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Richard Lubetzky

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NEWS
July 25, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Richard Lubetzky's fingerprint had not been found on an obscene post card, he might be a lawyer by now. But it was and he isn't. Therein hangs a tale as complicated as a billionaire's will, one that offers a rare--and still unfolding--glimpse behind closed-door disciplinary proceedings of the California State Bar.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000
The outrageous arrogance and hypocrisy of the "freedom-loving" people who now hold Elian Gonzalez hostage is enough to take one's breath away. And given the shameless exploitation of this unfortunate child by his new "family," their numerous broken promises to hand him over to his father, as well as their disregard for the rule of law, combined with the systemic corruption and pervasive lawlessness of south Florida, I can only conclude that Elian will...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998
The Times fails to mention in "Cases Against Lawyers Pile Up After Bar Layoffs" (Oct. 12) that the State Bar of California dismisses 90% of all consumer complaints with little or no investigation. The bar is a trade association, established to protect the interests of its members. That is why it spends $450,000 a year on a lobbyist in Sacramento, rather than on investigating consumer complaints, and why it continues to resist legislative oversight and efforts to end its self-regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998
The Times fails to mention in "Cases Against Lawyers Pile Up After Bar Layoffs" (Oct. 12) that the State Bar of California dismisses 90% of all consumer complaints with little or no investigation. The bar is a trade association, established to protect the interests of its members. That is why it spends $450,000 a year on a lobbyist in Sacramento, rather than on investigating consumer complaints, and why it continues to resist legislative oversight and efforts to end its self-regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000
The outrageous arrogance and hypocrisy of the "freedom-loving" people who now hold Elian Gonzalez hostage is enough to take one's breath away. And given the shameless exploitation of this unfortunate child by his new "family," their numerous broken promises to hand him over to his father, as well as their disregard for the rule of law, combined with the systemic corruption and pervasive lawlessness of south Florida, I can only conclude that Elian will...
OPINION
July 17, 2007
Re "For Baca, home is where the jail is," July 12 As a psychiatrist with long experience in correctional settings, I find it ironic that an objection to home detention is that inmates would have reduced access to healthcare and mental healthcare. The advocates' efforts would be better spent working for mental health parity and healthcare access for all individuals, rather than working to keep these people incarcerated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Consumer advocate Richard H. Lubetzky, a longtime critic of the legal profession, finally won his arduous battle Friday to become a lawyer in California. The state Supreme Court rejected charges by the California State Bar that Lubetzky, 39, of Los Angeles was morally unfit to practice law. The justices said the evidence offered by the Bar was insufficient and ordered Lubetzky--who failed the Bar examination 13 times before passing in 1987--admitted to the profession.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marc Lafer wishes he were Victor Sifuentes: eloquent, inspiring, charismatic. But Sifuentes, the counselor former ly played by Jimmy Smits on "L.A. Law," is fictional. Lafer, like most lawyers, settled for the facts: Lafer is only Lafer. So he attended "Acting for Attorneys," a one-day course in Studio City run by two actresses who contend that lawyers must come to court with more than legal expertise and the right wardrobe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're usually on the other side of eviction proceedings--the ones who are called in to help landlords get rid of unwanted tenants. But suddenly some of Los Angeles' most prominent lawyers are the ones who are being kicked out. Dozens of attorneys are being booted from a landmark Century City skyscraper where some have operated their plushily furnished law offices for 25 years.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marc Lafer wishes he were Victor Sifuentes: eloquent, inspiring, charismatic. But Sifuentes, the counselor formerly played by Jimmy Smits on "L.A. Law," is fictional. Lafer, like most lawyers, settled for the facts: Lafer is only Lafer. So he attended "Acting for Attorneys," a one-day course run by two actresses who contend that lawyers must come to court with more than legal expertise and the right wardrobe.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Richard Lubetzky's fingerprint had not been found on an obscene post card, he might be a lawyer by now. But it was and he isn't. Therein hangs a tale as complicated as a billionaire's will, one that offers a rare--and still unfolding--glimpse behind closed-door disciplinary proceedings of the California State Bar.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't that long ago, perhaps a little more than a decade, that Lois Isenberg used to keep her mouth shut at parties. Not about everything, just about what she did for a living. It seemed that whenever she mentioned that she was an independent paralegal, an attorney would step forward and begin a nasty verbal assault. "Up until the 1980s, it was always an underground movement," Isenberg said. "We had to be quite circumspect about what we did."
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't that long ago, perhaps a little more than a decade, that Lois Isenberg used to keep her mouth shut at parties. Not about everything, just about what she did for a living. It seemed that whenever she mentioned that she was an independent paralegal, an attorney would step forward and begin a nasty verbal assault. "Up until the 1980s, it was always an underground movement," Isenberg said. "We had to be quite circumspect about what we did."
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