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Richard Jewell

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"The Wolf of Wall Street" stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill are reportedly headed back to the big screen together, this time in an adaptation of the 1997 Vanity Fair article "The Ballad of Richard Jewell," about the man falsely accused of being the 1996 Atlanta Olympics bomber. According to Deadline Hollywood , Fox has acquired the rights to Marie Brenner's article and will develop it for Hill to portray Jewell, a security guard who was initially hailed as a hero after discovering a backpack bomb and helping to evacuate bystanders.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"The Wolf of Wall Street" stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill are reportedly headed back to the big screen together, this time in an adaptation of the 1997 Vanity Fair article "The Ballad of Richard Jewell," about the man falsely accused of being the 1996 Atlanta Olympics bomber. According to Deadline Hollywood , Fox has acquired the rights to Marie Brenner's article and will develop it for Hill to portray Jewell, a security guard who was initially hailed as a hero after discovering a backpack bomb and helping to evacuate bystanders.
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NEWS
November 20, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day meant to highlight the United States' role in the Pacific, the flap over campaign financing reached across the ocean to Australia, where President Clinton cautioned reporters to remember the example of Richard Jewell, a symbol of false accusation in Atlanta's Olympic Park bombing.
OPINION
April 18, 2013 | Meghan Daum
As social media sites have pelted out news of the Boston bombing, playing fast and loose with the numbers of the dead and injured and amplifying hearsay into a cacophony of confusion, one tweet seemed to say it all: "Dear Journalism: Get yourself together and report verified facts or don't report anything at all. " It was retweeted 34 times, a fraction of the number claiming that a U.S. bomb had "just" killed 30 people at a wedding in Afghanistan....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Richard Jewell, the former security guard who was wrongly identified as a suspect in a fatal bombing at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, died Wednesday morning at his home in Meriwether County, Ga., according to the local coroner. He was 44. Jewell had been suffering from health problems including diabetes and kidney trouble, said Coroner Johnny Worley. Since 2003, Jewell had been a deputy in the Meriwether County Sheriff's Department, where he was on disability leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997 | CHELSEA J. CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richard Jewell just wanted to be an anonymous fan at a recent Atlanta Braves baseball game. No such luck. "Are you going to blow up the new stadium too?" a group taunted the former Olympic security guard. Nearly a year after the bombing at Centennial Olympic Park, Jewell is fueled by anger. He spends most of his days reliving the nightmare. His career aspirations and social life are over, and his good nature has been replaced by paranoia and distrust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996
Let's see if I have this correct: Being in the FBI means you never have to say you're sorry. Sorry about that, Richard Jewell! JEAN LEWIS Los Angeles
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
The newspaper that first identified Richard Jewell as a suspect in the Olympic park bombing stood by its coverage Friday and refused the security guard's request for a retraction. "It was not illegal, immoral or unethical to publish the story about the FBI's investigation of Richard Jewell," Roger S. Kintzel, publisher of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution said in a statement.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Jewell, the onetime suspect in the Centennial Olympic Park bombing, said he has abandoned his dream of becoming a police officer. "I'm ruined. No police chief wants someone working for them that has had the press that I've had," he said in Atlanta. Jewell, a security guard during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, was named a suspect three days after the July 27 bombing, which killed one person and injured more than 100 others.
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time magazine expressed its regret about possible inaccuracies in its coverage of Richard Jewell, and the magazine said the onetime suspect in the Atlanta Olympics bombing has agreed not to sue. The regret was expressed in a clarification published in the magazine's Aug. 25 issue. No monetary payment was involved in the settlement, said Diana Pearson, a spokeswoman for Time, which is owned by Time Warner Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It starts with a dead man. Rich, powerful and headless, Richard Jewell is sprawled across his desk, his hands still grasping one of his well-polished shotguns. There is no small amount of glee in Benjamin Black's description of the scene — "he lay with a bit of jawbone and a few teeth and a bloodied stump of spine, all that was left of what had been his head" — and that's partly because he's the pulpy alter-ego of Irish novelist John Banville. Known for his layered, intelligent writing, the Man Booker Prize-winning author sets aside literary ambitions and dons a black fedora when he becomes Benjamin Black, detective novelist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Richard Jewell, the former security guard who was wrongly identified as a suspect in a fatal bombing at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, died Wednesday morning at his home in Meriwether County, Ga., according to the local coroner. He was 44. Jewell had been suffering from health problems including diabetes and kidney trouble, said Coroner Johnny Worley. Since 2003, Jewell had been a deputy in the Meriwether County Sheriff's Department, where he was on disability leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001
It was bad enough when the FBI lost track of thousands of documents that should have been turned over to lawyers for Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. Now comes the more embarrassing disclosure that over the last 11 years it has lost hundreds of weapons and laptop computers, some to theft, some to retired or fired employees who took equipment with them, some to sloppy inventory controls. Significantly, the survey of lost equipment didn't originate with the FBI.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2001
For decades, the Federal Bureau of Investigation was virtually immune from criticism in official Washington, not because certain of its activities didn't merit censure but because of the thick protective wall behind which it operated. Under its founding director, J. Edgar Hoover, the bureau's formidable public-relations machine created a highly buffed image of competence and invariable success in dealing with crime and subversion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | CHERYL LU-LIEN TAN, BALTIMORE SUN
The face staring from the CD cover seems familiar--well, except that Uncle Junior on "The Sopranos" usually isn't partial to relaxing, much less smiling. And his suburban New Jersey sensibilities never would have led him to don a sleek black turtleneck. But the person on the cover of the recently released "Hits" is Dominic Chianese, who plays Corrado "Junior" Soprano on the popular HBO series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A glance at the near future . . . Message from the dean: Thank you for your interest in Paparazzi University's extended learning program for working professionals who wish to enhance their careers in journalism and open doors to the future by returning to the classroom. It was our pleasure to have sent you this catalog for spring 1999. We at PU are proud of our faculty and of the rich and versatile resource we are providing journalists as they face the challenges of the new millennium.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge, who says he believes that Richard Jewell is no longer a suspect in the Centennial Olympic Park bombing, has ordered officials to release sealed documents showing why the former security guard fell under suspicion in the first place. U.S. District Judge Owen Forrester gave the Justice Department one week to challenge his order in a higher court or unseal FBI affidavits used to obtain warrants to search Jewell's property.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FBI agents took hair samples and fingerprints from security guard Richard Jewell but were turned down by his lawyer when they asked to make a tape recording of his voice. Jewell is considered a suspect in the Centennial Olympic Park bombing in Atlanta that killed Alice Hawthorne, 44, of Albany, Ga., and injured more than 100.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1998
The headline, "Sexual Allegations Damage Clinton's Popularity Rating" (Jan. 25), suggests a number of rather serious questions. What does anything on these tapes have to do with Whitewater? Since the only two parties who have access to the tapes are Kenneth Starr's office of independent counsel and his chief witness, who is the source of the leaks? Since the leaks have generated enough publicity to endanger a fair trial of anyone accused on them, what is the purpose of such leaks? Does anyone in the press remember the name Richard Jewell?
NEWS
August 20, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time magazine expressed its regret about possible inaccuracies in its coverage of Richard Jewell, and the magazine said the onetime suspect in the Atlanta Olympics bombing has agreed not to sue. The regret was expressed in a clarification published in the magazine's Aug. 25 issue. No monetary payment was involved in the settlement, said Diana Pearson, a spokeswoman for Time, which is owned by Time Warner Inc.
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