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Richard J Goldstone

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NEWS
March 14, 1995 | SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as a student leader at college, Richard J. Goldstone was making news. In 1958, the young activist exposed a spy sent by South Africa's infamous security police to infiltrate the ranks of a burgeoning anti-apartheid student movement at Johannesburg's liberal University of Witwatersrand. Goldstone quizzed the woman in a sweltering campus room and recorded every word on a concealed tape recorder. Later, the tape was used as evidence in the firing of the national police commissioner.
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NEWS
March 14, 1995 | SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as a student leader at college, Richard J. Goldstone was making news. In 1958, the young activist exposed a spy sent by South Africa's infamous security police to infiltrate the ranks of a burgeoning anti-apartheid student movement at Johannesburg's liberal University of Witwatersrand. Goldstone quizzed the woman in a sweltering campus room and recorded every word on a concealed tape recorder. Later, the tape was used as evidence in the firing of the national police commissioner.
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NEWS
August 15, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after 10 one night this week, under a full moon and a clear sky, a slightly built judge and a group of lawyers ventured into the township of Boipatong to see what they could see. The conditions were not chosen by accident. It was on just such a night, two months ago, that more than 40 black men, women and children were murdered in Boipatong. This week's nocturnal visit was part of a broad effort by Judge Richard J.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although all the parties to the Bosnia peace agreement pledged Tuesday to "cooperate fully" with the U.N. War Crimes Tribunal at The Hague, it is doubtful that there will be the kind of showcase trials that condemned a dozen Nazi leaders to death in Nuremberg after World War II. The agreement states emphatically, as President Clinton put it in his nationally televised announcement Tuesday, that "those individuals charged with war crimes will be excluded from political life."
OPINION
May 19, 1996 | Diane F. Orentlicher, Diane F. Orentlicher is a professor of law and director of the War Crimes Research Office at American University
The trial of Dusan Tadic by an international war-crimes tribunal in The Hague will doubtless be a morality play, but it won't be a show trial. The tribunal's work, like the Nuremberg precedent it evokes, will be a lesson in universal conscience and individual responsibility. If it achieves its aims, the tribunal will do far more to secure lasting peace in Bosnia than the 60,000 North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops now stationed there.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a scathing report released Saturday, an independent judicial inquiry into the police slayings of five black protesters in Sebokeng last March concludes that at least 30 officers opened fire on a crowd without legal justification. The investigation, chaired by Justice Richard J. Goldstone, recommended that the attorney general consider filing criminal charges against the police officers "who shot live ammunition into the crowd . . . without an order to do so."
NEWS
March 19, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of this country's most senior police officials secretly funneled weapons to the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party and helped train black hit squads involved in political violence and terrorism, the country's most respected judicial commission announced Friday. The explosive allegations, after a six-week investigation by the independent Goldstone Commission, are the first public corroboration of frequent charges by Nelson Mandela and other critics that President Frederik W.
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