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Richard Leakey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1997
Re "Richard Leakey to Discuss Human Rights," Feb. 11. Thanks to The Times for notice of Richard Leakey's participation in Soka University's Human Rights Lecture Series on Feb. 13. But where was the follow-up of the discussion, which focused on the need for democratic reform in Africa ("Africa's Perilous Sport: The Hunt for Democracy")? When the world's most famous living paleoanthropologist and former director of Kenya's Wildlife Service travels halfway around the globe to share his views, don't The Times' readers deserve to know them?
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TRAVEL
November 24, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here come the holidays, and with them the season's usual bounty from the publishing industry: coffee-table books. Here are four new travel-related volumes that might make worthy gifts. "Planet Earth" is a book that strikes you between the eyes. Its lures are many, from the richness of the colors in these pictures taken from space to the thrill of spotting a familiar continental profile.
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BOOKS
November 29, 1992 | Stephen Jay Gould, Gould teaches geology, biology and the history of science at Harvard. His new book, "Eight Little Piggies," will be published in January.
My friend Richard Leakey once appeared in a Rolex-watch ad (not a bad freebie in undoubted recompense). The ad's text summarized the essence of Leakey's work in a fine and incisive epitome: "Human evolution was commonly considered an unbroken cord; his studies reveal more complex lines of descent."
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lunchtime in Nairobi. At the airport, boxes packed for safari carry guns and cameras. As remote as the safari-going culture seems from the politics of everyday life in Africa, it is a source of income and a source of stories. It is also, increasingly, a way to protect Africa's vivid environment. Richard Leakey has spent 40 years fighting to save Africa's wildlife from poachers and habitat destruction and has worn many hats along the way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kenyan wildlife conservationist Richard Leakey said Wednesday at UC Irvine that poaching of elephants has declined dramatically in Africa, but other problems continue to face the giant mammals. From a rate of more than 3,000 a year in the mid-1980s, poaching has declined to less than 50 a year today, Leakey said. Pressures from growing human populations, however, cloud the animals' future.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed conservationist Richard Leakey has boldly criticized the Kenyan government for corruption and social decay and joined the call for a new political opposition in his home country--a step that has provoked harsh reaction here, inflamed racial sensitivities and perhaps nudged this country closer to chaos.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1979, ecologist Norman Myers published "The Sinking Ark," in which he argued that deforestation was removing as much as 2% of the world's trees each year, wiping out enormous numbers of species on the planet and ultimately threatening human survival. Since then, a debate has raged among scientists over whether Myers' doomsday estimates are accurate or alarmist. The hand-wringing environmentalists are sure that Myers is right, and the growth-is-good folks are equally sure that he is wrong.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Three men have been charged with publicly beating renowned paleontologist Richard Leakey and two journalists last month. The three, believed to be members of President Daniel Arap Moi's ruling Kenya African National Union party, pleaded not guilty and were freed on about $200 bail each. The victims, members of a new opposition party seeking registration, were beaten Aug. 10 outside the courthouse in Nakuru, 90 miles northwest of Nairobi.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Renowned conservationist Richard Leakey has resigned from his post as head of the civil service and leader of a team designed to extricate Kenya from its myriad economic problems, the president's office said. Leakey, who has made enemies with his blunt approach and has had a difficult relationship with President Daniel Arap Moi, volunteered to step down, the office said. Leakey could not be reached for comment. Leakey was named by Moi to head the civil service in 1999.
NEWS
October 7, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Undermining the government's recent promise to implement certain political reforms before this year's general election, Kenyan authorities Monday refused to legalize a popular political party led by reformer Richard Leakey, the world-famous paleontologist. Claiming, among other things, that the Safina party's objectives are unlawful, Registrar-General Omondi Mbago called those intentions "incompatible with peace, welfare or good order in Kenya."
