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Richard J Riordan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989
Alan Gershman is a liberal Democrat who has totally devoted himself to the education of young people in Los Angeles. Gershman's one sin (other than being a liberal Democrat) is that he has refused to give his body and soul to UTLA President Wayne Johnson and his union. With Gershman defeated in the April 11 election for the Los Angeles school board, the unions will own the school board lock, stock and barrel. Irrespective of the merits of the current wage dispute, this conflict of interest would very obviously be an unhealthy situation--unhealthy for the taxpayers, the voters and, in particular, the children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2009 | Jean Merl
Nancy M. Daly, a widely respected children's advocate, philanthropist and arts leader in Los Angeles, has died. She was 68. Daly, who had high-profile marriages to entertainment executive Robert A. Daly and former Los Angeles Mayor Richard J. Riordan, had been battling pancreatic cancer. She died Friday in St. Louis while traveling back to Los Angeles from New York in a motor home with her three adult children. "It's exactly what she wanted," her daughter Linda Daly said Saturday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2002 | Steve Lopez
I'm standing outside the Richard J. Riordan Central Library in downtown Los Angeles, asking people if they know who's running for governor of California. "The mayor is running," one guy tells me. What mayor is that? I ask. "Whatzisname. Bill Hahn is running." "I've been taking a look at the issues," says another man. But who's running? I ask again. "It's, no, wait a minute. Who's that one guy?" Two thoughts come to mind. First, I'm seriously reconsidering my belief that we need to get more citizens involved in the political process.
OPINION
July 28, 2006
Re "A Denver Billionaire's Invisible Hand," July 23 It was about time that Los Angeles' new superhero, Philip Anschutz, was introduced to the public. Underneath his anonymous, mysterious personality is a person who loves jogging and biking with his friends more than I do. My first meeting with Anschutz took place in the mayor's office. I and others begged him to ignore sites for a new sports arena in Inglewood, Orange County, Carson and other places that were considered more desirable for attracting sports fans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993
In the wake of a new Los Angeles mayoral poll putting him within striking distance of front-runner Michael Woo, Richard J. Riordan will begin airing his fourth TV ad today. THE AD: Riordan projects an executive image, delivering his remarks from behind a desk in an oak-paneled office. Looking into the camera, he says, "L.A.'s facing a $500-million deficit. Now, the politicians want to raise taxes and take 500 police off the street. I know how to eliminate deficits."
OPINION
July 28, 2006
Re "A Denver Billionaire's Invisible Hand," July 23 It was about time that Los Angeles' new superhero, Philip Anschutz, was introduced to the public. Underneath his anonymous, mysterious personality is a person who loves jogging and biking with his friends more than I do. My first meeting with Anschutz took place in the mayor's office. I and others begged him to ignore sites for a new sports arena in Inglewood, Orange County, Carson and other places that were considered more desirable for attracting sports fans.
OPINION
March 21, 1993
In response to "Riordan Was Key Backer of Measure He Shuns," March 17: The primary reason for my financial support of Measure H, the public matching funds measure approved by Los Angeles voters in 1990, was to dilute the influence of special interest donors at City Hall. But the reform idea behind taxpayer funding of city elections, to increase competition and reduce the influence of lobbyists, is off to a very poor start in the campaign for mayor. As The Times reported on Feb. 16, the first election under new laws intended to dilute special interest influence suggests that most of my major opponents, all elected officials, are relying on entrenched networks of city-related business interests to help fill their coffers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994
In response to "Thrifty Slams Riordan on Way Out of Town," April 21: The decision by Leonard Green and Partners to move a newly formed Thrifty/Payless headquarters from Los Angeles to Oregon should be portrayed as what it is: a business decision, made by venture capitalists and bankers months ago that had nothing to do with the merits of Los Angeles as a place to conduct business. The consolidation in Oregon was disclosed in documents relating to the merger's financing, and industry analysts were told that the headquarters would locate in Oregon to achieve cost-savings.
OPINION
February 6, 2000
Re "Casualties in the Mayor's Brawl With the Council," Opinion, Jan. 30: Xandra Kayden's article was laden with sweeping, inaccurate characterizations and demonstrated a lack of understanding of the mayor's authority under both the current and new city charters. The current charter requires that the mayor "exercise a close supervision over all its affairs." The new charter brings more accountability to city government by designating the mayor as the chief executive officer of the city.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1988 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Richard J. Riordan, a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, investor and restaurant owner, has resigned from Riordan Freeman & Spogli, a 5-year-old firm he co-founded that specializes in leveraged buyouts. Riordan, 58, said Friday that his departure from the firm, which earlier this year sold its interest in Boys Markets, was prompted by philosophical differences between him and his two partners.
