Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard M
IN THE NEWS

Richard M

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley returned home Saturday after a one-week hospitalization in an intensive care unit because of an unspecified illness, his law firm said. Feeling ill, the 71-year-old Daley walked straight from a plane into an ambulance after returning to Chicago from a business trip to Arizona on Jan. 31. He underwent several tests, but a spokeswoman for his law firm did not elaborate this week on whether doctors were able to determine what caused Daley to feel disoriented.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's most famous "country club prison," once the domain of such celebrity felons as inside trader Ivan Boesky and Watergate figure H.R. Haldeman, is shutting down. The Lompoc Federal Prison Camp is being converted into a higher security federal prison. A prison with fences and razor wire instead of small "off-limits" signs around the property. A prison where inmates have to wear khaki uniforms instead of shorts and T-shirts. A prison where inmates can't play tennis in the afternoon.
OPINION
January 30, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Almost on impulse, almost 35 years ago, Richard M. Walden and a friend rounded up six tons of relief supplies and a jet to ferry them to Vietnamese boat people in Malaysia. Thus was Operation California - now Operation USA - born. A Times headline soon called him the "charity buccaneer," a red-tape-slashing contrarian who fretted about the "international web of neglect," and who still has sharp words for relief efforts unmet and relief agencies that don't measure up. He has steadfast celebrity supporters, like Julie Andrews, but the advent of social media that let anyone text a few bucks to Lady Gaga's favorite charity in the middle of a concert has made things harder for brick-and-mortar charities like Operation USA. Walden soldiers on, boldly going where too many charity-come-latelies can only try to go. You began in 1979 as Operation California; now it's Operation USA. Our legal name is Operation California.
OPINION
January 30, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Almost on impulse, almost 35 years ago, Richard M. Walden and a friend rounded up six tons of relief supplies and a jet to ferry them to Vietnamese boat people in Malaysia. Thus was Operation California - now Operation USA - born. A Times headline soon called him the "charity buccaneer," a red-tape-slashing contrarian who fretted about the "international web of neglect," and who still has sharp words for relief efforts unmet and relief agencies that don't measure up. He has steadfast celebrity supporters, like Julie Andrews, but the advent of social media that let anyone text a few bucks to Lady Gaga's favorite charity in the middle of a concert has made things harder for brick-and-mortar charities like Operation USA. Walden soldiers on, boldly going where too many charity-come-latelies can only try to go. You began in 1979 as Operation California; now it's Operation USA. Our legal name is Operation California.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Henry J. Cousine--a police ring on his finger, an LAPD tattoo on his leg and battle scars on his body--says the officers accused of beating Rodney G. King swung their batons like "little girls." Then he ticks off some of his own episodes of violence during a decade as a beat cop: three fights and three shootings. "You get in my face, I'm going to fight back," Cousine said. "You swing at me, I'm going to knock you off your feet. And you pull a gun, I'll kill you."
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley remained hospitalized in an intensive care unit Saturday, his law firm said. Feeling ill, the 71-year-old Daley walked straight from a plane into an ambulance after returning to Chicago on Friday evening from a business trip to Arizona, according to a statement released by his spokesman and law firm. His father died of a heart attack at age 74, and the former mayor has been hospitalized at least two times since 2000. His family is visiting him between tests at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Daley spokesman Rick Jasculca said in the statement.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | RITA PYRILLIS, Times Staff Writer
Everyone calls it the Century Freeway. But that's not its name. The freeway, which is under construction, actually has two names. West of the San Diego Freeway, it is officially designated the El Segundo Freeway; east of the San Diego Freeway it is the Norwalk Freeway. Now, in a tribute to Congressman Glenn M. Anderson (D-Long Beach), state senators have voted to rename the freeway in recognition of his work in funding numerous area transportation projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An NBC attorney attempted Friday to persuade federal appeals court judges in Pasadena to strike down the largest libel verdict against an American news organization--a $5.3-million judgment that the network defamed singer Wayne Newton in newscasts that linked him to organized crime figures. NBC lawyer Floyd Abrams said the stories were the product of aggressive reporting, not ill will, and should be protected by the First Amendment. But Newton's lawyer, Morton R.
