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Richard Jr Bourassa

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MAGAZINE
February 3, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE and MATT LAIT, Nancy Wride and Matt Lait are Times staff writers in Orange County
SEPT. 12, 1986, SHORTLY AFTER 4 P.M. Two seventh-graders, Richard Bourassa and Jeffrey Bush, are playing after school. They are alone in the den of Richard's Anaheim Hills home, a pair of 13-year-olds training loaded guns on each other. The barrels touch. Suddenly, Richard later tells police, the 12-gauge shotgun in his arms goes off, spraying the room with buckshot. One pellet pierces the door. Another shatters the window. And several riddle Jeffrey's body and head.
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NEWS
November 9, 1991 | MATT LAIT and MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Anaheim Hills teen-ager, who admitted murdering a classmate four years after fatally shooting another school friend under eerily similar circumstances, was sentenced Friday to 18 years to life in prison. After listening to emotional statements from the fathers of the two victims, Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald gave Richard H. Bourassa Jr.
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NEWS
November 9, 1991 | MATT LAIT and MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Anaheim Hills teen-ager, who admitted murdering a classmate four years after fatally shooting another school friend under eerily similar circumstances, was sentenced Friday to 18 years to life in prison. After listening to emotional statements from the fathers of the two victims, Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald gave Richard H. Bourassa Jr.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | MATT LAIT and MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Anaheim Hills teen-ager, who admitted murdering a classmate four years after fatally shooting another school friend under eerily similar circumstances, was sentenced Friday to 18 years to life in prison. After listening to emotional statements from the fathers of the two victims, Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald gave Richard H. Bourassa Jr.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | MATT LAIT and MARK PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Anaheim Hills teen-ager, who admitted murdering a classmate four years after fatally shooting another school friend under eerily similar circumstances, was sentenced Friday to 18 years to life in prison. After listening to emotional statements from the fathers of the two victims, Superior Court Judge Robert R. Fitzgerald gave Richard H. Bourassa Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1990 | NANCY WRIDE
Citing his "potential danger" to others, a judge Monday ordered a 17-year-old Anaheim Hills boy who killed two classmates in separate shootings to be held in Orange County Juvenile Hall pending his murder trial. Richard H. Bourassa Jr., who was not charged until last Friday with the May 24 killing of 17-year-old Christian Wiedepuhl in the Bourassa family home, had been attending high school in San Bernardino County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge in the murder trial of Richard H. Bourassa Jr., the Anaheim youth who fatally shot a classmate four years after killing another friend, dealt a tactical blow to the defense Friday by ruling that details of the first incident could be admitted as evidence. "How many crimes do I have to defend against here?" said Bourassa's attorney, Edward W. Hall, after a two-day pretrial hearing. "(The first shooting) is extremely prejudicial."
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN
'You do appreciate that it's time to stop shooting people, is that correct?" Superior Court Judge Robert Fitzgerald asked the defendant in accepting his guilty plea to a murder in the second degree. The defendant, Richard Bourassa Jr., said that he did. He'd already shot and killed two boys who had considered him their friend. The killings, four years apart, took place under the guise of boys just being that, of playing around with Daddy's gun. Bourassa is 18 years old now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | MATT LAIT
Richard H. Bourassa Jr., the 17-year-old Anaheim boy charged with murdering a classmate four years after he fatally shot another classmate, was ordered Wednesday to remain in custody at Orange County Juvenile Hall pending a hearing next month to determine whether he should be tried as an adult.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN
'You do appreciate that it's time to stop shooting people, is that correct?" Superior Court Judge Robert Fitzgerald asked the defendant in accepting his guilty plea to a murder in the second degree. The defendant, Richard Bourassa Jr., said that he did. He'd already shot and killed two boys who had considered him their friend. The killings, four years apart, took place under the guise of boys just being that, of playing around with Daddy's gun. Bourassa is 18 years old now.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite having pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, Richard H. Bourassa Jr. maintained Wednesday that he accidentally shot a friend to death, and that he said otherwise in court only in hope of winning time at the California Youth Authority instead of prison. In an hourlong interview at the Orange County Jail, Bourassa, 18, told The Times he is not guilty of murder. "Not at all," he said firmly. "The reason I made the plea . . .
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move, an Anaheim Hills teen-ager who shot a friend to death five years ago pleaded guilty Monday to second-degree murder for killing another classmate under eerily similar circumstances. "This caught me as a complete surprise," said Deputy Dist. Atty. Kathi Harper after Richard H. Bourassa Jr., 18, entered his guilty plea for the May 24, 1990, death of 17-year-old Christian Wiedepuhl. Defense attorney Edward W.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | Times researcher Elena Brunet
Sept. 12, 1986. Richard H. Bourassa Jr. and Jeffrey A. Bush, both 13, are playing with a 12-gauge shotgun and a .22-caliber rifle shortly after 4 p.m. in Bourassa's Anaheim Hills home when the shotgun Bourassa is holding fires, spraying the room with buckshot and hitting Jeffrey in the body and head. There are no witnesses. Police later rule the death accidental. May 24, 1990.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move, an Anaheim Hills teen-ager pleaded guilty Monday to second-degree murder in the shooting death of a 17-year-old classmate who was slain four years after the defendant fatally shot another friend in the same room. "This caught me as a complete surprise," said Deputy Dist. Atty. Kathi Harper after Richard H. Bourassa Jr., 18, entered his guilty plea for the death last May of Christian Wiedepuhl of Anaheim Hills. Defense attorney Edward W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge in the murder trial of Richard H. Bourassa Jr., the Anaheim youth who fatally shot a classmate four years after killing another friend, dealt a tactical blow to the defense Friday by ruling that details of the first incident could be admitted as evidence. "How many crimes do I have to defend against here?" said Bourassa's attorney, Edward W. Hall, after a two-day pretrial hearing. "(The first shooting) is extremely prejudicial."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990 | NANCY WRIDE and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A judge Thursday ordered 17-year-old Richard H. Bourassa Jr. to stand trial on a murder charge stemming from the shooting death of his friend, the second classmate killed by Bourassa in his home since 1986. In her decision, North Orange County Municipal Judge Margaret R. Anderson said that Bourassa's explanation of the May 24 shooting of Christian Wiedepuhl, 17, was "rather an incredible version" of the events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Richard H. Bourassa Jr., the Anaheim youth charged with murdering a classmate four years after he fatally shot another classmate, was ordered Wednesday to remain in Orange County Juvenile Hall pending a hearing next month to determine whether he should be tried as an adult. Saying that he "made the right decision" on Monday when he first ordered the youth detained, Juvenile Court Judge Michael Brenner denied the request of Bourassa's attorney that the youth be released to his parents.
MAGAZINE
February 3, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE and MATT LAIT, Nancy Wride and Matt Lait are Times staff writers in Orange County
SEPT. 12, 1986, SHORTLY AFTER 4 P.M. Two seventh-graders, Richard Bourassa and Jeffrey Bush, are playing after school. They are alone in the den of Richard's Anaheim Hills home, a pair of 13-year-olds training loaded guns on each other. The barrels touch. Suddenly, Richard later tells police, the 12-gauge shotgun in his arms goes off, spraying the room with buckshot. One pellet pierces the door. Another shatters the window. And several riddle Jeffrey's body and head.
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