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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Steve Hochman
As the screenwriter of "The Fisher King" and adaptations of "The Horse Whisperer" and "Beloved," Richard LaGravenese has given great material to such directing talents as Terry Gilliam, Robert Redford and Jonathan Demme. But with "Living Out Loud," starring Holly Hunter and Danny DeVito, New York-based LaGravenese, 39, saved the script for his own directorial debut. TO THINE OWN SELF: "I'm not really aware of what the marketplace is looking for because I don't live in L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
In my recent review of the HBO film "Behind the Candelabra," I was so busy deconstructing the big flap over casting as an ironic example of image trumping reality that I proceeded to perpetuate the same crime. No film is created by a director and his or her cast; as the Writer's Guild constantly reminds us (and for reasons that are now quite clear): "Somebody wrote that. " In this case, that somebody was acclaimed screenwriter Richard LaGravenese, who adapted the film from a book by Alex Thoralefson and Scott Thorson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's a challenge: Translate Robert James Waller's best-selling treaclefest, "The Bridges of Madison County," into a screen drama. No problem, you say? Oh, we forgot: While you're at it, make it good . Against all odds, that is precisely what screenwriter Richard LaGravenese has done.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Maybe there really are supernatural forces at work in this world. How else to explain "Beautiful Creatures"? The movie is an intriguing, intelligent enigma - three words not typically associated with teen romances. A couple of unknown heartthrobs provide the film's X-factor, while its angst lies in true love's struggle against otherworldly powers, Civil War flashbacks, literary conceits and high school friction. Besides, any film that credibly references poet Charles Bukowski has my attention.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Clint Eastwood (as director as well as co-star), Meryl Streep (pictured) and Richard LaGravenese pooled their resources and turned the novel of the same name into a surprisingly moving 1995 feature. Few books have been shrugged off so casually as Robert James Waller's slender story, but Eastwood and his colleagues have transformed the material into a highly satisfying film, despite some awkwardness in its framing story (HBO, Sunday at 2:30 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Don't treat me like I'm stupid, Bob," says Judith Nelson in the opening moments of "Living Out Loud," her husband lying to her and on the way to leaving after 16 years of marriage. But Bob's not the only one who treats Judith badly--she also does it to herself. Written and directed by Richard LaGravenese, "Living Out Loud" is a film of eccentric charm, a warm and sympathetic character comedy about romance, vulnerability and the odd turns the search for one's self can take.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
In my recent review of the HBO film "Behind the Candelabra," I was so busy deconstructing the big flap over casting as an ironic example of image trumping reality that I proceeded to perpetuate the same crime. No film is created by a director and his or her cast; as the Writer's Guild constantly reminds us (and for reasons that are now quite clear): "Somebody wrote that. " In this case, that somebody was acclaimed screenwriter Richard LaGravenese, who adapted the film from a book by Alex Thoralefson and Scott Thorson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Maybe there really are supernatural forces at work in this world. How else to explain "Beautiful Creatures"? The movie is an intriguing, intelligent enigma - three words not typically associated with teen romances. A couple of unknown heartthrobs provide the film's X-factor, while its angst lies in true love's struggle against otherworldly powers, Civil War flashbacks, literary conceits and high school friction. Besides, any film that credibly references poet Charles Bukowski has my attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Woodrow Wilson High School in Long Beach is one of the school district's jewels. Situated near million-dollar homes, it's considered a "learning academy" where uniformed students study classics and others vie to make its waiting list. But in the new Hilary Swank film "Freedom Writers," that same school is portrayed as a beaten-down inner-city nightmare, run by bitter burned-out teachers and populated with well-armed students.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1992
UCLA Extension offers two new screenwriting programs, "Writing With a Partner," a one-day workshop to be held Oct. 10, and "Screenwriters and Screenwriting," consisting of six evenings with top Hollywood writers, which begins Wednesday. The one-day workshop will be held in Room 4200 Math Sciences, UCLA, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The in-person screenwriters' series will take place in Room 147 Dodd Hall, UCLA, from 7 to 10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Don't treat me like I'm stupid, Bob," says Judith Nelson in the opening moments of "Living Out Loud," her husband lying to her and on the way to leaving after 16 years of marriage. But Bob's not the only one who treats Judith badly--she also does it to herself. Written and directed by Richard LaGravenese, "Living Out Loud" is a film of eccentric charm, a warm and sympathetic character comedy about romance, vulnerability and the odd turns the search for one's self can take.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Steve Hochman
As the screenwriter of "The Fisher King" and adaptations of "The Horse Whisperer" and "Beloved," Richard LaGravenese has given great material to such directing talents as Terry Gilliam, Robert Redford and Jonathan Demme. But with "Living Out Loud," starring Holly Hunter and Danny DeVito, New York-based LaGravenese, 39, saved the script for his own directorial debut. TO THINE OWN SELF: "I'm not really aware of what the marketplace is looking for because I don't live in L.A.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Clint Eastwood (as director as well as co-star), Meryl Streep (pictured) and Richard LaGravenese pooled their resources and turned the novel of the same name into a surprisingly moving 1995 feature. Few books have been shrugged off so casually as Robert James Waller's slender story, but Eastwood and his colleagues have transformed the material into a highly satisfying film, despite some awkwardness in its framing story (HBO, Sunday at 2:30 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's a challenge: Translate Robert James Waller's best-selling treaclefest, "The Bridges of Madison County," into a screen drama. No problem, you say? Oh, we forgot: While you're at it, make it good . Against all odds, that is precisely what screenwriter Richard LaGravenese has done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001
Re "Joyful Writers Express Relief Over New Pact," May 5: Screenwriter Deborah Amelon states that "[Writers Guild of America President] John Wells is going to be a hero to writers for many years to come." Huh? What major concessions did the writers truly receive? Certainly not the money (Wells' annual salary alone is close to the $41 million of the writers' three-year deal). And respect? Access to the set? Who's going to decide that? Case in point: "Erin Brockovich." Who would be invited, [screenwriters]
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