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Richard L Thornburgh

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NEWS
July 13, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Richard L. Thornburgh, President Reagan's choice to replace Edwin Meese III as attorney general, said Tuesday that he would "follow the evidence wherever it may lead" in pursuing any recommendations stemming from an independent counsel's 14-month investigation of Meese. However, Thornburgh, whose nomination was announced by Reagan at the White House, said that he had no knowledge of the evidence compiled during the inquiry and refused to predict whether it would warrant subsequent action.
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NEWS
June 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Austin, Tex., ordered former U.S. Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh to help pay nearly $300,000 in campaign debts from his failed 1991 U.S. Senate race in Pennsylvania. Thornburgh, his campaign committee and campaign treasurer Raymond Dimuzio were sued for the debts by Texas political consultant Karl Rove. U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks ruled that Thornburgh and his committee were both responsible for the debt. Sparks excused Dimuzio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988
If former Pennsylvania Gov. Richard L. Thornburgh, chosen by Reagan as the next attorney general, is as the President says, "a prosecutor's prosecutor," does that mean that Meese will soon be under indictment? JOHN CRONQUIST Fullerton
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former U.S. official completing a one-year assignment at the United Nations says the world body is hobbled by antiquated management, staff "deadwood" protected by patronage and "almost surreal" budget practices, according to a published report. Richard L. Thornburgh, a former U.S. attorney general, set out the findings in a report delivered Friday to U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the Washington Post said.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former U.S. official completing a one-year assignment at the United Nations says the world body is hobbled by antiquated management, staff "deadwood" protected by patronage and "almost surreal" budget practices, according to a published report. Richard L. Thornburgh, a former U.S. attorney general, set out the findings in a report delivered Friday to U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the Washington Post said.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | Associated Press
The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a confirmation hearing for Atty. Gen.-designate Richard L. Thornburgh on Aug. 5 and vote the week of Aug. 8. The schedule, announced by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), the committee chairman, would give the full Senate the opportunity to vote on confirming Thornburgh before adjourning for the summer. Thornburgh, who would replace Edwin Meese III, is expected to win easy confirmation.
NEWS
August 15, 1988
Atty. Gen. Richard L. Thornburgh expressed little enthusiasm for Edwin Meese III's last-minute order to have independent counsels investigate wrongdoing in Congress, and he said that he saw only "a very limited role" for such special prosecutors. Meese's final act last week as attorney general was to sign an order for special prosecutors to investigate criminal allegations against members of Congress.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's nomination of Richard L. Thornburgh to succeed Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III won unanimous approval Wednesday from the Senate Judiciary Committee and appeared headed for prompt confirmation by the full Senate. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), acting committee chairman, urged Senate Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.) to move the nomination quickly to the Senate floor so that Thornburgh could be approved before the chamber adjourns, possibly today, until Sept. 7.
NEWS
July 12, 1988 | ART PINE and MARK LAWRENCE, Times Staff Writers
The man President Reagan has chosen to replace Edwin Meese III as attorney general appears to have everything needed to win quick approval from the Senate and to restore the Justice Department's now-clouded image, acquaintances and former colleagues said Monday. Former Pennsylvania Gov. Richard L. Thornburgh, 55, is a Republican moderate who has spent almost two decades as a lawyer and nationally known politician and has emerged scandal-free--and with high marks from both parties. A former U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A criminal investigation by the Justice Department has concluded that the chief spokesman for the attorney general and a former FBI official played roles in confirming a politically damaging CBS report about Rep. William H. Gray III of Pennsylvania, one of the top Democratic leaders in the House. The investigation failed to establish the original source of the information, but said the individual probably was outside the Justice Department, sources close to the investigation said Thursday.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | EDITH STANLEY and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the height of a federal investigation into illegal loans to Iraq by Italy's largest bank, the Italian ambassador to the United States pressed then-Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh during a White House luncheon not to indict the bank, according to a document disclosed in federal court Wednesday.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Two Republican former attorneys general denied Saturday that the Bush and Reagan administrations used an ideological "litmus test" to select Supreme Court justices--and one assailed Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton for pledging to appoint only jurists who support abortion rights. The remarks by the two former high officials--Dick Thornburgh and Edwin Meese III--came during a rare and free-wheeling panel meeting of attorneys general from the last six presidential administrations.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | From the Baltimore Sun
President Bush is pushing former Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh for the top administrative job on the U.N. staff, U.S. officials said Saturday. An American is expected to be named to the new post of undersecretary for administration and management and to play a crucial role in streamlining the bureaucracy of the world body. Bush, who has been trying to find a new spot in government for Thornburgh since his loss in the U.S.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | Democrat Harris Wofford's victory over former Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh in last week's Pennsylvania senatorial race has "sent a message"--to President Bush and to political leaders in both parties--about the mood of the electorate. Here is a sampling of editorial opinion from newspapers around the country about the voters' concerns on the economy and other key issues:
WOFFORD MANDATE: MIDDLE CLASS DEMANDS RECOGNITION: If Wofford's victory represents a wake-up call for America, as we think it does, it is one directed at incumbents who have spent too long feeding at the public trough and have lost touch with the day-to-day struggle most Americans face raising a family and paying the bills.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Democrat Harris Wofford's effective use of health insurance reform as a campaign issue has emboldened California lawmakers and activists striving to make medical care available to every resident of the state. Although opinion polls have been showing for some time that voters want broader access to health care, along with cost controls on doctors and hospitals, the legislative and executive branches of state government have yet to agree on any significant plan for change.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Returns from Tuesday's off-year election provided clear evidence that the nation's yearlong siege of economic distress has profoundly transformed the political landscape, to the potential advantage of the Democratic Party and its prospects for regaining the White House in 1992.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Atty. Gen. Richard L. Thornburgh voiced serious reservations Tuesday about ex-Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III's order subjecting Congress to independent counsel investigations and praised Justice Department units now conducting such inquiries.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted unanimously Thursday to confirm Richard L. Thornburgh as attorney general in a move that members said would restore stability and integrity to the Justice Department following the departure of Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III. The 85-0 vote capped an unprecedentedly short, one-month confirmation process that stood in sharp contrast to the one-year inquiry the Senate conducted of Meese before approving his nomination in January, 1985.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a stinging rebuke to President Bush, underdog Democratic Sen. Harris Wofford Tuesday scored a dramatic upset against Republican challenger Dick Thornburgh in Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate special election by exploiting voter discontent with Washington in general and White House domestic policies in particular. With 93% of precincts reporting, Wofford had 1,717,903 or 56%, to Thornburgh's 1,372,187 or 44%.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A special U.S. Senate election in Pennsylvania and a term-limit referendum in Washington state today will test voter frustration with President Bush's economic policies and resentment of the Democratic-dominated Congress--forces expected to help shape the 1992 presidential campaign. The contest in Pennsylvania pits Democrat Harris Wofford against Republican Dick Thornburgh. Wofford is fighting to hold on to the seat to which he was appointed last May after the death of Republican Sen.
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