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Richard Li

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October 20, 1992 | Li is deputy chairman of Hong Kong's Star TV and the son of the colony's richest man. His father, Li Ka-shing, heads the parent Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. financial empire, which operates five core businesses: real estate, container terminals, telecommunications, energy and retail. Sent to the United States to study at age 14, the younger Li says the experience shaped his attitudes about satellite television: and
By living abroad, I found that there is much more commonality than differences amongst people in this world. I believe satellite television helps people to see such similarities. I think it is very beneficial socially for people to understand this. . . . Asia is the developing television market. . . . We are giving our viewers five channels, including BBC World Service Television, MTV, a Mandarin-language entertainment channel, an English-language entertainment channel and a sports channel. . .
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BUSINESS
May 21, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His rise was mercurial, his fall spectacular. Now one of Asia's best-known business whiz kids, 34-year-old Richard Li, says he may be ready to give up day-to-day responsibility for running Pacific Century CyberWorks, the once-promising start-up he launched onto the Hong Kong stock market with such flare barely two years ago.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 1994 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an office unusually Spartan for one of Hong Kong's business elite, Richard Li calls out to his secretary to bring him a pen. "I'm in transition . . . moving from one office into another," explains Li, who last year turned down an offer from his father, billionaire Li Kashing, to be managing director of Hutchison Whampoa Ltd., the flagship conglomerate of the family empire. Instead, he accepted a lesser position in the family firm and set up his own company, Pacific Century Group.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year at this time, the poster child for Asia's dot-com craze was Hong Kong entrepreneur Richard Li--the upbeat chairman of a flashy new company called Pacific Century CyberWorks Ltd. who cast himself as a Stanford grad with a can't-miss vision for the future. But falls have been fast for "new-economy" companies in Asia, and the situation has deteriorated so much that Li didn't even show up Wednesday when PCCW announced its annual results at a packed news conference.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year at this time, the poster child for Asia's dot-com craze was Hong Kong entrepreneur Richard Li--the upbeat chairman of a flashy new company called Pacific Century CyberWorks Ltd. who cast himself as a Stanford grad with a can't-miss vision for the future. But falls have been fast for "new-economy" companies in Asia, and the situation has deteriorated so much that Li didn't even show up Wednesday when PCCW announced its annual results at a packed news conference.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His rise was mercurial, his fall spectacular. Now one of Asia's best-known business whiz kids, 34-year-old Richard Li, says he may be ready to give up day-to-day responsibility for running Pacific Century CyberWorks, the once-promising start-up he launched onto the Hong Kong stock market with such flare barely two years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1993 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guns N' Roses are rocking on MTV, but 26-year-old Richard Li Tzar-kai Li doesn't notice. "Lou Grant," the BBC news, a Mandarin-language soap opera and a tennis tournament are playing on the four other TV screens in his office, but Li ignores them, too--he's busy snapping orders at one of his executives. Li's Star TV is the hottest thing in global television, a pan-regional network that's beating out potential rivals and astonishing advertisers.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
American International Group Inc. agreed to sell its external fund management business to Hong Kong billionaire Richard Li's Pacific Century Group for about $500 million. The deal would lift to $9.8 billion the amount AIG will have raised through announced divestitures since its $182.5-billion government rescue 12 months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Jason Song
A 16-year-old boy died Sunday in an apparent gang-related shooting, a Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department spokesman said. Deputies discovered Jason Ledesma around 3 p.m. in the 17900 block of East Valley Boulevard, said Deputy Richard Li. Ledesma had been shot several times, and deputies determined the incident was gang-related, Li said. Ledesma died at the scene, authorities said.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2000 | Tyler Marshall
Asian media mogul Richard Li signed a long-anticipated agreement linking his company, Pacific Century CyberWorks, with Australia's Telstra Corp. in an Internet and telecommunications alliance. As part of the deal, PCCW will receive an immediate $3.55-billion cash payment, which is expected to be used to reduce a mountain of debt run up by the company during a string of recent acquisitions.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1994 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an office unusually Spartan for one of Hong Kong's business elite, Richard Li calls out to his secretary to bring him a pen. "I'm in transition . . . moving from one office into another," explains Li, who last year turned down an offer from his father, billionaire Li Kashing, to be managing director of Hutchison Whampoa Ltd., the flagship conglomerate of the family empire. Instead, he accepted a lesser position in the family firm and set up his own company, Pacific Century Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1993 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guns N' Roses are rocking on MTV, but 26-year-old Richard Li Tzar-kai Li doesn't notice. "Lou Grant," the BBC news, a Mandarin-language soap opera and a tennis tournament are playing on the four other TV screens in his office, but Li ignores them, too--he's busy snapping orders at one of his executives. Li's Star TV is the hottest thing in global television, a pan-regional network that's beating out potential rivals and astonishing advertisers.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | Li is deputy chairman of Hong Kong's Star TV and the son of the colony's richest man. His father, Li Ka-shing, heads the parent Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. financial empire, which operates five core businesses: real estate, container terminals, telecommunications, energy and retail. Sent to the United States to study at age 14, the younger Li says the experience shaped his attitudes about satellite television: and
By living abroad, I found that there is much more commonality than differences amongst people in this world. I believe satellite television helps people to see such similarities. I think it is very beneficial socially for people to understand this. . . . Asia is the developing television market. . . . We are giving our viewers five channels, including BBC World Service Television, MTV, a Mandarin-language entertainment channel, an English-language entertainment channel and a sports channel. . .
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