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Richard Long

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
Lightly is the operative word with Richard Long. The tall, lithe British artist moves lightly around his work, his crisp, softly spoken words barely mixing with the air around him. Of the long, solitary walks that form the basis for his art works, Long says, "I travel lightly. I touch the world lightly." Shaking off theories and complex interpretations of his work as if oppressive weights, Long sticks to a light, lean vocabulary and common sense.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
By the time this article is published, British artist Richard Long will be doing what he likes best--walking alone in the wilderness. Occasionally, as his spirit and the landscape move him, he will construct a sculpture of natural materials, photograph it, then continue on his way. Or he may simply store up the experience and translate it into a work that brings some of the outdoors, and his reaction to it, into his next museum or gallery show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For nearly 35 years, Richard Long has been making his mark upon the earth gently, through the soulful art of taking walks in the countryside, aligning stones in a circle, making a ring of handprints on a wall or pondering the shifting direction of the wind. He thinks of his work as a ritualization of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For nearly 35 years, Richard Long has been making his mark upon the earth gently, through the soulful art of taking walks in the countryside, aligning stones in a circle, making a ring of handprints on a wall or pondering the shifting direction of the wind. He thinks of his work as a ritualization of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
By the time this article is published, British artist Richard Long will be doing what he likes best--walking alone in the wilderness. Occasionally, as his spirit and the landscape move him, he will construct a sculpture of natural materials, photograph it, then continue on his way. Or he may simply store up the experience and translate it into a work that brings some of the outdoors, and his reaction to it, into his next museum or gallery show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Like Eric Orr, Victor Raphael works with the touch of an alchemist, infusing inert materials with magical properties. Applying metal leaf onto abstract Polaroids, he transforms fuzzy snapshots into metaphysical talismans that pulsate with the heat of glowing coals.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday let stand a precedent-setting, $46,000 damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer for violating the rights of a policeman he ejected from a public meeting on police surveillance practices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand a damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer charged with violating the rights of a Newport Beach policeman who was ejected from a public meeting on police surveillance. The court, ruling without comment, rejected arguments that ACLU lawyer Rees Lloyd did not violate Officer Richard Long's rights when he ordered him to leave a 1980 ACLU meeting open to the public.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand a precedent-setting damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer charged with violating the rights of a Newport Beach policeman by ejecting him from a public meeting on police surveillance practices. The court, ruling without comment, rejected arguments that ACLU lawyer Rees Lloyd of Los Angeles did not violate Officer Richard Long's rights when he ordered him to leave a 1980 ACLU meeting that was open to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling attacked by civil rights lawyers as damaging to freedom of speech, a state court of appeals upheld a $46,000 award against a former ACLU attorney who tried to eject a Newport Beach police officer from a public debate on police abuse. In an opinion released Tuesday, three judges of the 4th District Court of Appeal affirmed the 1987 verdict of an Orange County Superior Court jury, which decided in favor of Officer Richard T. Long and against ACLU attorney Rees Lloyd.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Long, co-founder of racing and mountain bike maker GT Bicycles Inc., was killed Friday in a traffic accident while riding his new motorcycle to a bicycle race at Big Bear Lake. Long, 46, died just a week before his company's innovative new design for a racing bicycle will debut for the U.S. Cycling Team's track racing squad at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand a damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer charged with violating the rights of a Newport Beach policeman who was ejected from a public meeting on police surveillance. The court, ruling without comment, rejected arguments that ACLU lawyer Rees Lloyd did not violate Officer Richard Long's rights when he ordered him to leave a 1980 ACLU meeting open to the public.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand a precedent-setting damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer charged with violating the rights of a Newport Beach policeman by ejecting him from a public meeting on police surveillance practices. The court, ruling without comment, rejected arguments that ACLU lawyer Rees Lloyd of Los Angeles did not violate Officer Richard Long's rights when he ordered him to leave a 1980 ACLU meeting that was open to the public.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday let stand a precedent-setting, $46,000 damage award against a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer for violating the rights of a policeman he ejected from a public meeting on police surveillance practices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling attacked by civil rights lawyers as damaging to freedom of speech, a state court of appeals upheld a $46,000 award against a former ACLU attorney who tried to eject a Newport Beach police officer from a public debate on police abuse. In an opinion released Tuesday, three judges of the 4th District Court of Appeal affirmed the 1987 verdict of an Orange County Superior Court jury, which decided in favor of Officer Richard T. Long and against ACLU attorney Rees Lloyd.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
Lightly is the operative word with Richard Long. The tall, lithe British artist moves lightly around his work, his crisp, softly spoken words barely mixing with the air around him. Of the long, solitary walks that form the basis for his art works, Long says, "I travel lightly. I touch the world lightly." Shaking off theories and complex interpretations of his work as if oppressive weights, Long sticks to a light, lean vocabulary and common sense.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Long, co-founder of racing and mountain bike maker GT Bicycles Inc., was killed Friday in a traffic accident while riding his new motorcycle to a bicycle race at Big Bear Lake. Long, 46, died just a week before his company's innovative new design for a racing bicycle will debut for the U.S. Cycling Team's track racing squad at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.
NEWS
May 10, 2005
Richard Newman Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Like Eric Orr, Victor Raphael works with the touch of an alchemist, infusing inert materials with magical properties. Applying metal leaf onto abstract Polaroids, he transforms fuzzy snapshots into metaphysical talismans that pulsate with the heat of glowing coals.
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