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Richard M Coleman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989
Schneider's article on abortion blandly states that the issue is one of faith versus reason. I read the article curious to see how one could "reason" to a pro-abortion stance and explain the scientific facts regarding the life, humanity and early viability of the fetus as "faith." My curiosity went unsatisfied; nowhere in the article's 30 paragraphs is there any such explanation. Schneider has it backwards as is evidenced by the concentration of pro-abortion arguments onthe emotional issues of rape and incest when, in fact, 98% of the 1.5 million abortions a year in the United States involve neither.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was, perhaps, the only way that this lawsuit could have ended. After a 6 1/2-year legal free-for-all, the Marciano brothers, creators of Guess jeans, won back full control Wednesday of that garment industry gold mine from their archenemies, the Nakash brothers, founders of Jordache.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was, perhaps, the only way that this lawsuit could have ended. After a 6 1/2-year legal free-for-all, the Marciano brothers, creators of Guess jeans, won back full control Wednesday of that garment industry gold mine from their archenemies, the Nakash brothers, founders of Jordache.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989
Schneider's article on abortion blandly states that the issue is one of faith versus reason. I read the article curious to see how one could "reason" to a pro-abortion stance and explain the scientific facts regarding the life, humanity and early viability of the fetus as "faith." My curiosity went unsatisfied; nowhere in the article's 30 paragraphs is there any such explanation. Schneider has it backwards as is evidenced by the concentration of pro-abortion arguments onthe emotional issues of rape and incest when, in fact, 98% of the 1.5 million abortions a year in the United States involve neither.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
It comes as no surprise but President Clinton did not tell the truth when he stated that the "health" exception he urged to the vetoed bill banning partial-birth abortion was "a minor amendment" (May 24). The Supreme Court has defined "health" to include even emotional upset so that there would be no case where a "health" claim could not be made. Clinton knows this and also knows that the medical evidence at the congressional hearings established that the hypothetical situation he described in his speech does not exist.
OPINION
January 18, 2003
Norah Vincent is the one with the "Wrong Focus in Abortion Issue" (Commentary, Jan. 9). She completely misses both the humane and the legal point of the abortion debate. By stating that abortion "legally speaking, has nothing to do with women's bodies" she shows her ignorance of pregnancy, let alone what the right to privacy (i.e., the right to control one's body) means to a pregnant woman, who also happens to be human and deserving of constitutional protection. With regard to her conclusion that the pro-choice side should cede the third trimester, that decision has already been made -- by the U.S. Supreme Court.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The legal battle that wouldn't die is heading back to court. After 6 1/2 years and $80 million in legal fees, the war over ownership of Los Angeles-based Guess clothing--otherwise settled Wednesday when the company's feuding owners agreed to a multimillion-dollar truce--will go back before a judge to determine whether a partially completed jury verdict form should be read or destroyed.
NEWS
October 8, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The attorney for an author whose book was not included in the New York Times' coveted best-seller list asked the state Supreme Court on Tuesday to allow the writer to proceed with an unusual damage suit against the newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1986 | WEBSTER K. NOLAN, United Press International
It's 2 a.m., you're still tossing and turning and the sandman is nowhere in sight. What to do? Chores, says an insomnia expert at the Stanford University Medical School. "The worst thing to do is to try hard to go to sleep," said Richard M. Coleman, author of the just-published "Wide Awake at 3:00 A.M.: By Choice or by Chance?" "Get up and do some chores," Coleman said in an interview.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | ANN LEVIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At a time when most people are preparing for work, a dozen men just off the night shift pull into the parking lot at the Roy Wilkens Recreation Center in Queens. Inside the sunny gymnasium, they strip down to shorts and T-shirts and begin shooting layups, watched by Charles Coleman, a Trans World Airlines maintenance worker who founded the basketball league for shift workers three years ago.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an intense debate in which several delegates threatened to resign, the American Bar Assn. went on record for the first time Tuesday in support of a woman's constitutional right to choose abortion.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Nearly two-thirds of American industrial workers regularly fall asleep on the job, leading to safety risks and poor performance, according to the largest U.S. study ever on the subject. The brunt of alertness problems are borne by shift workers--electric utility operators, oil and chemical plant employees and factory workers who rotate through day, evening and night shifts at plants open around the clock--the study of 7,400 workers by three California researchers found. The authors of the study, scheduled for release today at the annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society in Atlanta, take the nuclear industry, in particular, to task for failing to make the basic changes in scheduling and work rules that research and experience have found can reduce sleepiness on the job. Like many employers, the study says, the nuclear industry has relied on overstaffing of shifts and disciplining of sleepy workers to combat job fatigue.
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