NEWS
April 14, 1990
Richard M. Kain, 81, an authority and prolific author on writer James Joyce. A retired professor of English and Irish literature at the University of Louisville, Kain had served as trustee of the James Joyce Foundation and was on the editorial board of James Joyce Quarterly. Among his books were "Joyce: The Man, the Work, the Reputation" and "Dublin in the Age of W.B. Yeats and James Joyce." In Louisville on April 5.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel planned to meet privately with Rep. Jesse L. Jackson Jr. of Illinois on Wednesday night to discuss the Chicago mayor's race, according to two people familiar with the plan. The meeting follows Emanuel's decision to commission a poll testing his viability as a mayoral candidate, and as he tries to help the White House retain Democratic majorities in Congress. Jackson and Emanuel are considered potential successors to Richard M. Daley, who said last week that he would not run for reelection next year.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's decision to leave City Hall, announced Tuesday, set in motion a chain of events that could ultimately lead to a leadership shuffle at the White House. Rahm Emanuel, the president's chief of staff, has been pining for that office for months, telling people he wanted to leave the Obama administration to run for mayor if Daley, a friend, decided not to. Fresh on the heels of Daley's announcement, Emanuel avoided saying anything about his own plans, instead releasing a one-sentence statement praising the mayor's time in office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
White House tapes released Tuesday capture Richard Nixon as a pugnacious second-term president who talks of hammering out an end to the Vietnam War even if he has to "cut off the head" of the South Vietnamese leader, remarks that an abortion might be necessary if a pregnancy involved an interracial couple and appears preoccupied with savaging his political foes. As Nixon was negotiating an end to U.S.
BOOKS
January 27, 2008 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, a former Times book critic, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
HE wrote his first book review for the New Republic in 1934, when he was 19, and his last for the New York Review of Books in 1998, weeks before his death at 83. In those 64 years, if you were to reduce magazine format to newspaper column inches, Alfred Kazin produced -- what: a mile of criticism? Two miles? Three?
NATIONAL
February 20, 2004 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Richard M. Daley publicly endorsed same-sex unions this week, saying he had "no problem" with Cook County issuing marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples, because they "love one another just as much as anyone else." Daley -- a Roman Catholic who has taken a liberal stand on other social issues -- declined to say if the country's third-largest city would follow the cue of San Francisco, where thousands of marriage certificates have been issued to same-sex couples in the last week.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | John Lukacs, John Lukacs is the author of many books, including "At the End of an Age."
Consider the following statements: "The greatest human power for good, the most efficient earthly tool for the uplifting of nations, is without question the United States." The United States "must rise to the responsibilities of its position and put the commandments of God into action unilaterally, and then watch the effects on a startled world." "The power of organized evil in this world could be only challenged by the organizing forces of righteousness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1996
Richard M. Powell, 79, radio and television comedy writer and executive of the Writers Guild. Born in Cincinnati, Powell began writing for radio in the mid-1940s and segued into television as it developed. He wrote for such comedians as Bob Hope and Lucille Ball and for the series "The Andy Griffith Show," "MASH," "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Hogan's Heroes" and "Quincy." Powell served as president of the Television-Radio Branch of the Writers Guild from 1968 until 1970.
NEWS
February 28, 1997
Richard M. Ray Sr., 68, publisher and editor of books about gardening. Ray founded and was president of Horticultural Sales Products of Coronado, which in recent years turned from books to toy kits that teach children about plants, worms and the ecosystem. One of his products, Root-Vue Farms, won the prestigious toy industry Oppenheim Gold Seal for safe and effective educational toys.
BOOKS
May 26, 2002 | James Tate
Speaking of sunsets, last night's was shocking. I mean, sunsets aren't supposed to frighten you, are they? Well, this one was terrifying. People were screaming in the streets. Sure, it was beautiful, but far too beautiful. It wasn't natural. One climax followed another and then another until your knees went weak and you couldn't breathe.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|