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Richard Marx

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November 29, 2012 | By Randall Roberts
One of the great benefits of living in the ever-churning social media era is the seemingly random cycle of familiar names that can rise to the surface at any given moment. Witness the unexpected return Wednesday night of hit-making singer and songwriter Richard Marx. About halfway through Marx's hilariously loose run of tweets , the singer let on that his manager was trying to get a hold of him: " Cell phone just rang. Manager (watching me on Twitter) on caller ID. Me: 'And THIS was the call I was expecting!
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Randall Roberts
One of the great benefits of living in the ever-churning social media era is the seemingly random cycle of familiar names that can rise to the surface at any given moment. Witness the unexpected return Wednesday night of hit-making singer and songwriter Richard Marx. About halfway through Marx's hilariously loose run of tweets , the singer let on that his manager was trying to get a hold of him: " Cell phone just rang. Manager (watching me on Twitter) on caller ID. Me: 'And THIS was the call I was expecting!
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT
"Don't Mean Nothing" is the best Eagles song in years. OK, so Don Henley and Glenn Frey aren't on it, but ex-Eagles Joe Walsh, Randy Meisner and Tim Schmidt are. So is Richard Marx, 24, the singer-songwriter on whose debut album the song appears. This high-flying single, which just barged into the Billboard magazine pop Top 10, has niftily launched his career. Marx is being hailed in some quarters as the pop-rock find-of-the-year--1987's Bruce Hornsby.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Too bad for Richard Marx that he was never part of a supergroup, because a reunion tour would be the perfect place for him right now. A handful of his best songs and biggest hits would be fine in the context of a show propelled by nostalgia and other people's talents. But as the star of a two-hour-plus show--as he was Sunday at the Greek Theatre--he seemed as inconsequential as solo Glenn Frey. After four albums and an impressive list of Top 10 singles, Marx has yet to establish a real identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
Richard Marx has apparently been listening to his critics. At the Greek Theatre on Wednesday, the pabulum-pop rocker had clearly taken measures to stem the disapproval of the elitists who scoff at his art and refuse to take him seriously. His infamous puffy coiffure was fully two inches lower than normal, and all six of his band members--the Hair Club, as he called them--had taller, longer tresses than their leader, doubtlessly to make Marx appear a moderate in the politics of hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Richard Marx can be seen touting the benefits of subscribing to Rolling Stone magazine in a proliferation of cable-TV commercials. Those are the ads in which he says that rock 'n' roll is more than music, it's an attitude. So exactly what kind of "attitude" would we surmise modern rock to have from Marx's representative sample Wednesday at the Greek? For starters. . . . -- Talent and professionalism .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pop singer Richard Marx was scheduled to board a plane this morning in Baltimore to fly across the country. Nothing unusual there; pop stars are frequent flyers nonpareil. But before stepping on the MGM Grand jet, Marx was to perform a concert at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and by the time he gets home in the San Fernando Valley tonight he will have performed four more shows--at New York's JFK, then in Cleveland, Chicago and finally Burbank.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Richard Marx leaned his head over the West Hollywood restaurant table and poked his fingers into the top of his notoriously lush mane. "You can see right here, I have no hair spray," the pop singer said. "I don't ever use hair spray. I just have thick hair, which I think (upsets) a lot of bald critics." Hair and critics are two things that often come to mind concerning Richard Marx--and he's proven touchy on both subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
It's a wide line that separates pop craft and inspiration--the difference between, say, Billy Joel and Don Henley--and Richard Marx is stuck on the wrong side. The young pop-rock songwriter, who headlined the Greek Theatre on Saturday night, demonstrates the hit-making instincts of Joel, but little of the revelation or original vision of Henley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1994 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
** Richard Marx, "Paid Vacation," Capitol. Remember Player? The Sanford/Townsend Band? Well, Richard Marx does, along with, in his better moments, the late-era Raspberries. His fourth album, made with his usual stable of collaborators, is a combination of the sort of pasty rock made by these '70s forebears and some schlocky ballads that are produced prettily enough to be memorable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1994 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
** Richard Marx, "Paid Vacation," Capitol. Remember Player? The Sanford/Townsend Band? Well, Richard Marx does, along with, in his better moments, the late-era Raspberries. His fourth album, made with his usual stable of collaborators, is a combination of the sort of pasty rock made by these '70s forebears and some schlocky ballads that are produced prettily enough to be memorable.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
Richard Marx has apparently been listening to his critics. At the Greek Theatre on Wednesday, the pabulum-pop rocker had clearly taken measures to stem the disapproval of the elitists who scoff at his art and refuse to take him seriously. His infamous puffy coiffure was fully two inches lower than normal, and all six of his band members--the Hair Club, as he called them--had taller, longer tresses than their leader, doubtlessly to make Marx appear a moderate in the politics of hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pop singer Richard Marx was scheduled to board a plane this morning in Baltimore to fly across the country. Nothing unusual there; pop stars are frequent flyers nonpareil. But before stepping on the MGM Grand jet, Marx was to perform a concert at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and by the time he gets home in the San Fernando Valley tonight he will have performed four more shows--at New York's JFK, then in Cleveland, Chicago and finally Burbank.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rushing About: Capitol recording artist Richard Marx is taking the title of his new album--"Rush-In, Rush-Out, Rush Street Tour"--to heart. Marx will be rushing across the country Nov. 9, performing five concerts in five cities in the course of that one day. Marx and his band will fly into Washington/Baltimore, New York, Cleveland, Chicago and Los Angeles, performing a free live concert at each stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rushing About: Capitol recording artist Richard Marx is taking the title of his new album--"Rush-In, Rush-Out, Rush Street Tour"--to heart. Marx will be rushing across the country Nov. 9, performing five concerts in five cities in the course of that one day. Marx and his band will fly into Washington/Baltimore, New York, Cleveland, Chicago and Los Angeles, performing a free live concert at each stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990
I don't know what's funnier, Richard Marx thinking critics don't like him because of his hair or Hilburn doing a whole article on people like Marx griping about why people like Hilburn don't like him. Lighten up, guys! Ninety-nine percent of rock critics are a curiosity, nothing more. A sensible person gives no more thought to one of these scribblers than he would a television critic, a sportswriter or Geraldo. People like Hilburn are useful in gauging what the middle-of-the-road, hip-trendy, radical chic, yuppie crowd is thinking at any particular moment (these are very fickle people)
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