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Richard J Daley

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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Incumbent Richard M. Daley swamped the opposition in the Democratic mayoral primary here Tuesday, bringing him within an eyelash of resurrecting the legendary City Hall dynasty established by his father 36 years ago. In trouncing two well-known rivals, including the standard-bearer of a broad coalition of black political and community activists, the Irish-American Daley may also have quelled years of ugly, racially tinged battles for control of the nation's third-largest city.
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NATIONAL
February 26, 2003 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
With little fanfare and less opposition, Mayor Richard M. Daley coasted to his fifth term in office Tuesday, extending a reign during which he has quietly become as powerful as his blustery, more famous father was. Facing three little-known challengers with few campaign dollars, Daley won the election after running a typically low-key campaign and declining to stump in recent days, after the death of his mother, Eleanor "Sis" Daley, on Feb.
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OPINION
April 9, 1989 | Arthur Cyr, Arthur Cyr is vice president and program director of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations; these views are his own
The 1989 mayoral election in Chicago has generated exceptional but also predictable press attention far beyond the borders of Cook County. To some extent this reflects traditional fascination with Chicago politics, always by turns colorful and bizarre. No other major city in the country seems to combine such strong political polarization with such striking personalities. Added attention has been drawn, however, by the presence of Richard M. Daley, son of Richard J. Daley, the most powerful mayor in Chicago since World War II--perhaps the most powerful mayor ever.
BOOKS
June 4, 2000 | NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN, Nicholas von Hoffman is the author of "We Are the People Our Parents Warned Us Against," "Capitalist Fools: Tales of American Business From Carnegie to Forbes to the Milken Gang" and "Citizen Cohn."
Newspapers and magazines once described Chicago's Mayor Richard J. Daley as the last 19th century city boss to live in the 20th century. They were wrong. Daley was different: The caricature of a cigar-grubbing back-room dealer, surrounded by his cronies, hardly captures the uniqueness of Daley's time, place and circumstance. Like Big Bill Thompson and Ed Kelly, Chicago mayors of previous epochs, Daley and his city were synonymous during his years in power, 1955-76.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
More than 20 years have passed since Mayor Richard J. Daley gave police the infamous "shoot to kill" order after rioting erupted in the city's poorest neighborhoods, and 13 years have passed since the legendary mayor died. But attend a political rally on Chicago's South Side or listen to current black political leaders speak, and you would think those turbulent times had never faded. In the campaign for Tuesday's mayoral election, the ghost of Richard J.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
A new era of political stability began in the Windy City Wednesday as Mayor Harold Washington prepared for a second term as Chicago's strongest chief executive in a decade. Washington finished Tuesday's three-way race for mayor with 53% of the vote contrasted with 41.7% for his nearest challenger. And he ended the day with an apparent majority on the 50-member City Council.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2003 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
With little fanfare and less opposition, Mayor Richard M. Daley coasted to his fifth term in office Tuesday, extending a reign during which he has quietly become as powerful as his blustery, more famous father was. Facing three little-known challengers with few campaign dollars, Daley won the election after running a typically low-key campaign and declining to stump in recent days, after the death of his mother, Eleanor "Sis" Daley, on Feb.
BOOKS
June 4, 2000 | NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN, Nicholas von Hoffman is the author of "We Are the People Our Parents Warned Us Against," "Capitalist Fools: Tales of American Business From Carnegie to Forbes to the Milken Gang" and "Citizen Cohn."
Newspapers and magazines once described Chicago's Mayor Richard J. Daley as the last 19th century city boss to live in the 20th century. They were wrong. Daley was different: The caricature of a cigar-grubbing back-room dealer, surrounded by his cronies, hardly captures the uniqueness of Daley's time, place and circumstance. Like Big Bill Thompson and Ed Kelly, Chicago mayors of previous epochs, Daley and his city were synonymous during his years in power, 1955-76.
NEWS
November 9, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The money, muscle and influence of organized crime helped John F. Kennedy win the closely contested 1960 election, investigative journalist Seymour M. Hersh contends in a new book on the Kennedy presidency. And once Kennedy was inaugurated, Robert F. Kennedy, his brother and attorney general, refused to pursue FBI evidence into widespread voting fraud, Hersh alleges.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Cook County State's Atty. Richard M. Daley leads in the mayoral race, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson--who isn't running--would be his toughest competitor, a poll has found. Daley, son of the late Mayor Richard J. Daley, would garner 52% of the vote, while fellow Democrat Jackson would get 40% in a one-on-one race, according to results of a poll in Sunday editions of the Chicago Tribune.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Incumbent Richard M. Daley swamped the opposition in the Democratic mayoral primary here Tuesday, bringing him within an eyelash of resurrecting the legendary City Hall dynasty established by his father 36 years ago. In trouncing two well-known rivals, including the standard-bearer of a broad coalition of black political and community activists, the Irish-American Daley may also have quelled years of ugly, racially tinged battles for control of the nation's third-largest city.
OPINION
April 9, 1989 | Arthur Cyr, Arthur Cyr is vice president and program director of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations; these views are his own
The 1989 mayoral election in Chicago has generated exceptional but also predictable press attention far beyond the borders of Cook County. To some extent this reflects traditional fascination with Chicago politics, always by turns colorful and bizarre. No other major city in the country seems to combine such strong political polarization with such striking personalities. Added attention has been drawn, however, by the presence of Richard M. Daley, son of Richard J. Daley, the most powerful mayor in Chicago since World War II--perhaps the most powerful mayor ever.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
More than 20 years have passed since Mayor Richard J. Daley gave police the infamous "shoot to kill" order after rioting erupted in the city's poorest neighborhoods, and 13 years have passed since the legendary mayor died. But attend a political rally on Chicago's South Side or listen to current black political leaders speak, and you would think those turbulent times had never faded. In the campaign for Tuesday's mayoral election, the ghost of Richard J.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
A new era of political stability began in the Windy City Wednesday as Mayor Harold Washington prepared for a second term as Chicago's strongest chief executive in a decade. Washington finished Tuesday's three-way race for mayor with 53% of the vote contrasted with 41.7% for his nearest challenger. And he ended the day with an apparent majority on the 50-member City Council.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Lame-duck Mayor Eugene Sawyer today refused to endorse a candidate in next month's mayoral election, despite pressure from black leaders to throw his support behind third-party hopeful Timothy Evans. "After careful consideration, I have decided not to endorse any candidate," Sawyer said. Sawyer lost the Feb. 28 Democratic primary to Richard M. Daley, the son of Richard J. Daley, the legendary political boss who ran City Hall for 22 years.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Even former Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, wasn't exempt from the FBI's suspicion of being a communist sympathizer, a tool of the mob or an accommodator to civil rights leaders. Under a federal Freedom of Information Act request, the Chicago Tribune obtained 300 pages of Daley's file compiled by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. The reports span Daley's career from state senator in the 1940s until his death in 1976, the newspaper said.
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