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Richard L Armitage

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NEWS
April 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Tuesday he will nominate Richard L. Armitage, the assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, to be the next secretary of the Army. The 43-year-old Armitage was picked for the Army's top civilian post by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney in late March after originally accepting a post at the State Department. Assuming Senate confirmation, Armitage will replace John O. Marsh, who has held the position since the first day of the Ronald Reagan Administration.
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NATIONAL
April 16, 2009 | Associated Press
A former No. 2 State Department official in the Bush administration says he hopes he would have had the courage to resign if he had known the CIA was subjecting terrorism suspects to waterboarding, an interrogation technique that simulates drowning. Richard L. Armitage, the former deputy secretary of State, told Al Jazeera English television in an interview airing Wednesday that waterboarding is torture.
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NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Richard L. Armitage, a top Defense Department official throughout the Ronald Reagan Administration and tapped by President Bush as the next secretary of the Army, has decided to leave government service, the Pentagon said Thursday. Armitage, currently the assistant defense secretary for international security affairs, "has asked that the President withdraw his name from consideration for Army secretary," said Peter Williams, the Pentagon's chief spokesman, who added: "Mr. Armitage also has asked to be relieved of his (current)
WORLD
September 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said the U.S. threatened to bomb his country back to the Stone Age if he did not assist the administration's war on terrorism. The threat was delivered after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, by Richard L. Armitage, then deputy secretary of State, to Musharraf's intelligence director, the Pakistani leader told CBS' "60 Minutes" for Sunday's broadcast. Musharraf said the intelligence chief quoted Armitage as saying, "Be prepared to be bombed.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The nominations of Richard L. Armitage as deputy secretary of State and Marc Grossman as undersecretary of State for political affairs were confirmed by the Senate by voice vote. Armitage, who during the campaign advised President Bush on foreign affairs and defense, has long been a close friend of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times wire services
Richard L. Armitage, a top Defense Department official throughout the Reagan Administration and tapped by President Bush as the next secretary of the Army, has decided to leave government service, the Pentagon said today. Armitage, assistant defense secretary for international security affairs, wrote in his letter of resignation that he could "no longer accommodate the needs of my ever-growing family with the time and travel demands of public service." It was not known whether Armitage, who has eight children, had found a job in private industry.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
In a prepared statement, the Pentagon dismissed allegations of wrongdoing by Assistant Defense Secretary Richard L. Armitage. The Pentagon said that allegations against Armitage had surfaced more than a year ago in a series of phone calls to his office. But when the caller was tracked down, he never responded to a demand for substantiation. On Sunday, the Boston Globe quoted sources it did not name as saying billionaire H.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Richard L. Armitage confirmed Thursday that when he was the No. 2 State Department official, in 2003, he inadvertently disclosed the identity of CIA employee Valerie Plame in conversations with two reporters. The former deputy secretary of State, acknowledging that he was the source of a leak that triggered a federal investigation, said he never intended to reveal Plame's identity.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2009 | Associated Press
A former No. 2 State Department official in the Bush administration says he hopes he would have had the courage to resign if he had known the CIA was subjecting terrorism suspects to waterboarding, an interrogation technique that simulates drowning. Richard L. Armitage, the former deputy secretary of State, told Al Jazeera English television in an interview airing Wednesday that waterboarding is torture.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The Bush Administration has chosen its three civilian service secretaries--Assistant Secretary of Defense Richard L. Armitage for the Army, Undersecretary H. Lawrence Garrett III for the Navy and Donald B. Rice of the RAND Corp. for the Air Force--defense officials said Monday. The three are versed in the issues facing the services they are slated to run and have a low-key style that would not overshadow Defense Secretary Dick Cheney the way former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.'
NATIONAL
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Richard L. Armitage confirmed Thursday that when he was the No. 2 State Department official, in 2003, he inadvertently disclosed the identity of CIA employee Valerie Plame in conversations with two reporters. The former deputy secretary of State, acknowledging that he was the source of a leak that triggered a federal investigation, said he never intended to reveal Plame's identity.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The nominations of Richard L. Armitage as deputy secretary of State and Marc Grossman as undersecretary of State for political affairs were confirmed by the Senate by voice vote. Armitage, who during the campaign advised President Bush on foreign affairs and defense, has long been a close friend of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration announced Monday that it is replacing Richard L. Armitage, a George Bush Administration holdover who had been serving as coordinator of U.S. aid to the former Soviet Union, after he publicly predicted the ouster of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Richard L. Armitage, a top Defense Department official throughout the Ronald Reagan Administration and tapped by President Bush as the next secretary of the Army, has decided to leave government service, the Pentagon said Thursday. Armitage, currently the assistant defense secretary for international security affairs, "has asked that the President withdraw his name from consideration for Army secretary," said Peter Williams, the Pentagon's chief spokesman, who added: "Mr. Armitage also has asked to be relieved of his (current)
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Times wire services
Richard L. Armitage, a top Defense Department official throughout the Reagan Administration and tapped by President Bush as the next secretary of the Army, has decided to leave government service, the Pentagon said today. Armitage, assistant defense secretary for international security affairs, wrote in his letter of resignation that he could "no longer accommodate the needs of my ever-growing family with the time and travel demands of public service." It was not known whether Armitage, who has eight children, had found a job in private industry.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Tuesday he will nominate Richard L. Armitage, the assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, to be the next secretary of the Army. The 43-year-old Armitage was picked for the Army's top civilian post by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney in late March after originally accepting a post at the State Department. Assuming Senate confirmation, Armitage will replace John O. Marsh, who has held the position since the first day of the Ronald Reagan Administration.
WORLD
September 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said the U.S. threatened to bomb his country back to the Stone Age if he did not assist the administration's war on terrorism. The threat was delivered after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, by Richard L. Armitage, then deputy secretary of State, to Musharraf's intelligence director, the Pakistani leader told CBS' "60 Minutes" for Sunday's broadcast. Musharraf said the intelligence chief quoted Armitage as saying, "Be prepared to be bombed.
NEWS
March 13, 1985 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Philippine Communists could be strong enough to fight the pro-American government of President Ferdinand E. Marcos to a "strategic stalemate" within three or four years and could possible topple the regime by the end of the decade, a top Pentagon official said Tuesday. Describing the situation as urgent, Richard L.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The Bush Administration has chosen its three civilian service secretaries--Assistant Secretary of Defense Richard L. Armitage for the Army, Undersecretary H. Lawrence Garrett III for the Navy and Donald B. Rice of the RAND Corp. for the Air Force--defense officials said Monday. The three are versed in the issues facing the services they are slated to run and have a low-key style that would not overshadow Defense Secretary Dick Cheney the way former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr.'
NEWS
January 13, 1987
In a prepared statement, the Pentagon dismissed allegations of wrongdoing by Assistant Defense Secretary Richard L. Armitage. The Pentagon said that allegations against Armitage had surfaced more than a year ago in a series of phone calls to his office. But when the caller was tracked down, he never responded to a demand for substantiation. On Sunday, the Boston Globe quoted sources it did not name as saying billionaire H.
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