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Richard Kreimer

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November 26, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On most mornings, Richard Kreimer rises from his sleeping bag in the woods, zips on a filthy parka and walks into town to call his lawyers. Pulling crumpled notes from his pockets, the disheveled homeless man also dials TV hosts, publishers and movie producers. As he pumps coins into a pay phone near City Hall, police watch with suspicion. Pedestrians make obscene gestures, then walk away in disgust. Across the street, a mother with small children sees Kreimer and hurries by.
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NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On most mornings, Richard Kreimer rises from his sleeping bag in the woods, zips on a filthy parka and walks into town to call his lawyers. Pulling crumpled notes from his pockets, the disheveled homeless man also dials TV hosts, publishers and movie producers. As he pumps coins into a pay phone near City Hall, police watch with suspicion. Pedestrians make obscene gestures, then walk away in disgust. Across the street, a mother with small children sees Kreimer and hurries by.
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NEWS
March 22, 1992 | HENRY STERN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After more than a decade on the street, Richard Kreimer is about to become rich. Kreimer, 42, sued a library that wanted him banned because he smelled and stared, and the police, who he said harassed him. He settled for at least $250,000. Supporters hail him as a champion of the homeless; critics call him a money-hungry publicity hound. Kreimer just wants to retreat from the spotlight and get his life together. "It will be the most difficult job of my entire life," he said in a recent interview.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN
BACKGROUND: Richard Kreimer, a homeless man in Morristown, N.J., sued the small town for harassment and won $230,000. The court ruled that it was unconstitutional for the Morristown library to evict Kreimer or other homeless people because of body odor or odd behavior. That ruling set off a furor among libraries across the country, triggering a debate over the rights of the homeless versus those of other patrons. UPDATE: Kreimer has finally lost a round in his legal battles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2005 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Librarians in San Luis Obispo County have long had a policy of politely asking guests with offensive body odor to leave. Now a new ordinance makes that policy a law. "The point is to make [the library] a comfortable, safe place for everyone to use," said Moe McGee, assistant director of the San Luis Obispo City-County Library. The prohibition against offensive body odor is part of a list of banned activities that was implemented by librarians in 1994.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When the Los Angeles Central Library reopens this fall, seven years after an arsonist set it on fire, it will have all the accouterments of a modern library--including 100 surveillance cameras, motion detectors and access-control doors. In Sacramento, where a patron killed two librarians in April, their colleagues want panic buttons behind the desks. In Miami, libraries are hiring off-duty police officers and filling in windows to discourage break-ins.
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