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Richard Leibner

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Michele Willens, Michele Willens is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Michael Gartner vividly recalls when, in 1989, as president of NBC News, he sat down for a meeting with Alfred Geller, the agent renegotiating Connie Chung's contract. "Geller plopped down and put his feet on the table," Gartner says. "He had a few buttons of his shirt open with his rather large stomach sticking out. He proceeded to tell me he wanted $3 million a year for Connie, her own prime-time show, she got to pick the producer and . . . he wanted a quick answer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1994 | Michele Willens, Michele Willens is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Michael Gartner vividly recalls when, in 1989, as president of NBC News, he sat down for a meeting with Alfred Geller, the agent renegotiating Connie Chung's contract. "Geller plopped down and put his feet on the table," Gartner says. "He had a few buttons of his shirt open with his rather large stomach sticking out. He proceeded to tell me he wanted $3 million a year for Connie, her own prime-time show, she got to pick the producer and . . . he wanted a quick answer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
The agents who negotiated the deals, the broadcast executives who accepted them and the multimillion-dollar media stars themselves all knew the day of reckoning was coming. But when it happened last week with the brutal cuts that whacked through the fat and into the marrow of CBS News, none of them wanted to take the blame.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
The agents who negotiated the deals, the broadcast executives who accepted them and the multimillion-dollar media stars themselves all knew the day of reckoning was coming. But when it happened last week with the brutal cuts that whacked through the fat and into the marrow of CBS News, none of them wanted to take the blame.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
ABC News anchor Paula Zahn, who may soon be the new co-anchor of bottom-rated "CBS This Morning," bid goodby today to her colleagues on ABC's top-rated "Good Morning America." Her farewell, made as she finished the news segments she anchors in the program, apparently caught both ABC and CBS officials by surprise. CBS had no immediate comment. ABC News President Roone Arledge released a brief statement praising Zahn's contribution and said, "We wish her all the best in her new assignment."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
CBS News made it official today, announcing that former ABC anchorwoman Paula Zahn will succeed Kathleen Sullivan as co-anchor of "CBS This Morning" starting Monday. CBS' formal announcement came after two weeks of news reports that the move was pending. Sullivan indirectly confirmed the shift during her farewell to viewers Friday. Her CBS contract expires in November.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a further blending of entertainment and news, Hollywood's Creative Artists Agency said Wednesday that it is linking up with the nation's top company representing broadcast journalists to develop potential specials, talk shows, interactive programs, videos and other projects. The joint venture links the Beverly Hills-based CAA talent agency with N.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diane Sawyer, who had been pursued by CBS News, has decided not to exercise an option in her ABC contract that would have allowed her to leave the network, ABC News executives said Monday. Sources said Sawyer's pact with ABC extends for several more years, paying her an estimated $7 million annually. She will continue to co-anchor ABC's "PrimeTime Live" newsmagazine with Sam Donaldson and will contribute occasionally to ABC's "Turning Point" documentary series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an upbeat demeanor that matched her Disney World surroundings, but at times appearing near tears, Kathleen Sullivan bid viewers goodby Friday on her last day as co-anchor of "CBS This Morning." Notified only the day before that Friday would be her last day on the job, Sullivan said that she was proud of her work and noted, "Yeah, I'm the one who wore the sweaters in the Olympics. I'm a bit older, but I'm also a bit wiser."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Richard Threlkeld, a former CBS and ABC correspondent who covered the fall of Saigon and helped establish the CBS "Sunday Morning" show with weekly stories that showcased his prodigious energy and incisive writing, died Friday in a car crash on Long Island, N.Y. He was 74. Threlkeld was driving his 2008 Mini Cooper in Amagansett when he collided with a propane tanker, according to the East Hampton Police Department. He was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital, not far from his home in East Hampton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2003 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
First, Maria Shriver was seen as the spoiler -- the one person with the power to veto a run for governor by her husband, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and she was expected to use it. Then, when Schwarzenegger surprised the political world and announced he was running after all, Shriver turned into the public backer.
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