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Richard Kronick

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NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
These five Californians made key contributions to President Clinton's health reform plan. Alain Enthoven * Age: 63 * Occupation: Marriner S. Eccles professor of public and private management, Stanford Business School. Has held positions as an economist with the Rand Corp. and as an assistant secretary of defense. Helped England and the Netherlands reform their health care systems.
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NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
These five Californians made key contributions to President Clinton's health reform plan. Alain Enthoven * Age: 63 * Occupation: Marriner S. Eccles professor of public and private management, Stanford Business School. Has held positions as an economist with the Rand Corp. and as an assistant secretary of defense. Helped England and the Netherlands reform their health care systems.
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HEALTH
August 21, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Here's some bad news for the confirmed bachelors and runaway brides of the world: They don't live as long as married people, especially if they never get married, according to new research. Many studies have found that unmarried adults tend to die earlier than those who are married, but most did not differentiate between those who were separated or divorced and those who never got hitched. In the new study, Robert Kaplan of UCLA and Richard Kronick of U.C.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's beleaguered health reform plan took another hit Wednesday, this time from the Stanford University health economist credited as an intellectual father of health purchasing alliances--a centerpiece of the President's proposal. In a speech in New York, Prof. Alain C. Enthoven said that Clinton's plan is unworkable and should be rewritten.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1989
Vigorous new efforts to make the health-care system universal are under way at the national level and in California as well. The concern and effort come at an appropriate time. President-elect George Bush has a commitment to filling the gaps in the existing system. And the American people, in poll after poll, have shown their conviction that basic health care is a right of every citizen. At the moment there is agreement only on the problem's dimensions.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Beyond even jobs and the economy, the gut-wrenching question for most people is: Can the Clinton Administration bring order to the chaos in the nation's health care system? That question took on heightened meaning Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that an employee's health coverage can be cut abruptly when he or she contracts a chronic disease.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
Los Angeles resident Ruta Miller, 44, prides herself on keeping fit. "I'm super-healthy," she told me. "I exercise all the time. I eat well. I haven't even had a cold in I don't know how long." So she was a bit startled to receive a notice from Blue Shield of California saying that her monthly insurance premium would rise by almost 54% on July 1. Miller's situation illustrates the danger people face as politicians and industry lobbyists continue wrangling over reform of the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the babble surrounding health care, keep two clear objectives in mind: One aim is to finance access to decent medical care for all Americans, and the other is to control expenses and get good value in U.S. health care. There are grounds for hope that both goals will be fulfilled in this decade, but only if we stop kidding ourselves. Today's system contains a gigantic subsidy for the American middle class--we have met the enemy and some of him is us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2004 | Jordan Rau and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
The voters' rejection of a sweeping proposed health insurance mandate on employers made many experts conclude Wednesday that piecemeal improvements may well be the only politically palatable way to address California's large number of uninsured people and skyrocketing costs. California's uninsured rate is one of the highest in the country, but the defeat of Proposition 72 was the third time in a dozen years that the state's voters rejected a chance to fix a system that everyone agrees, as Gov.
OPINION
November 19, 1989 | Michael D. Reagan, Michael D. Reagan teaches public policy at UC Riverside
The time for expanded U.S. health insurance has come--and gone--more than once in this country's recent history. Yet the last decade of this century may at last see all Americans obtaining the kind of universal coverage that citizens of other countries have enjoyed for many years. Support for the idea of universal care goes back many years. Even the American Medical Assn., which torpedoed President Harry S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2004 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
In the year since Gov. Gray Davis was recalled from office, some of his final legacies -- including the higher car tax and driver's licenses for illegal immigrants -- have been excised from California law as completely as Davis was removed. Now, one of the Democratic governor's last and most significant projects, a 2003 law that requires businesses with 50 or more employees to provide workers with health insurance, is embroiled in a fight for its life as Proposition 72 on the November ballot.
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