Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Lee Mcnair
IN THE NEWS

Richard Lee Mcnair

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | James MacPherson, Associated Press
The first gunshot grazed Richard Kitzman's head, knocking him to the floor of the grain elevator where he worked. Curled in a fetal position, he glimpsed the man looming over him with a snub-nosed .38. As the man squeezed off four shots, two of which missed, Kitzman stared at the gun. "I saw more of the revolver than I saw of him," he said, standing recently in the spot where he was shot in the Farmers Union grain elevator office the night of Nov. 17, 1987.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | James MacPherson, Associated Press
The first gunshot grazed Richard Kitzman's head, knocking him to the floor of the grain elevator where he worked. Curled in a fetal position, he glimpsed the man looming over him with a snub-nosed .38. As the man squeezed off four shots, two of which missed, Kitzman stared at the gun. "I saw more of the revolver than I saw of him," he said, standing recently in the spot where he was shot in the Farmers Union grain elevator office the night of Nov. 17, 1987.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Richard Lee McNair's job in the prison factory was mending U.S. mailbags. Thousands of the leather pouches were routinely delivered to the shop at the federal maximum-security penitentiary here, and the middle-aged convict worked quietly each day, helping to stitch them back up. Once the bags were refurbished, they were stacked on pallets, hundreds in a pile. McNair watched for four months as forklifts scooped up the pallets and hauled them to a warehouse just outside the prison walls.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Richard Lee McNair's job in the prison factory was mending U.S. mailbags. Thousands of the leather pouches were routinely delivered to the shop at the federal maximum-security penitentiary here, and the middle-aged convict worked quietly each day, helping to stitch them back up. Once the bags were refurbished, they were stacked on pallets, hundreds in a pile. McNair watched for four months as forklifts scooped up the pallets and hauled them to a warehouse just outside the prison walls.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Richard Lee McNair, America's wiliest prison escapee, met his match after 18 months on the lam when he was outrun by a cop who had just graduated from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police training academy. Pulled over while allegedly driving a stolen van and carrying two fake IDs, McNair tried to make a footrace out of it. But his dash for freedom ended a quarter mile down a gravel road in Campbellton, New Brunswick, on Thursday morning.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|