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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
"I hate using the word 'God.' It's a word I find very troubling." Musing on his interpretation of the title role in "Richard II" for the Old Globe Theatre's Festival '86, actor Brian Bedford was deep into the more profound layers of Shakespeare's tragedy. "You could just say 'Self,' but then some people wouldn't understand that," he ventured.
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OPINION
January 13, 2014 | By Barbara Garson
If Chris Christie's insistence that he didn't order his aides to snarl traffic on the George Washington Bridge sounds familiar, it should. Think Shakespeare. More specifically, think "Richard II. " Reading the emails sent by Christie's aides and appointees, I couldn't help but think about the scene in which Sir Pierce of Exton has a conversation with an unnamed servant. They've both heard King Henry IV express what sounds like a wish to have the imprisoned former king, Richard, executed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY
Kelsey Grammer, best known as Dr. Frasier Crane on "Cheers," has replaced John Glover in the title role of "Richard II," opening April 23 at the Mark Taper Forum. Glover left, before rehearsals began, in order to shoot a yet-to-be-announced TV-movie, said a spokeswoman for the actor, who recently starred in "Henceforward . . . " at the Taper. Robert Egan, who's directing "Richard II," also used Grammer in his staging of "Measure for Measure" at the Taper in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Much that was old was new again in 2013, which turned out to be a very good year for the classics. It wasn't a bad year for new work either, even if too many of today's most provocative playwrights are getting short shrift from this town's nonprofit heavyweights. I was especially glad to see Samuel D. Hunter's "The Whale" at South Coast Repertory, but to catch "The Flick," the latest from Annie Baker (for my money, the most exciting American dramatist working today), I had to hop a flight to New York, where Playwrights Horizons was presenting the world premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | L. KENNETH RICHARDSON, Richardson directed "The Colored Museum" at the Mark Taper Forum and "The Task" at Taper, Too. and
I was planning to respond to Sylvie Drake's review of "Richard II" (" 'Richard II': No Great Shakes" at the Mark Taper Forum, Calendar, April 24) before the fires of revolution burned the streets of Los Angeles. Now in the aftermath of what is being considered one of the most significant examples of civil unrest in America since the Civil War, I am concerned more than ever about what is happening in today's theater. I feel I must respond to Drake.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER and At 3116 2nd St., Santa Monica, Tuesdays, 8 p.m., through May 15. $9; (213) 660-7237. and
"Richard II" is infrequently staged. The Angel City Repertory production, directed by Randall Sommer at the Powerhouse, makes one wonder why. Shakespeare's tragic history of incompetence and ambition did not amuse his regal patrons. His Richard is utterly over his head, unable to squelch his court's internal quarreling, which breaks out into an open rebellion led by Henry Bolingbroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
As usual, Jules Aaron is a very busy boy. On Friday, his staging of "Richard II" opens, inaugurating the 10th annual Grove Shakespeare Festival. Then it's off to Long Beach's International City Theatre, where he will do Judie Fein's "Channels," opening Aug. 4. Then it's off to Costa Mesa to direct an Aug. 13 reading of Charles Gomez's "Bang Bang Blues" for South Coast Repertory's annual Hispanic Playwrights Project. Then it's off to Capital Repertory to stage Elizabeth Diggs' "Saint Florence."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
During the Watergate era, Brian Bedford played Shakespeare's Richard III as a somber Nixon-style politician, all business. In contrast, Bedford plays Richard III's predecessor, Richard II, as a king who has a hard time taking his job seriously. Such a bore, having to listen patiently as two windy nobles go on and on about what a miscreant the other is. In the Old Globe Theatre's production here, Richard rolls his eyes at the court to get a laugh, and gets it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Shakespeare's primer on political power, "Richard II," opened the 10th Grove Shakespeare Festival on Saturday amid a demonstration of the importance of political power. In the wake of decisions by the Garden Grove City Council last week to grant only $20,000 of the Grove Theatre Company's request for a $53,000 advance on its 1988-89 city appropriation, artistic director Thomas F. Bradac and board member Robert Dunek appealed to the audience for contributions before the play began.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Director Robert Egan's staging of "Richard II" at the Mark Taper Forum has so many ideas and effects competing for attention with Shakespeare's text that Wednesday's magnitude 6.1 earthquake could almost have passed for one more attention-getter. The ground rolled, the lights swayed, the actors froze in midsentence and a few audience members started for the doors. But, in general, everyone at Wednesday's press preview remained uncommonly calm.