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of political shake-ups including the departure of civil service boss Richard Leakey is casting doubt on Kenya's economic prospects and leading analysts to question the government's commitment to reform. The renowned paleontologist, son of white colonial settlers, was head of a "dream team" recruited from the private sector to clean up Kenya's notoriously corrupt and inefficient civil service and prepare state-owned companies for privatization.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Renowned conservationist Richard Leakey has resigned from his post as head of the civil service and leader of a team designed to extricate Kenya from its myriad economic problems, the president's office said. Leakey, who has made enemies with his blunt approach and has had a difficult relationship with President Daniel Arap Moi, volunteered to step down, the office said. Leakey could not be reached for comment. Leakey was named by Moi to head the civil service in 1999.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man charged with rescuing Kenya's civil service from the depths of mismanagement and corruption has been praised as an industrious and efficient administrator--and slammed as an arrogant son of white colonialists. Richard Leakey, the famed paleontologist and conservationist who was recently appointed to head Kenya's public service sector, will need all those character traits in his new job. Supporters believe that Leakey has the medicine needed to cure the country's economic ills.
NEWS
October 7, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Undermining the government's recent promise to implement certain political reforms before this year's general election, Kenyan authorities Monday refused to legalize a popular political party led by reformer Richard Leakey, the world-famous paleontologist. Claiming, among other things, that the Safina party's objectives are unlawful, Registrar-General Omondi Mbago called those intentions "incompatible with peace, welfare or good order in Kenya."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1997
Re "Richard Leakey to Discuss Human Rights," Feb. 11. Thanks to The Times for notice of Richard Leakey's participation in Soka University's Human Rights Lecture Series on Feb. 13. But where was the follow-up of the discussion, which focused on the need for democratic reform in Africa ("Africa's Perilous Sport: The Hunt for Democracy")? When the world's most famous living paleoanthropologist and former director of Kenya's Wildlife Service travels halfway around the globe to share his views, don't The Times' readers deserve to know them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Famed paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey will discuss Kenya's political climate and human rights abuses Thursday as part of the Human Rights Lecture Series at Soka University of America. A longtime champion of human rights and wildlife conservation, Leakey will speak on "Africa's Perilous Sport: The Hunt for Democracy" beginning at 7 p.m. at the university, 26800 W. Mulholland Highway.
BOOKS
September 10, 1995 | Bettyann Kevles, Bettyann Kevles is writing "Naked to the Bone: A History of Imaging from X-Rays to MRI's." Her first book, "Watching the Wild Apes," won the New York Academy's 1977 prize for popular science
When Tolstoy advised his readers (in "Anna Karenina") that unhappy families are unhappy in different ways, he could have been talking about the Leakeys. The very model of familial dysfunction, the Leakeys are as interesting an exemplar of the heights and depths of the human condition as exists anywhere in fact or fiction. Science journalist Virginia Morell has managed to capture the personal drama without losing any of the magic of the Leakeys' contributions to paleontology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Famed paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey will discuss Kenya's political climate and human rights abuses Thursday as part of the Human Rights Lecture Series at Soka University of America. A longtime champion of human rights and wildlife conservation, Leakey will speak on "Africa's Perilous Sport: The Hunt for Democracy" beginning at 7 p.m. at the university, 26800 W. Mulholland Highway.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1979, ecologist Norman Myers published "The Sinking Ark," in which he argued that deforestation was removing as much as 2% of the world's trees each year, wiping out enormous numbers of species on the planet and ultimately threatening human survival. Since then, a debate has raged among scientists over whether Myers' doomsday estimates are accurate or alarmist. The hand-wringing environmentalists are sure that Myers is right, and the growth-is-good folks are equally sure that he is wrong.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Three men have been charged with publicly beating renowned paleontologist Richard Leakey and two journalists last month. The three, believed to be members of President Daniel Arap Moi's ruling Kenya African National Union party, pleaded not guilty and were freed on about $200 bail each. The victims, members of a new opposition party seeking registration, were beaten Aug. 10 outside the courthouse in Nakuru, 90 miles northwest of Nairobi.
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