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Richard J Phelan

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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Massachusetts congressman and the special counsel to the House Ethics Committee were robbed by an armed man near the Supreme Court, police reported Wednesday. Rep. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) and Richard J. Phelan, the special counsel, were approached late Tuesday by a man armed with a revolver who demanded their wallets, U.S. Capitol police said. After the men complied, the robber fled on foot. Neither victim was injured.
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NEWS
June 1, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Jim Wright is not, by training, an attorney. But as his extraordinary address Wednesday to the jury of his peers demonstrated, the House Speaker has all the talents of a fine Texas lawyer. With his hands resting on his hips, his eyebrows flaring, his brow glistening with sweat, Wright got the chance for which he said he had "ached." The chance to "clear the air." The chance to stand up for what is "right and honorable." The chance to clear his name. Six weeks earlier, the House Ethics Committee, a panel of 12 of Wright's peers, charged the Speaker with 69 instances of financial impropriety.
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NEWS
April 18, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The House Ethics Committee ruled Monday that House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) may have been "intemperate" but that he did not violate House rules when he intervened with federal regulators on behalf of beleaguered Texas savings and loans--including an alleged attempt to have one hard-nosed official fired on grounds that he was homosexual. "While it may well be that Rep. Wright was intemperate in his dealings with representatives of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, the committee is not persuaded that there is reason to believe that he exercised undue influence in dealing with that agency," the committee's report said.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
In a stunning reversal of strategy, Rep. Jim Wright (D-Tex.) has offered privately to resign both as House Speaker and as a member of Congress if the House Ethics Committee drops major charges against him, congressional sources said Wednesday. In what amounted to a plea bargain, Wright offered to step down as Speaker immediately and to resign from the House within a few weeks, according to these sources. But the six Republicans on the 12-member committee insisted that the investigation into his personal finances should proceed.
NEWS
July 26, 1988
The House Ethics Committee today is expected to name Richard J. Phelan, a past president of the Chicago Bar Assn., to serve as special counsel in its investigation into the financial dealings of Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.), the Washington Post reported. Congressional sources said that Phelan enjoyed the support of most of the six Democrats and six Republicans on the ethics panel. But, the sources said, Phelan's ties to the Democratic Party could trigger some opposition to his appointment.
NEWS
May 5, 1989
Charges against Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) will probably go to trial before the House Ethics Committee late this month and will take seven to 10 days to complete, the panel's chairman, Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles), said. Unless there is agreement between the lawyers for Wright and the committee to do otherwise, the process will begin with a presentation of witnesses and other evidence by the committee's special outside counsel, Richard J. Phelan. Wright's lawyer will then have a chance to offer rebuttal evidence and bring Wright to the stand for a personal defense.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
House Speaker Jim Wright never knew until this week that his campaign did not pay $8,000 for use of a chartered jet in 1985 or that the plane's owner was a Texas banker who once pleaded guilty to concealing a felony, a spokesman for Wright said Friday. The Speaker acted hastily to have his campaign organization, the Wright Appreciation Committee, pay the bill last Tuesday after a Wall Street Journal reporter began to ask questions about the three-day plane trip. Wright's spokesman, Mark Johnson, said the failure to reimburse the plane's owner, Kenneth C. Hood of Dallas, was an "oversight" and insisted that the Speaker never knew who owned the plane at the time he flew in it. Staff Made Arrangements "I don't think he (Wright)
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a move designed to speed resolution of the ethics controversy in which he is embroiled, House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) proposed Sunday that he appear as early as this afternoon before the House Ethics Committee to respond to charges of violating House rules that the committee is expected to issue today. But Wright's timing was flatly rejected by Rep. John T. Myers (R-Ind.), ranking minority member of the 12-member committee, which is evenly divided between the two parties.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
The House Ethics Committee, with Democrats and Republicans united, formally charged Speaker Jim Wright today with 69 violations of the chamber's rules including what the panel's chairman called "a scheme to evade" limits on outside earnings. After a 10-month, $1.5-million investigation, the committee of six Democrats and six Republicans voted unanimously to issue a report finding "reason to believe" the Texas Democrat had run afoul of House rules requiring reporting of gifts, barring acceptance of gifts from people with a direct interest in legislation and limiting outside earned income.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service has launched a "very broad" criminal investigation into the financial affairs of House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) and his friend and former business partner, Texas developer George A. Mallick Jr., The Times learned Wednesday. Special agents from the Dallas regional office, with support and coordination from IRS headquarters in Washington, are reviewing a wide range of transactions that produced hundreds of thousands of dollars in income for the two men in recent years, according to federal sources.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
In style, it was a contest between F. Lee Bailey and Elmer Gantry, between a hard-nosed, forceful defense lawyer and an arm-waving evangelist of a prosecutor. Stephen D. Susman--in the Bailey role--argued the case Tuesday for House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) by following a tried-and-true litigator's rule: If the facts seem to be against you, argue the law. Without challenging the acts with which Wright has been charged, Susman insisted that House ethics rules simply do not apply to Wright's conduct.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Internal Revenue Service has launched a "very broad" criminal investigation into the financial affairs of House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) and his friend and former business partner, Texas developer George A. Mallick Jr., The Times learned Wednesday. Special agents from the Dallas regional office, with support and coordination from IRS headquarters in Washington, are reviewing a wide range of transactions that produced hundreds of thousands of dollars in income for the two men in recent years, according to federal sources.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) and a newly expanded team of attorneys launched his defense against misconduct charges Tuesday with a hard-hitting attack on the integrity and legal ability of Richard J. Phelan, special counsel to the House Ethics Committee. While sparing the panel members, Wright used exceptionally strong language in accusing Phelan of distorting testimony of witnesses and telling "a lie, a falsehood" about the issue of whether his wife, Betty, worked for a total of $72,000 in salary or received it as a gift.
