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OPINION
March 6, 2013
Re "Another Watergate gap," Opinion, March 1 UC Irvine history professor Jon Wiener is right to question the absence of leadership and oversight by the National Archives in its direction of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. That said, I recall the remarks by President Clinton, who eulogized Richard M. Nixon at his funeral on April 27, 1994: "Today is a day for his family, his friends and his nation to remember President Nixon's life in totality. To them, let us say, may the day of judging President Nixon on anything less than his entire life and career come to a close.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1991 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not have been a holiday officially designed to honor Richard M. Nixon, but hundreds of visitors spent Presidents' Day at his presidential library and birthplace here. Although library officials declined to release figures, spokesman Kevin Cartwright said attendance was up by about 20% over an average Monday and that even Saturday's and Sunday's crowds were about 20% larger than usual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
White House tapes released Tuesday capture Richard Nixon as a pugnacious second-term president who talks of hammering out an end to the Vietnam War even if he has to "cut off the head" of the South Vietnamese leader, remarks that an abortion might be necessary if a pregnancy involved an interracial couple and appears preoccupied with savaging his political foes. As Nixon was negotiating an end to U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an opportunity not to be missed. I was a 23-year-old reporter for the Pasadena (Calif.) Star-News when a restaurant bartender phoned in a tip to the newsroom: Richard Nixon, the Richard Nixon, was at the restaurant, in the city of San Gabriel, having lunch. In those days I was what passed for the paper's politics reporter. And Nixon, who had resigned the presidency 5 1/2 years earlier, was nearly a recluse at his San Clemente estate.
NEWS
April 26, 1994
Richard M. Nixon studied, practiced and embraced foreign policy as much as any American President, and there can be few corners of the world where his name was not known. Nor were there many foreign editorial cartoonists who did not take a swipe at his famous profile. As Dwight D. Eisenhower's vice president, Nixon often made headlines abroad--his motorcade attacked by leftist mobs in Caracas in 1959, his celebrated "kitchen debate" with Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev the same year.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | Associated Press
A House Interior subcommittee approved legislation Thursday to create a national historic site in former President Jimmy Carter's hometown of Plains, Ga. The panel turned aside an Administration proposal to include designation of a national historic site at the Yorba Linda, Calif., birthplace of former President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Former President Richard M. Nixon was reported doing well Tuesday as he recovered from prostate surgery at New York Hospital. Nixon, 74, "underwent an uneventful transurethral resection of the prostate" on Monday, hospital spokeswoman Myrna Manners said in a statement. A spokesman for Nixon said the operation went smoothly and no malignancy was involved.
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
NIXON'S THE ONE: The Bush Administration may send in its biggest gun yet to lobby for the President's Russian aid proposal: former President Richard M. Nixon. Nixon, who has criticized Bush for his hesitancy to aid Russia, has volunteered to go to Capitol Hill to push the bill along. . . . His main target would be Republicans who don't want to look like big spenders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2007 | From the Washington Post
Richard Nixon's personality, as revealed through a series of audiotapes, was as complex and secretive as his political agenda. Filmmaker David Taylor, in preparing a new History Channel documentary that airs at 8 p.m. Thursday, donned headphones to hear "hours and hours" of the recently released tapes, dating back to 1971, from the Oval Office and Camp David. "It allowed me to literally listen to Nixon in his own words," Taylor said. "He was a different person depending on who he was talking to."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Sometime in the very near future, Bill Cowell will hunker down in front of a bulky 25-year-old tape player in a nondescript cubicle at the National Archives, clap on a headset and, guided by codes on a sheet of paper, find a precise spot on a thin, brown ribbon to mark with his grease pencil. Then Cowell will flip a couple of levers, slip the delicate magnetic tape into a small aluminum block and slice away the voice of former President Richard M. Nixon.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Three decades after Watergate, a former top aide to President Nixon now contends that Nixon ordered the break-in that led to his resignation. Jeb Stuart Magruder previously had gone no further than saying that John N. Mitchell, the former attorney general who was running the Nixon reelection campaign in 1972, approved the plan to break into the Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate office building.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
President Nixon had no sinister purpose when he had six microphones installed in his Oval Office desk, the former aide who revealed the existence of the recordings said at a Boston conference on presidential tapes. "It was simply for history," Alexander Butterfield said. The taping of presidential conversations began with Franklin D.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
Richard Nixon, like other presidents, was dogged by perceptions that U.S. policy in the Middle East was biased against Arabs. In papers from his administration released Monday, he denied such a tilt. The long-tangled U.S. effort to broker peace in the region is laid out in a trove of decades-old documents from Nixon's administration that reads like headlines from today.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | SCOTT MARTELLE STUART PFEIFER and JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the eight years since President Richard M. Nixon was laid to rest on a Yorba Linda hillside, his two daughters have been embroiled in a bitter dispute over how best to showcase the legacy of the only man to resign from the U.S. presidency. Now the quiet feud has spilled into open court, as the sisters battle over a $12-million bequest from Nixon's longtime friend, the late Bebe Rebozo. At stake is not just the money, but how Nixon's memory will be preserved.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Howls of denial and disbelief are greeting "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President," a new book that purports to reveal secrets of the Watergate scandal. Chief among the critics is former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein, who with Bob Woodward played a major role in breaking the Watergate story. He said that the claim made in the book, written by Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin, that Alexander M. Haig Jr., once President Richard M.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
On his 80th birthday, Richard M. Nixon confided that it was a day he had been dreading, except when he considered the alternative. "The secret to a long life," he said, is "never look back, look forward. You've got to have something to live for, otherwise you cease to live." The occasion was celebrated at the Richard M.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2001 | FERDINAND LEWIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the musical "1776," the song "Cool, Cool, Considerate Men" depicts Revolutionary War era conservatives as power-hungry wheedlers focused on maintaining wealth. So it's not surprising that then-President Richard Nixon, who saw the show at a special White House performance in 1970, wasn't a big fan of the number. What is surprising is that according to Jack L.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 additional hours of Richard Nixon's historic White House tape-recordings will be offered for sale to the public, his heirs and the National Archives announced Tuesday. Although the so-called Watergate tapes--containing evidence of criminality--were chiefly responsible for Nixon's resignation in August 1974, the new recordings will include much more than the scandal, officials said.
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