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March 23, 1989
Front-runner Richard M. Daley, fearing his two opponents would gang up on him, skipped the only televised debate of the Chicago mayoral campaign, forcing his rivals into a surprisingly bitter battle between themselves. The two underdogs, third-party candidate Timothy C. Evans and Republican nominee Edward R. Vrdolyak, had been expected to devote much of the hourlong debate to mauling Daley for refusing to appear with them.
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NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley returned home Saturday after a one-week hospitalization in an intensive care unit because of an unspecified illness, his law firm said. Feeling ill, the 71-year-old Daley walked straight from a plane into an ambulance after returning to Chicago from a business trip to Arizona on Jan. 31. He underwent several tests, but a spokeswoman for his law firm did not elaborate this week on whether doctors were able to determine what caused Daley to feel disoriented.
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NATIONAL
February 20, 2004 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Richard M. Daley publicly endorsed same-sex unions this week, saying he had "no problem" with Cook County issuing marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples, because they "love one another just as much as anyone else." Daley -- a Roman Catholic who has taken a liberal stand on other social issues -- declined to say if the country's third-largest city would follow the cue of San Francisco, where thousands of marriage certificates have been issued to same-sex couples in the last week.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2011 | Christi Parsons
William Daley was born with one of the most fortunate family names in Democratic politics. But life has not been one long lucky streak for the man who, for instance, chaired Al Gore's failed presidential campaign in 2000. Still, when President Obama chose the youngest son of Chicago's legendary mayoral dynasty as his new chief of staff Thursday, he picked someone known as an achiever in politics, government and business. Daley is a "steady-as-you-go" executive who brings practical experience to a White House that needs it, said Sam Skinner, who was a chief of staff to President George H.W. Bush and who has known Daley for years.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's decision to leave City Hall, announced Tuesday, set in motion a chain of events that could ultimately lead to a leadership shuffle at the White House. Rahm Emanuel, the president's chief of staff, has been pining for that office for months, telling people he wanted to leave the Obama administration to run for mayor if Daley, a friend, decided not to. Fresh on the heels of Daley's announcement, Emanuel avoided saying anything about his own plans, instead releasing a one-sentence statement praising the mayor's time in office.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's $433-million lawsuit against the firearms industry was dismissed by a judge who said the mayor might do better to combat city crime through law enforcement methods and legislation. Cook County Circuit Judge Stephen Schiller questioned the city's use of statistics, showing that many guns used in gang shootings in Chicago were purchased at suburban gun shops, many by so-called straw purchasers who bought them for resale to criminals.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley remained hospitalized and was undergoing more tests after complaining of chest pain. Doctors said the 57-year-old mayor's blood pressure returned to normal soon after he was rushed to Northwestern Memorial Hospital from his home Saturday afternoon. Daley still must undergo tests to ensure his arteries aren't blocked and to find out why he felt ill, doctors said.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Cook County State's Atty. Richard M. Daley leads in the mayoral race, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson--who isn't running--would be his toughest competitor, a poll has found. Daley, son of the late Mayor Richard J. Daley, would garner 52% of the vote, while fellow Democrat Jackson would get 40% in a one-on-one race, according to results of a poll in Sunday editions of the Chicago Tribune.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley won a sixth term with more than 70% of the vote, overcoming a City Hall corruption scandal and putting himself on course to eclipse his legendary father's record as the city's longest-serving mayor. Serving out another full four-year term would keep him on the job for 22 years. His father, Richard J. Daley, died in office in 1976 at age 74, having served 21 years.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley named an aide to former public school chief executive Paul Vallas to replace him as head of the nation's third-largest school system. Arne Duncan, 36, will preside over a school system with 435,000 students, 45,900 employees and a $3.5-billion annual budget. Vallas resigned June 7 after six years as CEO of Chicago Public Schools. Duncan became the deputy chief of staff in 1999 after working since 1998 as director of magnet schools for the city's board of
NATIONAL
September 16, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel planned to meet privately with Rep. Jesse L. Jackson Jr. of Illinois on Wednesday night to discuss the Chicago mayor's race, according to two people familiar with the plan. The meeting follows Emanuel's decision to commission a poll testing his viability as a mayoral candidate, and as he tries to help the White House retain Democratic majorities in Congress. Jackson and Emanuel are considered potential successors to Richard M. Daley, who said last week that he would not run for reelection next year.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's decision to leave City Hall, announced Tuesday, set in motion a chain of events that could ultimately lead to a leadership shuffle at the White House. Rahm Emanuel, the president's chief of staff, has been pining for that office for months, telling people he wanted to leave the Obama administration to run for mayor if Daley, a friend, decided not to. Fresh on the heels of Daley's announcement, Emanuel avoided saying anything about his own plans, instead releasing a one-sentence statement praising the mayor's time in office.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley won a sixth term with more than 70% of the vote, overcoming a City Hall corruption scandal and putting himself on course to eclipse his legendary father's record as the city's longest-serving mayor. Serving out another full four-year term would keep him on the job for 22 years. His father, Richard J. Daley, died in office in 1976 at age 74, having served 21 years.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal monitor reviewing hiring practices at Chicago City Hall wants an executive order from Mayor Richard Daley that protects city employees who cooperate with her investigation. The executive order is necessary because it sends a message "that people who have provided information or may want to do that in the future aren't going to be retaliated against," said Noelle Brennan, the courtappointed attorney.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2005 | From Reuters
Federal investigators questioned Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley for about two hours Friday about the city's hiring policies, amid a corruption investigation. Daley announced that he was questioned by investigators from U.S. Atty. Patrick Fitzgerald's office and that he cooperated. Also on hand for the questioning were the city's corporation counsel and Daley's personal attorney. Fitzgerald's spokesman had no comment.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Mayor Richard Daley proposed Thursday to turn municipal hiring over to an independent commission after federal investigators charged two city officials with illegally lining up jobs for people with political connections. The proposed Public Service Commission would set up its own procedures for testing, interviewing and hiring applicants, Daley said. The proposal is subject to approval from the City Council. "This represents progress in the city of Chicago," the mayor said.
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