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Richard Matheson

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Author Richard Matheson, who was 87, has died at home. His family announced his passing in a protected Facebook post; the news was shared by publisher Tor/Forge . Matheson's imaginative stories were enticing to Hollywood. His book "I Am Legend" was made into a film, not just once but three separate times. 2007's "I Am Legend," starring Will Smith, was preceded by "The Omega Man" with Charlton Heston in 1971 and "The Last Man on Earth" in 1964 with Vincent Price. Matheson also wrote directly for the screen, penning 16 episodes of "The Twilight Zone" and one of "Star Trek.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Guillermo del Toro is a horror movie fanatic (just ask anyone who has been a guest at his memorabilia-filled home), and that genre love is on full display in the newly released opening sequence for the upcoming "Simpsons" Halloween episode, known as the "Treehouse of Horror XXIV. " The "Pacific Rim" director orchestrated the spooky parody of the show's opening. The episode, which airs Sunday, is longer than usual, and features a who's who of horror's past and present. Del Toro also managed to throw a few references to his own films in there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Science fiction writer Richard Matheson passed away Sunday at age 87. Novelist and writer for film and television, Matheson had a long and storied career that saw him influence multiple generations of writers working in a broad cross-section of genre storytelling. Author Stephen King famously declared Matheson his greatest influence as a writer A broad range of films has been adapted from his works. His novel "I Am Legend" alone provided the basis for the 2007 Will Smith movie of the same name but also 1971's "The Omega Man" with Charlton Heston and 1964's "The Last Man on Earth" with Vincent Price.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Writer Richard Matheson, the prolific author of science fiction, fantasy and horror whose works inspired famous "Twilight Zone" episodes and such movies as "I Am Legend," "The Incredible Shrinking Man" and "Real Steel," sometimes found his inspiration in movies. Watching "Dracula" as a teenager gave him the idea for "I Am Legend," the 1954 novel about the last man standing against the vampiric hordes. It was adapted three times, most recently in the 2007 movie of the same title that starred Will Smith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In one of writer Richard Matheson's last novels, when a radio psychologist complains that the woman his wife had just turned away from their door was "terribly disturbed," his wife retorts, "Aren't we all?" That question was central in Matheson's imagination, where the line between normal and out of this world was frighteningly fine. His stories and novels - including "I Am Legend" and "The Shrinking Man" - take place in the so-called real world, but the inexplicable abounds. The dark space under a couch is a passageway to an alien realm, a truck on a lonely road is possessed by evil, a telephone rings with a dead man's voice.
BOOKS
July 31, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is at work on a book about the biblical book of Revelation and its role in American politics and popular culture.
Richard MATHESON is one of the grand masters of the suspense, terror and science-fiction genres, a fact that is best evidenced by the praise so readily and so ardently bestowed by far more famous authors such as Ray Bradbury and Stephen King. Born in 1926, Matheson has been a toiler in the vineyards of the entertainment industry for half a century. Matheson, for example, wrote the scripts for some of the earliest and most memorable episodes of "The Twilight Zone."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Terror comes in many forms. Ever since he started writing for sci-fi magazines and for "The Twilight Zone," Richard Matheson has been giving readers a grand tour in the gardens of menace. No one is safe. Not just the nervous passenger who sees a monster on the wing of his airplane ("Nightmare at 20,000 Feet"), but also the lonely commuter being chased by a truck ("Duel") or a skeptic who hears eerie voices ("A Stir of Echoes"). In "Other Kingdoms" (Tor: 316 pp., $24.99)
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Masello, Special to The Times
