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Richard Iii Society

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July 17, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was born with a full set of teeth and grew up to have a hump on his shoulder and a withered arm. He murdered his two young nephews and was immortalized by William Shakespeare as "this poisonous hunch-backed toad." Thus has history portrayed Richard III, king of England from 1483 to 1485. But for 750 crusaders in the United States and about 4,000 converts worldwide, there has rarely been a finer fellow than this last Plantagenet king of England.
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NEWS
July 17, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was born with a full set of teeth and grew up to have a hump on his shoulder and a withered arm. He murdered his two young nephews and was immortalized by William Shakespeare as "this poisonous hunch-backed toad." Thus has history portrayed Richard III, king of England from 1483 to 1485. But for 750 crusaders in the United States and about 4,000 converts worldwide, there has rarely been a finer fellow than this last Plantagenet king of England.
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NEWS
August 22, 1985 | JACK SMITH
Today is an anniversary of deep importance to 2,000 Americans and several more thousands in Britain who believe that Richard III was a gentle man and a good king, and not the villain depicted in Shakespeare's play and other 16th-Century works. Specifically, these good people do not believe that Richard murdered the two little princes in the Tower, or ordered them murdered. On Aug.
OPINION
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Orent
Who was Richard III? We've got an idea of what he looked like thanks to a new 3-D reconstruction of his head, made after the discovery of his skull, along with the rest of his skeleton, under a parking lot in Leicester, England. But what kind of person he was remains in dispute. Was the king, who died at 32 in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, an emerging democrat and saintly protector? Or was he the "poisonous bunch-backed toad" of Shakespeare's "Richard III," an ogre who murdered his brother's sons and stole the crown, making him the most notorious usurper in English history?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
A troupe from the Mark Taper Forum has just completed a brief Japanese tour, which seems to have been a critical success. "Seems," because the translations of the Japanese reviews are a little rough. The play was a revival of the Taper's 1979 production of Ted Tally's "Terra Nova," concerning Robert F. Scott's fatal race to the South Pole.
NEWS
September 8, 1985 | JACK SMITH
Although King Richard III has been dead 500 years, the question of whether he murdered the two little princes in the Tower still arouses passions in the breasts of English-speaking people. Recently I noted that the King Richard Society would celebrate the 500th anniversary of Richard's death on Bosworth Field, and added my own presumption of his guilt. Those who consider Richard innocent can be acrimonious. "Your column this morning," writes Pat McKenna of Manhattan Beach, "is contemptible.
WORLD
September 5, 2012 | Henry Chu
A parking lot, a parking lot! His kingdom for a parking lot? OK, so those lines may not have quite the same ring as the immortal plea for a horse that Shakespeare gave Richard III as the desperate king's final cry on the battlefield. But they could well prove more accurate. Archaeologists have begun digging in the center of this historic city to locate Richard's lost remains, in a quest to solve a mystery surrounding one of the most controversial and confounding monarchs in British history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Matthew Gurewitsch, Special to The Times
Why is Antonio Salieri like Richard III? Because the man he was has disappeared behind the villain of a hit play that will not die. Richard Plantagenet at least has a political action committee -- the Richard III Society (www.richardiii.net) -- patiently laboring to clear his name. What efforts there are on Salieri's behalf -- for instance, "Antonio Salieri and Viennese Opera," a magisterial study by John A. Rice -- proceed without benefit of any master plan.
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