OPINION
May 17, 2003
Re "The After-School Puzzle," editorial, May 10: Sacramento and Washington miss the whole point -- sending billions of dollars to local school districts does not magically transform children; after-school programs must be well managed. That is the secret of former Mayor Tom Bradley's LA's BEST, where the children have significantly better grades, miss fewer days of school and get in less trouble. The L.A. Unified School District, until recently, squandered tens of millions of dollars a year on after-school programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2002 | Steve Lopez
I'm standing outside the Richard J. Riordan Central Library in downtown Los Angeles, asking people if they know who's running for governor of California. "The mayor is running," one guy tells me. What mayor is that? I ask. "Whatzisname. Bill Hahn is running." "I've been taking a look at the issues," says another man. But who's running? I ask again. "It's, no, wait a minute. Who's that one guy?" Two thoughts come to mind. First, I'm seriously reconsidering my belief that we need to get more citizens involved in the political process.
OPINION
February 6, 2000
Re "Casualties in the Mayor's Brawl With the Council," Opinion, Jan. 30: Xandra Kayden's article was laden with sweeping, inaccurate characterizations and demonstrated a lack of understanding of the mayor's authority under both the current and new city charters. The current charter requires that the mayor "exercise a close supervision over all its affairs." The new charter brings more accountability to city government by designating the mayor as the chief executive officer of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1996
I'd like to thank Robert Jones (Essay, May 22) for pointing out some of the very good arguments against Valley secession. For the record, however, I'd like to clean up one very basic point: I opposed secession from the start. While I understand people's frustration with government, I do not believe secession is the answer. In the Valley and throughout the city, Angelenos have felt shortchanged for years. That's why I ran for mayor in 1993; that's why I've fought to shake up the bureaucracy and chart a new course for Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994
In response to "Thrifty Slams Riordan on Way Out of Town," April 21: The decision by Leonard Green and Partners to move a newly formed Thrifty/Payless headquarters from Los Angeles to Oregon should be portrayed as what it is: a business decision, made by venture capitalists and bankers months ago that had nothing to do with the merits of Los Angeles as a place to conduct business. The consolidation in Oregon was disclosed in documents relating to the merger's financing, and industry analysts were told that the headquarters would locate in Oregon to achieve cost-savings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993
In the wake of a new Los Angeles mayoral poll putting him within striking distance of front-runner Michael Woo, Richard J. Riordan will begin airing his fourth TV ad today. THE AD: Riordan projects an executive image, delivering his remarks from behind a desk in an oak-paneled office. Looking into the camera, he says, "L.A.'s facing a $500-million deficit. Now, the politicians want to raise taxes and take 500 police off the street. I know how to eliminate deficits."
OPINION
December 18, 1988
I'd like to respond to your Nov. 30 editorial "Educational Fast Track." In recent years I have been concerned about how best to accomplish change in our public education system. Conflicting feelings of frustration versus a sense of imperative to act are now common among community leaders in all sectors: educators, politicians, business leaders and employers. But we should not fall into the trap of debating one approach to the problem versus another, as was implied in your editorial.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1988
Some reactions to Drexel Burnham Lambert's decision to plead guilty to six felony counts of securities law violations and to pay a record $650-million fine: Martin Mayer, author of "Markets" and other books on finance: "The most interesting aspect of this is what happens to ("junk bond" king Michael) Milken. I should imagine this means they've sold Milken down the river. "On the Street generally, God knows what the reaction will be. This is the other shoe dropping. . . .
OPINION
March 21, 1993
In response to "Riordan Was Key Backer of Measure He Shuns," March 17: The primary reason for my financial support of Measure H, the public matching funds measure approved by Los Angeles voters in 1990, was to dilute the influence of special interest donors at City Hall. But the reform idea behind taxpayer funding of city elections, to increase competition and reduce the influence of lobbyists, is off to a very poor start in the campaign for mayor. As The Times reported on Feb. 16, the first election under new laws intended to dilute special interest influence suggests that most of my major opponents, all elected officials, are relying on entrenched networks of city-related business interests to help fill their coffers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989
Alan Gershman is a liberal Democrat who has totally devoted himself to the education of young people in Los Angeles. Gershman's one sin (other than being a liberal Democrat) is that he has refused to give his body and soul to UTLA President Wayne Johnson and his union. With Gershman defeated in the April 11 election for the Los Angeles school board, the unions will own the school board lock, stock and barrel. Irrespective of the merits of the current wage dispute, this conflict of interest would very obviously be an unhealthy situation--unhealthy for the taxpayers, the voters and, in particular, the children.
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