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Richard Hudson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995
Richard Hudson, a pioneer in theories used to trace human evolution, has been elected to the 215-year-old American Academy of Arts and Sciences for his work in theories used to trace human evolution. Hudson, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at UC Irvine, was also recognized for the creation of mathematical models in connection with his theories.
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NATIONAL
December 12, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly approved a budget deal Thursday designed to avert another government shutdown, a rare bipartisan accord that breaks with the tea-party-driven cycle of brinkmanship and could signal a new era of political pragmatism in Congress. The agreement represents a victory for House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio), who appears to have regained at least momentary control of his rebellious majority and turned back the super-sized influence of outside conservative groups.
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NATIONAL
December 12, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly approved a budget deal Thursday designed to avert another government shutdown, a rare bipartisan accord that breaks with the tea-party-driven cycle of brinkmanship and could signal a new era of political pragmatism in Congress. The agreement represents a victory for House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio), who appears to have regained at least momentary control of his rebellious majority and turned back the super-sized influence of outside conservative groups.
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Nicholas Thompson, Nicholas Thompson is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
Bell curves describe much of the world. The average major league baseball player hits about .265 over a season, and most players cluster around that number. More people hit .275 than .305; no one hits .650. Similar limits apply to outdoor temperature, freeway speeds, human height and much more. It'll be a strange day when you see a 40-foot man driving a car 400 mph in the 400-degree heat. In statistics, bell curves tellingly fit "normal distributions."
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Nicholas Thompson, Nicholas Thompson is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
Bell curves describe much of the world. The average major league baseball player hits about .265 over a season, and most players cluster around that number. More people hit .275 than .305; no one hits .650. Similar limits apply to outdoor temperature, freeway speeds, human height and much more. It'll be a strange day when you see a 40-foot man driving a car 400 mph in the 400-degree heat. In statistics, bell curves tellingly fit "normal distributions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991
A North Hollywood gang member was ordered Thursday to stand trial on charges that he was part of a group that fatally beat a man who crashed his car into other cars while drunkenly leaving a Canoga Park party. Van Nuys Municipal Judge Leslie A. Dunn ordered the trial for Richard Hudson, 24, who is charged with murder in the Jan. 12 slaying of William Younger, 37, of North Hollywood.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Republican candidate for Congress is offering campaign volunteers extra protection for their visits to immigrant neighborhoods: escorts from the National Rifle Assn. Democrats said the offer by the campaign of incumbent Rep. Robert "Robin" Hayes is an insult to residents, and they held a rally Saturday.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Atty. Gen. Robert Spire said today that a seven-month investigation into Nebraska horse racing "does not disclose any criminal violations by state Racing Commission officials or employees." He said his office considers the case closed. Spire specifically said the investigation had uncovered no improper conduct by Harry F. Farnham, former commission chairman. He said the investigation by the Nebraska State Patrol "was careful, thorough and professional."
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
TAMPA, Fla. -- Top GOP congressional candidates -- "our lead salesmen," as one campaign chief put it -- took to the stage at the Republican National Convention, delivering speeches, cheers and, in one case, a song. Republicans are seeking to retain their majority in the House and wrest away control of the Senate this November, and their showcase candidates helped launch the convention Tuesday. "We need a president who believes in America," said Mark Meadows, a businessman running for an open House seat in North Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2002 | TERRY KINNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Dragonfly TV," the new PBS science series for children, looks a lot like an MTV video to some adults. "This stuff moves fast, and it has incessant music," said executive producer Richard Hudson. "Dragonfly TV" comes from Twin Cities Public Television, producer of the long-running "Newton's Apple," and is based on a children's magazine developed at Miami (Ohio) University. The show is aimed at 9- to 12-year olds and has youngsters as hosts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995
Richard Hudson, a pioneer in theories used to trace human evolution, has been elected to the 215-year-old American Academy of Arts and Sciences for his work in theories used to trace human evolution. Hudson, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at UC Irvine, was also recognized for the creation of mathematical models in connection with his theories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Woman Chaser" is a minor diversion enlivened by some hilarious moments that above all serves as a potent big-screen calling card for Patrick Warburton, best known as Puddy from TV's "Seinfeld." In "The Woman Chaser," which director Robinson Devor adapted from a 1960 pulp novel written by "Miami Blue's" Charles Willeford, Warburton is a burly, hairy-chested guy who looks like an ex-football player and sounds like a Phi Beta Kappa. When we first see him, seated in a dark L.A.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - More than a decade after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the Transportation Security Administration is reassessing airline safety with an eye toward identifying the most likely threats. On Thursday, TSA Administrator John Pistole made his first appearance before Congress since last week's announcement that small knives, golf clubs, hockey sticks and assorted other items were no longer prohibited. "These are not things that terrorists are intending to use," Pistole told a House Homeland Security subcommittee.
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