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Richard Iii

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
There are as many ways to reanimate Shakespeare onstage as there are methods of interpreting him on the page. Adrian Noble, artistic director of the Old Globe's Shakespeare Festival and the former artistic director and chief executive of the Royal Shakespeare Company, seems to favor directorial strategies of a holistic nature. Which is to say that there are no distracting concepts imposed on his production of "As You Like It" or Lindsay Posner's staging of "Richard III," the two Shakespeare offerings in the Old Globe's annual outdoor festival.
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SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
The skeleton of the medieval monarch King Richard III will bear just one final indignity before it is laid, once again, to rest. Researchers at the University of Leicester in England plan to sequence the deceased ruler's entire genome by collecting some of his bone material, grinding it into a powder, and then extracting the DNA. But time is running out. "He will be re-interred soon, so the ability to do this just exists for a short amount...
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OPINION
September 15, 2012
Re "Bones found may be English king," Sept. 13 It seems that more than 600 years after he died defending his crown against upstart Tudors, Richard III - who for centuries was unfairly demonized by his enemies as the murderer of the "two princes" who disappeared mysteriously in the Tower of London - will have justice after all. The demonstration that truth and justice do prevail, even if it takes centuries, is a spiritual lesson about the...
SCIENCE
September 3, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
King Richard III may have suffered from a parasite as nasty as his reputation. The remains of the medieval monarch -- villainized by William Shakespeare as a tyrant who killed his nephews in order to seize the throne -- show signs of roundworm infection, scientists say. Archaeologists have undertaken careful analysis of Richard III's remains since excavating them from a parking lot in the English city of Leicester in 2012. They've discovered several roundworm eggs in the soil around his pelvis, suggesting that the parasite lived in the king's intestines.
OPINION
September 8, 2012
Re "Race to unearth a royal mystery," Column One, Sept. 5 At last, we may have some truth about Richard III, who has been maligned for centuries. Let's remember that history is written by the victors - in this case, the Tudors - after Henry VII, whose claim was very tenuous, gained the throne. No one really knows what happened to the little princes in the tower. We do know that their succession to the throne was not valid when it was discovered that Edward IV's wife, Elizabeth Woodville, had been betrothed before marrying Edward, and therefore their marriage and thus their children were not legitimate.
WORLD
February 4, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- More than 500 years after his death in battle, scientists announced Monday that they had definitively identified a skeleton unearthed in central England last summer as that of Richard III, the medieval king portrayed by William Shakespeare as a homicidal tyrant who killed his two young nephews in order to ascend the throne. DNA from the bones, found beneath the ruins of an old church, matches that of a living descendant of the monarch's sister, researchers said. "Rarely have the conclusions of academic research been so eagerly awaited," Richard Buckley, the lead archaeologist on the excavation, told a phalanx of reporters Monday morning.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | Kenneth Turan
Made with gusto, daring and visual brilliance, this stripped-down, jazzed-up "Richard" pulsates with bloody life, a triumph of both modernization and popularization. Director Richard Loncraine and star Ian McKellen (pictured), who also collaborated on the screenplay of the 1995 film, keeps the spirit of Shakespeare's words (though the play is much-abridged here) but switched the setting from the 15th century to England of the 1930s (TMC Monday at 12:05 p.m.).
OPINION
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Orent
Who was Richard III? We've got an idea of what he looked like thanks to a new 3-D reconstruction of his head, made after the discovery of his skull, along with the rest of his skeleton, under a parking lot in Leicester, England. But what kind of person he was remains in dispute. Was the king, who died at 32 in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, an emerging democrat and saintly protector? Or was he the "poisonous bunch-backed toad" of Shakespeare's "Richard III," an ogre who murdered his brother's sons and stole the crown, making him the most notorious usurper in English history?
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
In America, we paved paradise and put up a parking lot. In Britain, they put up a parking lot and paved over a king. As my colleague Henry Chu reported : More than 500 years after his death in battle, scientists announced Monday that they had definitively identified a skeleton unearthed in northern England last summer as that of Richard III, the medieval king portrayed by William Shakespeare as a homicidal tyrant who killed his two...
