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Richard Kughn

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BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For countless middle-aged American men, a bit of the essence of Christmas can be traced to a nondescript industrial park just outside this working-class city a short drive from Detroit. It is where Lionel electric trains come from. Building toward the Christmas season, hundreds of workers at Lionel Train Co. perched on stools as a little assembly line rolled slowly past, transporting parts of toy locomotives, freight cars and other "rolling stock" carrying the proud Lionel name.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For countless middle-aged American men, a bit of the essence of Christmas can be traced to a nondescript industrial park just outside this working-class city a short drive from Detroit. It is where Lionel electric trains come from. Building toward the Christmas season, hundreds of workers at Lionel Train Co. perched on stools as a little assembly line rolled slowly past, transporting parts of toy locomotives, freight cars and other "rolling stock" carrying the proud Lionel name.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Model train maker Lionel will close its manufacturing operations in Macomb County, Mich., by the end of August, because of increased costs and competition. About 325 workers will be laid off initially, but some will be offered new positions. The company's Michigan operation employs about 550 people who are represented by Local 417 of the United Auto Workers. Founded in 1900, Lionel had reported revenue of more than $33 million by 1953.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1986
Richard P. Kughn reached an agreement to purchase the division, which manufacturers model trains, from Kenner Parker. Kughn, of Detroit, and Kenner Parker, based in Beverly, Mass., declined to reveal terms of the transaction. Lionel trains are manufactured by about 300 workers at a factory in Mount Clemens, Mich., 20 miles north of Detroit.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1995 | Times staff and wire services
* Toys: Former Paramount Communications Chief Executive Martin Davis is getting his fledging investment firm on track. He's buying Lionel Trains, the world's largest maker of model trains, with singer Neil Young as his partner. Davis' Wellspring Associates did not disclose the purchase price. The seller is Detroit businessman Richard Kughn, who bought the company from General Mills Inc. in 1985.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national pastime's lockout nearly threw the baseball card business a curve, but Upper Deck, the hottest commodity in that booming market, already was safe at home. Baseball card sales are typically slowest just before spring training opens. With the delay caused by the player lockout, some expected the retail card market to suffer a prolonged sag.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
No longer just a juvenile pastime, baseball-card collecting has become big business. Rare cards fetch tens of thousands of dollars at auction, well-known stars hawk their signatures at conventions and over cable shopping channels and hobbyist publications track the latest sale prices and trends for legions of subscribers.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
They go around and around, through miniature tunnels and past plastic forests, before pulling into tiny train stations where porters and passengers are perpetually frozen in anticipation. This is the world of model trains, one in which an increasing number of mostly male Americans, from schoolboys to affluent middle-aged adults, are immersing themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
The invitation to tonight's premiere of the HBO Pictures film "A Private Matter" at the Directors Guild Theater lays it out . . . semi-ominously, it would seem: In 1962 an abortion divided the country. History is about to repeat itself. Exactly what part of history--or what abortion--may miraculously be about to be repeated is left to the invitee's imagination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997 | ELIZABETH WEISE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The whine of jigsaws and the smell of glue guns hits even before the eyes can adjust to the cool interior of the cavernous building. Looking like a cross between Santa's elves and the backstage crew at a Grateful Dead concert, more than a dozen workers huddle over pieces of rocky landscape, graceful bridges and a towering forest of redwood trees. Others wield soldering irons and circuit boards, configuring the electronics that make the trains run on time. The air of concentration is intense.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Major League lockout nearly threw the baseball card business a curve, but Upper Deck, the hottest commodity in that booming market, was already safe at home. Baseball card sales are typically slowest just before spring training opens. But with the delay caused by the teams' lockout of players, some expected the retail card market to suffer a prolonged sag.
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