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Richard Lawson

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
When Richard Lawson talks, people listen. When he enters a room, people take notice. When he smiles, women swoon. Richard Lawson is one of those people who lights up any space he's in. Currently, he's lighting up the stage at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, playing trumpeter Levee in August Wilson's "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" (through Aug. 29). Did the Theatre Center have to do a lot of sweet-talking to woo the "Dynasty" star back to the stage?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989
The cast for the American premiere of Tom Stoppard's "Hapgood" has been set. Roger Rees, who will re-create the role he originated in the London production, stars with Simon Jones, Judy Davis, Richard Lawson and James Lancaster. The Ahmanson production will open April 12 at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood. Low-priced previews begin April 1. Information: (213) 410-1062.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989
The cast for the American premiere of Tom Stoppard's "Hapgood" has been set. Roger Rees, who will re-create the role he originated in the London production, stars with Simon Jones, Judy Davis, Richard Lawson and James Lancaster. The Ahmanson production will open April 12 at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood. Low-priced previews begin April 1. Information: (213) 410-1062.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"For Colored Girls" is not easy. Its poetry is hot and searing, its story an unbroken current of rage and pain and sex and abuse and solidarity and self and empowerment. Nine women ? in screams, whispers and weeping ? demand that you listen, that you don't look away, that you deal with the discomfort as they did. It is a film destined to polarize. Many will hate it. Hopefully more will love it, or at least allow room for it, for its raw brutality, its extremes, its difficult truths.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Ron Milner's lively and penetrating "Checkmates," a roundelay for two black married couples, has returned to the Westwood Playhouse with three new members in its cross-generational quartet. Marla Gibbs, Richard Lawson and Vanessa Williams have joined the original production's Paul Winfield. It's an explosively funny combination, which is fine when the play is supposed to be explosively funny, but less fine when Milner aims for quieter effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Woe to Edgar Allan Poe. In life, the writer was ill-served by fortune: orphaned as a toddler, an indebted college dropout, Poe moved often, usually to dodge creditors. His beloved wife (and, um, first cousin) died in the Bronx at age 24; two years later Poe himself was dead. The circumstances of his death remain mysterious -- the 40-year-old left Richmond, Va., en route to Philadelphia and turned up five days later at a pub in Baltimore, where he was delirious, wearing someone else's clothes and was at the end of a deathly bender or something else that drove him into the arms of the grim reaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993
Our state superintendent of public instruction earns $102,000. Our state legislators take home $52,500. Gov. Pete Wilson was making $120,000 but has voluntarily taken a 5% cut because of the economic crisis in California. But the Ventura County Board of Education just voted 4 to 1 to give our newly appointed county superintendent of schools the same $112,466 annual salary as his predecessor, plus $18,870 a year in benefits (a total of $131,336). Unfortunately, only one board member (Wendy Larner)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1989 | RAY LOYND
USA Network tonight debuts its World Premiere Movies with "The Forgotten"(9-11 p.m.), a story of six American MIAs who are released from the hell of Vietnam into the hell of U.S. military and political corruption. The first of 24 original movies that the cable channel has commissioned, the production is turgid and airless, a murky filament in USA Network's self-described "new" look. The cast features strong performances from Keith Carradine and Steve Railsback as the key MIA guys suddenly freed and whisked off to a U.S Army base in Germany after 17 years as Vietnam POWs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
Theater "Dharma and Greg's" Jenna Elfman (above, with "Lateline's" Miguel Ferrer) headlines in Milton Katselas' "Visions and Lovers: Variations on a Theme," premiering today at the Skylight Theatre. The evening of two one-acts also features Suzzanne Douglas ("The Parent 'Hood") and Richard Lawson. * "Albee's People," selections from Edward Albee's works exploring the heights and depths of the human psyche, features two separate bills in repertory at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Ron Milner's lively and penetrating "Checkmates," a roundelay for two black married couples, has returned to the Westwood Playhouse with three new members in its cross-generational quartet. Marla Gibbs, Richard Lawson and Vanessa Williams have joined the original production's Paul Winfield. It's an explosively funny combination, which is fine when the play is supposed to be explosively funny, but less fine when Milner aims for quieter effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
When Richard Lawson talks, people listen. When he enters a room, people take notice. When he smiles, women swoon. Richard Lawson is one of those people who lights up any space he's in. Currently, he's lighting up the stage at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, playing trumpeter Levee in August Wilson's "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" (through Aug. 29). Did the Theatre Center have to do a lot of sweet-talking to woo the "Dynasty" star back to the stage?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
"Kid, you want to be a hero, and there just ain't no heroes. No villains, either. It's a strange war." And an even stranger show. For this isn't a grizzled combat veteran instructing a young soldier to stay cool, it's an experienced high school teacher counseling an ardent newcomer about the realities of the profession. Welcome to "The Faculty," an enormously intriguing, disntinctly unsettling half-hour pilot that Jay Tarses wrote and directed for ABC more than a year ago.
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