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Richard Levinson

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Considering he's one of the most iconic of TV characters, the brilliant, rumpled bed of a detective Lt. Columbo had quite an inauspicious start. William Link and his late writing and producing partner Richard Levinson first introduced Columbo in a minor role in a 1960 episode called "Enough Rope" of the long-forgotten NBC anthology series "The Chevy Mystery Show." Bert Freed played the raincoat clad detective who would always give "enough rope" to a murderer so they would be tripped up by quirky Columbo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
'That Certain Summer' Hal Holbrook and Martin Sheen played longtime companions in this milestone drama penned by Richard Levinson and William Link. 'The Night Stalker' Dan Curtis produced this cult favorite starring Darren McGavin as a reporter who believes a serial killer is actually a vampire. 'The Glass House' Tom Gries directed this prison drama shot at Utah State Prison starring Alan Alda and Kristoffer Tabori.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
'That Certain Summer' Hal Holbrook and Martin Sheen played longtime companions in this milestone drama penned by Richard Levinson and William Link. 'The Night Stalker' Dan Curtis produced this cult favorite starring Darren McGavin as a reporter who believes a serial killer is actually a vampire. 'The Glass House' Tom Gries directed this prison drama shot at Utah State Prison starring Alan Alda and Kristoffer Tabori.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Considering he's one of the most iconic of TV characters, the brilliant, rumpled bed of a detective Lt. Columbo had quite an inauspicious start. William Link and his late writing and producing partner Richard Levinson first introduced Columbo in a minor role in a 1960 episode called "Enough Rope" of the long-forgotten NBC anthology series "The Chevy Mystery Show." Bert Freed played the raincoat clad detective who would always give "enough rope" to a murderer so they would be tripped up by quirky Columbo.
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
My vote for Humanitarian of the Year goes to Enos Cabell. Enos displayed real dignity and courage when incriminating J. R. Richard while giving his testimony during the drug trial in Pittsburgh. J. R. Richard has been out of baseball for two years, recovering from a life-threatening stroke. It certainly was altruistic of Enos to come forward with a yet unmentioned name. Why not blacken the guy's name now that he is out of baseball? I wonder if Enos would have incriminated his own wife if she had been doing cocaine five years ago. RICHARD LEVINSON Encino
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1996
Although I enjoyed David Kronke's story on disaster films, old and new, I was rather dismayed that the only words he had for the film "Rollercoaster" were negative ("Disasters Just Waiting to Happen," June 30). Sure, it was marketed under the umbrella of your '70s disaster film (with Sensurround in tow), but anybody who avoided it for that sole reason missed a taut cat-and-mouse thriller, co-written by Emmy winners Richard Levinson and William Link (the creators of "Columbo"). Add to that the incredibly unique and complex score by Lalo Schifrin ("Mission: Impossible")
OPINION
April 13, 2004
Re "Fundamentally, Bush Works on Faith," Opinion, April 11: Faith requires quiet reflection and more than a bit of self-doubt, because you can never really be sure you are hearing the voice of God or just voices in your head. Reflection and self-doubt are characteristics not usually associated with this president, and he certainly should not be congratulated for his in-by-9, out-by-5 approach to divining God's will. (Bible in the morning, bombs in the afternoon.) Being devout is not the same as being right, a distinction that many Americans seem increasingly incapable of making.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Detroit health officials said last week that they are seeing a growing number of pregnant women, both poor and affluent, who are taking cocaine during labor to speed delivery. They said the practice, which is said to be spreading across the United States, endangers both the baby and the mother. "I think it would be more important to publicize the dangers rather than the benefits because it is so highly dangerous that I can see no benefits whatsoever," said Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2011
'Love Among the Ruins' Multi-Emmy Award-winning 1975 romantic comedy that marked the only pairing of Katharine Hepburn and Laurence Olivier. George Cukor directed. 'That Certain Summer' Landmark 1972 TV movie, penned by Richard Levinson and William Link, about a teenage boy (Scott Jacoby) who learns that his divorced father (Hal Holbrook) is gay and in a relationship with a young man (Martin Sheen). 'My Sweet Charlie' Levinson and Link also wrote this 1970 TV movie starring Patty Duke in an Emmy Award-winning role as a young pregnant Southern girl who finds an unlikely ally in a black New York attorney (Al Freeman Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
All those intricate plot twists in last week's acclaimed CBS movie "Vanishing Act"--written by "Columbo" creators Richard Levinson and William Link--couldn't hide the fact that this one had been seen before. And before. And. . . . In fact, the Mike Farrell-Elliott Gould-Margot Kidder mystery, about a husband who reports his wife missing and later claims that the woman who finally shows up isn't his wife, is the fourth adaptation of Robert Thomas' old play, "Trap For a Lonely Man."
OPINION
April 13, 2004
Re "Fundamentally, Bush Works on Faith," Opinion, April 11: Faith requires quiet reflection and more than a bit of self-doubt, because you can never really be sure you are hearing the voice of God or just voices in your head. Reflection and self-doubt are characteristics not usually associated with this president, and he certainly should not be congratulated for his in-by-9, out-by-5 approach to divining God's will. (Bible in the morning, bombs in the afternoon.) Being devout is not the same as being right, a distinction that many Americans seem increasingly incapable of making.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1996
Although I enjoyed David Kronke's story on disaster films, old and new, I was rather dismayed that the only words he had for the film "Rollercoaster" were negative ("Disasters Just Waiting to Happen," June 30). Sure, it was marketed under the umbrella of your '70s disaster film (with Sensurround in tow), but anybody who avoided it for that sole reason missed a taut cat-and-mouse thriller, co-written by Emmy winners Richard Levinson and William Link (the creators of "Columbo"). Add to that the incredibly unique and complex score by Lalo Schifrin ("Mission: Impossible")
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
My vote for Humanitarian of the Year goes to Enos Cabell. Enos displayed real dignity and courage when incriminating J. R. Richard while giving his testimony during the drug trial in Pittsburgh. J. R. Richard has been out of baseball for two years, recovering from a life-threatening stroke. It certainly was altruistic of Enos to come forward with a yet unmentioned name. Why not blacken the guy's name now that he is out of baseball? I wonder if Enos would have incriminated his own wife if she had been doing cocaine five years ago. RICHARD LEVINSON Encino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1987
A top Los Angles Police Department spokesman for the last 22 years said he will retire at the end of the year because, "Why not? There's more to life than news." Lt. Dan Cooke, in charge of the day-to-day operations of the Press Relations Unit, said Saturday that he decided about two weeks ago to retire after his wife's surgery and the funerals of two close friends, Times reporter Bill Farr and television producer Richard Levinson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2004 | Don Shirley
Pass the raincoat. Columbo is making an appearance minus Peter Falk. In "Prescription Murder," which opened Friday at the West Valley Playhouse in Canoga Park, the famous detective is played by Bob Van Dusen. A Falkless Columbo is not unprecedented. The first Columbo was actor Bert Freed in a one-hour live TV special in 1961. That show's writers, Richard Levinson and William Link, then wrote "Prescription Murder," which opened in San Francisco with Thomas Mitchell as the detective.
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