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Richard Luce

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October 3, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Richard Luce, tall, slim, gray-suited minister for the Arts and minister of State, Privy Council Office, and by any titles the very model of British officialdom, made a flying visit to Los Angeles last week to talk with arts-community leaders. Luce met with officials at the Getty Museum, KCET-TV, City Hall and other establishments where support of the arts is, in one form or another, Topic A.
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October 3, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Richard Luce, tall, slim, gray-suited minister for the Arts and minister of State, Privy Council Office, and by any titles the very model of British officialdom, made a flying visit to Los Angeles last week to talk with arts-community leaders. Luce met with officials at the Getty Museum, KCET-TV, City Hall and other establishments where support of the arts is, in one form or another, Topic A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Vincent van Gogh's masterpiece "Sunflowers," auctioned for a record $39.9 million in March, won't be hanging on any walls for at least six months at Yasuda Fire and Marine Insurance, Japan's second biggest insurance company. British Junior Arts Minister Richard Luce said Thursday he had suspended a decision on the export license for half a year to allow a British buyer to raise enough money to purchase the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The fight over the huge personal art collection of Swiss industrialist Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza may be over. British Arts Minister Richard Luce told Parliament the government had withdrawn its proposal to house the collection, rated in the art world as second in importance only to that of Queen Elizabeth. The British drop-out was based on the baron's recent promise to lend most of his collection to Spain for 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987
Britain on Thursday blocked the export of one of the most expensive paintings in the world after determining that the work by Frenchman Edouard Manet was a national asset. The decision announced by Arts Minister Richard Luce gives a British institution another chance to buy "La Rue Mosnier aux Paveurs," which sold for $12.1 million at a London auction on Dec. 1.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | Reuters
Britain said today that it has dropped a bid to acquire one of the world's greatest private art collections, belonging to Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, after hearing he provisionally agreed to lend most of it to Spain for 10 years. British Arts Minister Richard Luce told Parliament that the government has withdrawn its proposal to house the collection, rated in the art world as second in importance only to that of Queen Elizabeth II.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | Reuters
Britain said on Friday it had dropped a bid to acquire one of the world's greatest private art collections, belonging to Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, after hearing that he had provisionally agreed to lend most of it to Spain for 10 years. British Arts Minister Richard Luce told Parliament that the government had withdrawn its proposal to house the private collection, rated in the art world as second in importance only to that of Queen Elizabeth II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1986 | Jane Applegate
A Laguna Niguel man who sued his employer for laying him off his job because he was suffering from leukemia accepted an undisclosed settlement from the company late Wednesday. The settlement was reached two days into a federal court trial on the case filed by Charles Bryant, 62. Bryant sued the Brunswick Corp. of Costa Mesa for $1 million, claiming he was laid off his job as a senior buyer in October, 1983, because he was experiencing side effects from his chemotherapy. "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
If the commercial theaters in London's West End are finding it hard to present new shows with popular appeal, their problems seem trivial compared to the woes of the government-funded Royal Shakespeare Company. The RSC, with a current 2.9-million ($4.8-million) deficit, is closing its two London theaters, the Barbican and the adjacent Pit, for four months in November to cut costs. "It seems we have no other option," said Terry Hands, RSC artistic director and chief executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1986 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
Was Charles Bryant fired from his job at Brunswick Corp. because he is suffering from leukemia or because he had attitude problems and was considered expendable during a layoff? On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson decided to put the question to a jury and set a Sept. 30 trial date for the lawsuit filed by Bryant against his former employer.
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