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Richard Keit

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November 2, 2000
* Family--Performances to Grow On will present the Utah-based Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company on Nov. 10 at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza's Scherr Forum, 2100 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. The troupe will stage its "Circle Cycle" production using hoops, balls, scarves and more than 200 slides to create a visual tapestry. Show time: 7 p.m. $20 adults; $14 children, regardless of age. 646-8907. * Latin Rhythms--The Latin Leopards Tour 2000 will make a stop Nov.
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MAGAZINE
May 22, 2005 | Ann Herold
Of course they love the people "gone" on tile, although they often have to be the ones to tell them not to overdo it, that a bench or fountain here or there as a "surprise" might be preferable to paving over paradise. Then again, some of the more spectacular pieces that Richard Keit and Mary Kennedy have done in their careers as tile artisans (26 years for him, 15 for her) include the large outdoor "rugs" like the one going next to the pool at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2003 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Being friends with Ojai artist John Nava has its rewards. For Gerd Koch, it meant that his deeply lined, expressive face was put on a 20-foot-high image of St. Nicholas and hung in the enormous new cathedral in downtown Los Angeles. Barring some catastrophe, Koch's saintly visage will probably stare down from the walls of Our Lady of the Angels for 500 years. "I was overwhelmed," said Koch, 74, co-founder of Studio Channel Islands Art Center at Cal State Channel Islands in Camarillo.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | ZAN THOMPSON
A breakthrough far more important than opening the Jonathan Club and California Club to women happened in Avalon on Catalina Island on Oct. 17. While the belligerent women were crowing about riding in the main elevators in those two lofty men's clubs, they were missing the real leap forward for equality. For the first time in 40 years, women were invited to attend the gathering of the Beverly Hills High School Athletic Supporters Society meeting 26 miles across the sea beside the bay.
HOME & GARDEN
January 4, 1997 | BARBARA DeMARCO BARRETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most homes have tile, usually of the bland, mass-produced type found on shower walls or kitchen counters. But there is a beautiful side to tile. Gorgeous handmade tile that's a feast for the eyes adds a sense of excitement to a home. It brings to mind times when elaborate care was given to building houses, when the work of artisans was treasured, when mass production had not reached its zenith.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 1987 | STEVE HENSON, Steve Henson is a Times staff writer.
Richard Thomas Keit gingerly pulled the last rack of cooled ceramic tiles from his kiln, eyed each one carefully and determined that, yes, the glaze colors matched those of the first six firings. The set of 8x8-inch stoneware-quality tile, colored with Keit's own glaze formulas, had cooked for 36 hours, reaching a peak temperature of 1,860 degrees Fahrenheit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tile artist Richard Thomas Keit was looking for a roomier place when he moved his home and studio from one part of Thousand Oaks to another a year and a half ago. Since quitting his job at a computer company in 1980, Keit has devoted full time to making ceramic tiles based on Art Deco and old Malibu designs. Keit's much-admired tile work has been installed at celebrities' residences and can be seen in public buildings at Glendale City College and on Santa Catalina Island.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Today Malibu means surf, sand and movie stars. Fifty years ago, it meant tile. From 1926 to 1932, Malibu Potteries, located right on the beach in Santa Monica, produced some of the most prized ceramic tile in the United States. Hand-glazed in colors a parrot might envy, the tiles were available in more than 1,000 designs, including lines called Moorish and Saracen that echoed the traditional Islamic patterns of Moorish Spain and the Middle East.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, Times Staff Writer
Catalina blue. Descanso green. Toyon red. Manchu yellow. Decorative tile in those shimmering hues is almost everywhere the eye alights in Avalon--its primitive-style artwork defining and highlighting the Santa Catalina Island town.
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