NEWS
May 5, 1989
Charges against Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) will probably go to trial before the House Ethics Committee late this month and will take seven to 10 days to complete, the panel's chairman, Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles), said. Unless there is agreement between the lawyers for Wright and the committee to do otherwise, the process will begin with a presentation of witnesses and other evidence by the committee's special outside counsel, Richard J. Phelan. Wright's lawyer will then have a chance to offer rebuttal evidence and bring Wright to the stand for a personal defense.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
House Speaker Jim Wright never knew until this week that his campaign did not pay $8,000 for use of a chartered jet in 1985 or that the plane's owner was a Texas banker who once pleaded guilty to concealing a felony, a spokesman for Wright said Friday. The Speaker acted hastily to have his campaign organization, the Wright Appreciation Committee, pay the bill last Tuesday after a Wall Street Journal reporter began to ask questions about the three-day plane trip. Wright's spokesman, Mark Johnson, said the failure to reimburse the plane's owner, Kenneth C. Hood of Dallas, was an "oversight" and insisted that the Speaker never knew who owned the plane at the time he flew in it. Staff Made Arrangements "I don't think he (Wright)
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
House Speaker Jim Wright's business partner said Friday that an oil deal under scrutiny by the House Ethics Committee was legitimate, despite implications of misconduct because $341,000 was made in a single day on what turned out to be a dry well. George A. Mallick Jr., a Ft. Worth millionaire and longtime friend of the Speaker, divulged for the first time Friday his version of the events that led to the sale of a share of an oil well to a German investment company, Union Rheinische Petroleum Inc.--a transaction that is now a focal point of the investigation by the committee into the financial affairs of the Speaker.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Richard J. Phelan, a Chicago Democrat, was chosen Tuesday by the House Ethics Committee to act as independent counsel in the investigation of allegations that House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) used his position to benefit himself and Texas cronies. The appointment brought a howl of protest from Wright's chief accuser, Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
In style, it was a contest between F. Lee Bailey and Elmer Gantry, between a hard-nosed, forceful defense lawyer and an arm-waving evangelist of a prosecutor. Stephen D. Susman--in the Bailey role--argued the case Tuesday for House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) by following a tried-and-true litigator's rule: If the facts seem to be against you, argue the law. Without challenging the acts with which Wright has been charged, Susman insisted that House ethics rules simply do not apply to Wright's conduct.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The House Ethics Committee ruled Monday that House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) may have been "intemperate" but that he did not violate House rules when he intervened with federal regulators on behalf of beleaguered Texas savings and loans--including an alleged attempt to have one hard-nosed official fired on grounds that he was homosexual. "While it may well be that Rep. Wright was intemperate in his dealings with representatives of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, the committee is not persuaded that there is reason to believe that he exercised undue influence in dealing with that agency," the committee's report said.
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a move designed to speed resolution of the ethics controversy in which he is embroiled, House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) proposed Sunday that he appear as early as this afternoon before the House Ethics Committee to respond to charges of violating House rules that the committee is expected to issue today. But Wright's timing was flatly rejected by Rep. John T. Myers (R-Ind.), ranking minority member of the 12-member committee, which is evenly divided between the two parties.
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