Paulin's fine direction, the residents of Harrison, Texas, chase big dreams just out of reach. In “A Young Lady of Property,” set in 1925, sassy teenage Wilma (the excellent Juliette Goglia)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
When first published in 1939, James Hadley Chase's gangster classic, "No Orchids for Miss Blandish," pushed the envelope of propriety to a shocking degree and wound up a perennial bestseller. The 1978 stage adaptation by Scottish producer and playwright Robert David MacDonald, presented at the Ivy Substation by the Evidence Room, is more camp than cutting edge, a no-holds-barred melodrama that goes as far over the top as a vintage Cagney movie.
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