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Richard Iii Play

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December 27, 1995 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sir Ian McKellen conceived of turning his very successful stage portrayal of Shakespeare's Richard III into a movie, the reaction among studio executives was fairly underwhelming. At best, he encountered muted enthusiasm. "When I started out three years ago, people were very suspicious of it, particularly in this town," McKellen said over a breakfast of toast and coffee in his Beverly Hills-area hotel suite. "They'd say, 'Good try, show me the movie when it's made.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1995 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sir Ian McKellen conceived of turning his very successful stage portrayal of Shakespeare's Richard III into a movie, the reaction among studio executives was fairly underwhelming. At best, he encountered muted enthusiasm. "When I started out three years ago, people were very suspicious of it, particularly in this town," McKellen said over a breakfast of toast and coffee in his Beverly Hills-area hotel suite. "They'd say, 'Good try, show me the movie when it's made.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Sir Ian McKellen is Shakespeare's demonic "Richard III." In a portrayal recalling everything from Jack Nicholson's Joker to Peter O'Toole's "Lion in Winter," the actor possesses the stage at the Curran Theatre even when he's not speaking. McKellen's Richard struts, mugs, charms, repels and kills with equal passion and credibility--at one point even successfully wooing the widow of the man he just killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Sir Ian McKellen is Shakespeare's demonic "Richard III." In a portrayal recalling everything from Jack Nicholson's Joker to Peter O'Toole's "Lion in Winter," the actor possesses the stage at the Curran Theatre even when he's not speaking. McKellen's Richard struts, mugs, charms, repels and kills with equal passion and credibility--at one point even successfully wooing the widow of the man he just killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Three indelible scenes and a central performance dripping in evil rescue Shakespeare's "Richard III," final show of the season to join the Old Globe repertory, from the blandness of pageant/spectacle and bring it into the realm of theater. One is Richard's ill-begotten coronation. It is a stunning display of pomp and blind ambition as Richard ascends the throne, leaving his queen (Deborah May)--the widow of a man he murdered--to crumple to the floor before him.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2007
Lisa Wolpe, artistic director of the respected Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company, is in her 12th season of staging plays by the Bard with all-female casts. Gender-bending isn't a gimmick for the company. It has earned kudos for its gutsy, true-to-the-source productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
"My film's godfather would never double-cross anyone. The real godfathers double-crossed people over and over. But remember, 'The Godfather' wasn't a documentary about Mafia chief Vito Genovese. It was Marlon Brando, with Kleenex in his mouth." --Francis Ford Coppola From James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart to Marlon Brando and Robert DeNiro, Hollywood's most celebrated actors have all shared a common delight--they were at their best playing gangsters.
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