Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard J Stegemeier
IN THE NEWS

Richard J Stegemeier

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Plain-spoken Fred L. Hartley relinquished his final leadership post at Unocal Corp. on Monday, handing the title of chairman over to Richard J. Stegemeier, president and chief executive. Hartley, who relinquished the titles of president and chief executive when he retired in July, 1988, will continue as a non-employee member of the board. Speaking to shareholders at the company's annual meeting in Los Angeles on Monday, Hartley, 72, said he asked the board to elect a new chairman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 3, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp., the troubled Los Angeles-based oil company, Tuesday named company veteran Roger C. Beach to the positions of president and chief operating officer. The appointment of Beach, 55, to the company's No. 3 spot elicited little surprise among oil analysts. Many predicted the move could lead to Beach's replacement of Unocal's current Chairman and Chief Executive Richard J. Stegemeier upon his retirement. "It's the first step of a succession outline," said Michael C.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 3, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp., the troubled Los Angeles-based oil company, Tuesday named company veteran Roger C. Beach to the positions of president and chief operating officer. The appointment of Beach, 55, to the company's No. 3 spot elicited little surprise among oil analysts. Many predicted the move could lead to Beach's replacement of Unocal's current Chairman and Chief Executive Richard J. Stegemeier upon his retirement. "It's the first step of a succession outline," said Michael C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A top Los Angeles oil executive took aim Wednesday at a far-reaching plan to clean up Southern California's air, calling it an example of "popular hysteria" that has spawned today's renascent environmental movement. Richard J.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Unocal hung a for-sale sign Wednesday on its headquarters building and 13 acres of downtown Los Angeles real estate, saying it would use the money to reduce debt and look for oil and gas. Analysts and brokers said the property could fetch $150 million or more. The company also disclosed plans to sell real estate in San Diego County and industrial holdings in the South Bay area and the Pacific Northwest, calling it part of a new program to put its money to better use.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
When Forbes magazine ran a particularly tough article this summer about Fred L. Hartley, then chief executive of Unocal, New York analyst Philip Popkin's quotes were highly critical. Popkin is not just any analyst. He is the energy analyst for the College Retirement Equities Fund, which is Unocal's 12th-largest stockholder with nearly 1.4 million shares. Responding in the article, Hartley snorted that analysts are "peons."
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unocal Cuts 85 Headquarters Jobs: Unocal Corp. eliminated 85 jobs at its headquarters in a restructuring expected to save $20 million a year. The belt-tightening among the 920-employee Los Angeles staff followed three months of study, Chairman Richard J. Stegemeier said. Last summer, it said it would lay off 100 of 780 employees at its research facility in Brea.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Plain-spoken Fred L. Hartley relinquished his final leadership post at Unocal Corp. on Monday, handing the title of chairman over to Richard J. Stegemeier, president and chief executive. Hartley, who relinquished the titles of president and chief executive when he retired in July, 1988, will continue as a non-employee member of the board. Speaking to shareholders at the company's annual meeting in Los Angeles on Monday, Hartley, 72, said he asked the board to elect a new chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A top Los Angeles oil executive took aim Wednesday at a far-reaching plan to clean up Southern California's air, calling it an example of "popular hysteria" that has spawned today's renascent environmental movement. Richard J.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
When Forbes magazine ran a particularly tough article this summer about Fred L. Hartley, then chief executive of Unocal, New York analyst Philip Popkin's quotes were highly critical. Popkin is not just any analyst. He is the energy analyst for the College Retirement Equities Fund, which is Unocal's 12th-largest stockholder with nearly 1.4 million shares. Responding in the article, Hartley snorted that analysts are "peons."
BUSINESS
July 7, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Unocal hung a for-sale sign Wednesday on its headquarters building and 13 acres of downtown Los Angeles real estate, saying it would use the money to reduce debt and look for oil and gas. Analysts and brokers said the property could fetch $150 million or more. The company also disclosed plans to sell real estate in San Diego County and industrial holdings in the South Bay area and the Pacific Northwest, calling it part of a new program to put its money to better use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001
Re "Weather Rewrote Record Books," Jan. 6: So the November-December period was the coldest on record in the nation. Nonsense! Can't be. Global warming is raging across the planet, we are told, because greenhouse gases are 30% higher than they were 100 years ago. Ergo, it must get hotter each year and cannot, under any circumstances, get colder. Unless, of course, there are other unreported factors that affect climate change. I'll turn my electric blanket up a notch tonight. Tomorrow morning, if I find an ice cube by my feet, I may believe the global-warming theory after all. RICHARD J. STEGEMEIER Anaheim
Los Angeles Times Articles
|