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Richard Leacock

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Richard Leacock is a towering figure in the world of non-fiction filmmaking, best known for his involvement in seminal documentary films such as "Primary" and "Monterey Pop" and the movement of observational style known as direct cinema or cinéma vérité. In "Ricky on Leacock" Leacock's former student Jane Weiner mixes together interviews, archival material and casual footage of Leacock that crosses decades to create a film that is as much a portrait of aging as it is of the man himself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Richard Leacock is a towering figure in the world of non-fiction filmmaking, best known for his involvement in seminal documentary films such as "Primary" and "Monterey Pop" and the movement of observational style known as direct cinema or cinéma vérité. In "Ricky on Leacock" Leacock's former student Jane Weiner mixes together interviews, archival material and casual footage of Leacock that crosses decades to create a film that is as much a portrait of aging as it is of the man himself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1987 | CHRISTINE ZIAYA
Documentary film maker Richard Leacock has been involved with film since he was 13--as a cameraman, editor, writer, producer, director and educator. "I love finding out how people tick," he says. This curiosity has led, at 66, to a body of work that includes at least 150 documentaries and a reputation as a technical and stylistic innovator. Leacock has been singled out for recognition today by the 800-member International Documentary Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "A Weekend With Richard Leacock," Friday through Sunday at the Directors Guild, 7920 Sunset Blvd., pays tribute to a giant of the cinema who would undoubtedly be more famous had he not chosen to spend his life working in the documentary form. Leacock will be present throughout the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "A Weekend With Richard Leacock," Friday through Sunday at the Directors Guild, 7920 Sunset Blvd., pays tribute to a giant of the cinema who would undoubtedly be more famous had he not chosen to spend his life working in the documentary form. Leacock will be present throughout the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1998 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Anyone who sees "Grey Gardens" isn't likely to forget it. The 1976 documentary, directed by Albert and David Maysles, takes us into the strange world of aging debutante Little Edie Beale, who lives with her mother, Big Edie, in a squalid 28-room mansion, the Grey Gardens of the title, in East Hampton, N.Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1995
The second International Documentary Congress will be held Oct. 25-28 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Scheduled participants include directors Michael Apted, Richard Leacock, Allie Light and Marina Goldovaskaya.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
When Billy Ray Cyrus broke into the national consciousness more than a decade ago with a catchy crossover ditty titled "Achy Breaky Heart," few predicted a long shelf life for his talents. Most pop-culture pundits figured he'd go the way of other one-hit wonders, taking his wild and woolly mullet and the proceeds from his record and disappear quietly from the scene. But Billy didn't go anywhere. He continues to record and tour, and yet the music stuff is almost a sideline these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert and Anne Drew could not have known what a prescient title they had chosen for their 90-minute documentary for PBS on India's family of rulers since independence in 1947. "Life and Death of a Dynasty" (Sunday at 10 p.m., Channel 28) tracks the legacy of the first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, on to his daughter, Indira Gandhi, and finally to her son, Rajiv Gandhi.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
In her wryly fine and fictional "Working Girls" (at the Westside Pavilion Cinemas), film maker Lizzie Borden takes us inside a bustling, expensive Manhattan bordello and lets us watch the 18-hour day of one of its best and brightest "girls," the thoughtful, articulate Molly (Louise Smith), a Yale graduate with degrees in both art history and English lit. What we see in the course of that very long day is funny, insightful, banal, sad, tedious, informational, infuriating--everything but erotic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1987 | CHRISTINE ZIAYA
Documentary film maker Richard Leacock has been involved with film since he was 13--as a cameraman, editor, writer, producer, director and educator. "I love finding out how people tick," he says. This curiosity has led, at 66, to a body of work that includes at least 150 documentaries and a reputation as a technical and stylistic innovator. Leacock has been singled out for recognition today by the 800-member International Documentary Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the information highway leaves you feeling the world is shrinking at an alarming rate, go see "Umm Kulthum: A Voice Like Egypt." A documentary directed by Michal Goldman that plays through Thursday at the Grand Theater, this film will remind you of how very big and mysterious the world remains. Umm Kulthum was a peasant girl born at the turn of the century whose musical gifts carried her to the top of the Arabic world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pascal Aubier's irresistible "Son of Gascogne" puts a smile on your face and keeps it there. This French charmer involves young love, an intricate comedy plot and an homage to vintage New Wave stars and directors. It's Aubier's first feature in 20 years, but you'd never know the director of "Valparaiso, Valparaiso" and "The Song of Farewell," two well-received films of the '70s, had ever been away.
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