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: Southern California: David Mamet's "American Buffalo" was revived at the Geffen with its concussive verbal force and fierce con games intact. Christopher Shinn's "Dying City" delicately explored the slipperiness of traumatic memory in a multilayered production at Rogue Machine. John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman brought anguish and ecstasy to the searing Mark Taper Forum revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Hollow Crown," which begins Friday on PBS under the venerable standard of its "Great Performances," comprises four Shakespeare plays, often called the Henriad as there is a King Henry (Henry IV, then Henry V) in each of them. It's too much to say that this is what television was made for - since it was also made for professional wrestling and situation comedies - but it is part of its original promise and compact, that ennobling great works of art (ennobling in their greatness, that is, not in any didactic way)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Times Television Critic
"The Hollow Crown" (PBS, Fridays) . Here is my man Shakespeare back again, and not a moment too soon -- the best man, to steal a line from the writer himself, "either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral, scene individable, or poem unlimited. " This BBC import, arriving on our shore under the banner of PBS' "Great Performances," brings together four linked history plays: "Richard II," "Henry IV, Parts One and Two" and "Henry V," sometimes called "The Henriad.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Richard II," Shakespeare's history play about the fate of a king who talks a better game than he delivers, is given an entrancing stripped-down production at the Theatre @ Boston Court. Jessica Kubzansky, the theater's co-artistic director, has adapted and directed what she's calling "R II," a deft distillation of the drama that begins after Richard has been taken prisoner. Performed by an adroit cast of three, Kubzansky's version proceeds in flashbacks that are staged with laser-like precision, each scene offering another angle on this political object lesson.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2008 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The second offering in Shakespeare's historical tetralogy, "Henry IV, Part I" mingles copious comedy with scads of swash and buckle. It's easy to see why the play -- the Elizabethan equivalent of an action film -- has been so enduringly popular. In their current staging at A Noise Within, co-directors Geoff Elliott and Julia Rodriguez-Elliott tackle Shakespeare's history with brisk forthrightness. The flatly painted backdrop in Michael C. Smith's uncomplicated set looks like it was salvaged from a traveling troupe, while Soojin Lee's sumptuous period costumes could have been gleaned from storage at the Old Vic. Take that as a statement of intent for this production, which is, quite simply, old school Shakespeare, smartly done, from its lively tavern scenes to the epic Battle of Shrewsbury.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The Independent Shakespeare Company continues its summer of free Shakespeare in Barnsdall Art Park with "Macbeth," which plays in rotating repertory with "Richard II" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Now in its fourth season, this crisply professional company offers solid renderings of the Bard atop the balmy promontory of Barnsdall, where playgoers picnic and lounge under the stars while watching the evening's entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A film version of Shakespeare's popular "Richard III," starring Ian McKellan, is playing at movie theaters across the country, but it's considerably more difficult to find a version of the less frequently performed "Richard II." Until now, that is--though a trip to the outskirts of Moorpark is necessary. The California Shakespeare Company, the only group in Ventura County to regularly plumb the Bard's lesser-known works, is producing the play, under the direction of William Fisher.
OPINION
January 13, 2014 | By Barbara Garson
If Chris Christie's insistence that he didn't order his aides to snarl traffic on the George Washington Bridge sounds familiar, it should. Think Shakespeare. More specifically, think "Richard II. " Reading the emails sent by Christie's aides and appointees, I couldn't help but think about the scene in which Sir Pierce of Exton has a conversation with an unnamed servant. They've both heard King Henry IV express what sounds like a wish to have the imprisoned former king, Richard, executed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2007 | Philip Brandes, F. Kathleen Foley, Daryl H. Miller
A suitably frothy, tuneful staging by West Coast Ensemble makes it easy to understand the off-Broadway success of the whimsical musical fairy tale, "Zanna, Don't!" Creator Tim Acito (with Alexander Dinelaris) borrowed the title pun and dimension-hopping antics from "Xanadu" to launch us into an alternate reality that mirrors present-day Americana -- except everyone in it is gay. Without taking itself seriously, the show wittily tweaks homophobia with a parade of inverted stereotypes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2006 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
Former Lynwood Mayor Paul H. Richards II was ordered Monday to serve nearly 16 years behind bars, a sentence that federal prosecutors described as one of the longest in any U.S. public corruption case. Richards, a 50-year-old former attorney, was convicted in November of steering city contracts to a front corporation he secretly owned. The scheme could have netted Richards more than $6 million, although he managed to siphon off only $500,000 before authorities interrupted, they said.
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