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Richard L Bliss

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January 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Richard L. Bliss, an American technician charged with espionage, will not have to go back to Russia, a U.S. official said in Washington. Bliss was arrested Nov. 25 in the southern city of Rostov-on-Don while installing a cellular telephone system. Presumably, Russian officials knew that he could not be compelled to return when they allowed him to go home for the Christmas holidays.
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NEWS
January 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Richard L. Bliss, an American technician charged with espionage, will not have to go back to Russia, a U.S. official said in Washington. Bliss was arrested Nov. 25 in the southern city of Rostov-on-Don while installing a cellular telephone system. Presumably, Russian officials knew that he could not be compelled to return when they allowed him to go home for the Christmas holidays.
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NEWS
December 24, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard L. Bliss, a telecommunications technician from San Diego who was charged with espionage for using satellite equipment in his work, was freed Tuesday from Russian custody in the southern city of Rostov-on-Don to return home for the holidays. The release of Bliss, 29, was hailed by his employer, Qualcomm Inc. of San Diego, as a humanitarian gesture allowing him to join his family in time for Christmas.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | Associated Press
Hundreds of co-workers Monday welcomed home accused spy Richard Bliss at the headquarters of Qualcomm Inc., the company that sent him to Russia to install a cellular phone system. Bliss, 29, was allowed to come home for the holidays, although he still officially faces charges of espionage in Russia.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | Associated Press
Hundreds of co-workers Monday welcomed home accused spy Richard Bliss at the headquarters of Qualcomm Inc., the company that sent him to Russia to install a cellular phone system. Bliss, 29, was allowed to come home for the holidays, although he still officially faces charges of espionage in Russia.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | Associated Press
Bowing to U.S. pressure, Russia's intelligence agency on Saturday released an American accused of spying but said he still faces espionage charges and must remain in Russia. The Federal Security Service said Richard L. Bliss, 29, had been released in Rostov-on-Don in exchange for a promise not to leave the southern city where he was arrested Nov. 25 after conducting land surveys. Bliss was in good condition, U.S. diplomats in Moscow said.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia formally filed espionage charges Friday against Richard L. Bliss, an American engineer, accusing him of illegally importing satellite equipment and transmitting secret information to San Diego with it. Bliss, an employee for San Diego-based Qualcomm Inc. who was arrested last month, has admitted that he brought his equipment illegally into Russia, but he denies espionage charges, the Federal Security Service told the semiofficial Itar-Tass news agency.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian security agents have arrested an American employee of San Diego-based Qualcomm Inc. in the southern city of Rostov-on-Don, accusing him of spying with unregistered satellite communications equipment, officials disclosed Monday. The U.S. Embassy here dispatched a consular officer to investigate the detention since last Tuesday of Richard L. Bliss and the interrogation of another American employee of the same company who has been released.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian judge ended the first spy trial of the post-Cold War era Wednesday by throwing the book at American businessman Edmond D. Pope, convicting him of espionage and sentencing him to the maximum prison term of 20 years. Pope, a 54-year-old retired naval intelligence officer who ran a marine technology firm, is the first American convicted of espionage in Russia since U2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers was shot down over the Soviet Union in 1960.
NEWS
December 24, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard L. Bliss, a telecommunications technician from San Diego who was charged with espionage for using satellite equipment in his work, was freed Tuesday from Russian custody in the southern city of Rostov-on-Don to return home for the holidays. The release of Bliss, 29, was hailed by his employer, Qualcomm Inc. of San Diego, as a humanitarian gesture allowing him to join his family in time for Christmas.
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