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
It was hard to find the physical remains of King Richard III . Imagine how hard, then, to psychoanalyze the man. That, nonetheless, is what Mark Landsdale, head of the University of Leicester School of Psychology, has attempted to do, with help from colleague Julian Boon, a forensic psychologist. They presented their findings over the weekend at the university. Last month, scientists from the same university announced they had found and identified the remains of the last of England's Plantagenet monarchs, depicted by Shakespeare as a murderous, hunchbacked psychopath who assassinated two young princes.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
It's the Leicester parking lot that just keeps giving. Last summer, archaeologists discovered the long-lost remains of King Richard III, buried beneath a nondescript parking lot in the English town of Leicester. This summer, the same team returned to the site and discovered something more puzzling: A medieval coffin of lead, buried inside a medieval coffin of stone. And inside the lead coffin they found a human skeleton - its knobbly feet jutting out out from a hole at the bottom of the coffin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Broadway will get a concentrated dose of comedy and tragedy this fall - brought on by acclaimed British actor Mark Rylance. The two-time Tony winner - formerly artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe in London - will star in Globe productions of “Twelfth Night” and “Richard III, ” which will rotate in repertory for a 16-week engagement at New York's Belasco Theatre, said producers Sonia Friedman and Scott Landis. The productions first opened at the Globe last summer and later transferred to the West End; Rylance received rave reviews for his leading roles as "Twelfth Night's" lovesick, wealthy countess Olivia and the titular, scheming Richard III. British actor-author Stephen Fry will make his Broadway acting debut opposite Rylance, playing Malvolio, in "Twelfth Night.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
It was hard to find the physical remains of King Richard III . Imagine how hard, then, to psychoanalyze the man. That, nonetheless, is what Mark Landsdale, head of the University of Leicester School of Psychology, has attempted to do, with help from colleague Julian Boon, a forensic psychologist. They presented their findings over the weekend at the university. Last month, scientists from the same university announced they had found and identified the remains of the last of England's Plantagenet monarchs, depicted by Shakespeare as a murderous, hunchbacked psychopath who assassinated two young princes.
OPINION
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Orent
Who was Richard III? We've got an idea of what he looked like thanks to a new 3-D reconstruction of his head, made after the discovery of his skull, along with the rest of his skeleton, under a parking lot in Leicester, England. But what kind of person he was remains in dispute. Was the king, who died at 32 in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, an emerging democrat and saintly protector? Or was he the "poisonous bunch-backed toad" of Shakespeare's "Richard III," an ogre who murdered his brother's sons and stole the crown, making him the most notorious usurper in English history?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
For the last few days, King Richard III - dead now for more than 500 years - has briefly managed to overtake Kate Middleton as England's most-Googled royal, but not everyone is thrilled by the incredible news. Stephen Colbert, for one, thinks we ought to leave poor ol' Dick alone.    “All of us in cable news have an obligation to bring you the latest news most relevant to your life. So let's get to the story everyone's talking about: The fall of the house of York,” he said Tuesday on “The Colbert Report.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
In America, we paved paradise and put up a parking lot. In Britain, they put up a parking lot and paved over a king. As my colleague Henry Chu reported : More than 500 years after his death in battle, scientists announced Monday that they had definitively identified a skeleton unearthed in northern England last summer as that of Richard III, the medieval king portrayed by William Shakespeare as a homicidal tyrant who killed his two...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
This is to commend you for the printing of Paul Greenberg's "Richard III, the Newest Nixon" (Editorial Page, July 2). Many plagues, reminiscent of biblical times, have visited our political landscape in recent times. How do we account for these afflictions, one after the other? Looking for answers can be complex and mind-boggling, and would go beyond any one letter. However it does strike me that a perusal of Richard M. Nixon's entire career and its influence on our lives, sheds some light on this question.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
For the last few days, King Richard III - dead now for more than 500 years - has briefly managed to overtake Kate Middleton as England's most-Googled royal, but not everyone is thrilled by the incredible news. Stephen Colbert, for one, thinks we ought to leave poor ol' Dick alone.    “All of us in cable news have an obligation to bring you the latest news most relevant to your life. So let's get to the story everyone's talking about: The fall of the house of York,” he said Tuesday on “The Colbert Report.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
After centuries, it seems, the once-lost body of King Richard III of England has been identified.  At a news conference Monday, a team from the University of Leicester reported that a skeleton unearthed last fall was "beyond reasonable doubt" that of the last Plantagenet monarch, who died in 1485 during the Battle of Bosworth Field. Citing DNA evidence collected from the remains, the team reported that some of the skeleton's genetic information matched that of two living relatives of the king.
WORLD
February 4, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- More than 500 years after his death in battle, scientists announced Monday that they had definitively identified a skeleton unearthed in central England last summer as that of Richard III, the medieval king portrayed by William Shakespeare as a homicidal tyrant who killed his two young nephews in order to ascend the throne. DNA from the bones, found beneath the ruins of an old church, matches that of a living descendant of the monarch's sister, researchers said. "Rarely have the conclusions of academic research been so eagerly awaited," Richard Buckley, the lead archaeologist on the excavation, told a phalanx of reporters Monday morning.
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