Some of the scariest people on the planet live in L.A. And no, I don't mean the trophy wife at the next table with lips the size of futons, or the kid you passed on Melrose covered with more tattoos than Dennis Rodman I mean the people who write the books and stories that send chills down your spine or persuade you to sleep with the lights on.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Guillermo del Toro is a horror movie fanatic (just ask anyone who has been a guest at his memorabilia-filled home), and that genre love is on full display in the newly released opening sequence for the upcoming "Simpsons" Halloween episode, known as the "Treehouse of Horror XXIV. " The "Pacific Rim" director orchestrated the spooky parody of the show's opening. The episode, which airs Sunday, is longer than usual, and features a who's who of horror's past and present. Del Toro also managed to throw a few references to his own films in there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Writer Richard Matheson, the prolific author of science fiction, fantasy and horror whose works inspired famous "Twilight Zone" episodes and such movies as "I Am Legend," "The Incredible Shrinking Man" and "Real Steel," sometimes found his inspiration in movies. Watching "Dracula" as a teenager gave him the idea for "I Am Legend," the 1954 novel about the last man standing against the vampiric hordes. It was adapted three times, most recently in the 2007 movie of the same title that starred Will Smith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In one of writer Richard Matheson's last novels, when a radio psychologist complains that the woman his wife had just turned away from their door was "terribly disturbed," his wife retorts, "Aren't we all?" That question was central in Matheson's imagination, where the line between normal and out of this world was frighteningly fine. His stories and novels - including "I Am Legend" and "The Shrinking Man" - take place in the so-called real world, but the inexplicable abounds. The dark space under a couch is a passageway to an alien realm, a truck on a lonely road is possessed by evil, a telephone rings with a dead man's voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Science fiction writer Richard Matheson passed away Sunday at age 87. Novelist and writer for film and television, Matheson had a long and storied career that saw him influence multiple generations of writers working in a broad cross-section of genre storytelling. Author Stephen King famously declared Matheson his greatest influence as a writer A broad range of films has been adapted from his works. His novel "I Am Legend" alone provided the basis for the 2007 Will Smith movie of the same name but also 1971's "The Omega Man" with Charlton Heston and 1964's "The Last Man on Earth" with Vincent Price.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Author Richard Matheson, who was 87, has died at home. His family announced his passing in a protected Facebook post; the news was shared by publisher Tor/Forge . Matheson's imaginative stories were enticing to Hollywood. His book "I Am Legend" was made into a film, not just once but three separate times. 2007's "I Am Legend," starring Will Smith, was preceded by "The Omega Man" with Charlton Heston in 1971 and "The Last Man on Earth" in 1964 with Vincent Price. Matheson also wrote directly for the screen, penning 16 episodes of "The Twilight Zone" and one of "Star Trek.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Terror comes in many forms. Ever since he started writing for sci-fi magazines and for "The Twilight Zone," Richard Matheson has been giving readers a grand tour in the gardens of menace. No one is safe. Not just the nervous passenger who sees a monster on the wing of his airplane ("Nightmare at 20,000 Feet"), but also the lonely commuter being chased by a truck ("Duel") or a skeptic who hears eerie voices ("A Stir of Echoes"). In "Other Kingdoms" (Tor: 316 pp., $24.99)
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Dick Lochte is a novelist living in Santa Monica. His most recent book, written with Christopher Darden, is "Lawless" (NAL/Onyx).
"I don't like horror pictures." This shouldn't be unexpected from a kindly looking septuagenarian living peacefully in a hilltop home in a gated Southern California community.
BOOKS
July 31, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is at work on a book about the biblical book of Revelation and its role in American politics and popular culture.
Richard MATHESON is one of the grand masters of the suspense, terror and science-fiction genres, a fact that is best evidenced by the praise so readily and so ardently bestowed by far more famous authors such as Ray Bradbury and Stephen King. Born in 1926, Matheson has been a toiler in the vineyards of the entertainment industry for half a century. Matheson, for example, wrote the scripts for some of the earliest and most memorable episodes of "The Twilight Zone."
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Dick Lochte is a novelist living in Santa Monica. His most recent book, written with Christopher Darden, is "Lawless" (NAL/Onyx).
"I don't like horror pictures." This shouldn't be unexpected from a kindly looking septuagenarian living peacefully in a hilltop home in a gated Southern California community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1998
Why do news accounts of heavy weather invariably anthropomorphize nature with words like: wrath, raging, unforgiving, unrelenting, punishing, brutal, mercilessly, mean, fierce, ferocious, cruel, nasty, furious, violent, etc. I really don't believe that nature bears a personal grudge against us or expresses attitudes, which are uniquely ours. RICHARD MATHESON, Calabasas
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Masello, Special to The Times
Some of the scariest people on the planet live in L.A. And no, I don't mean the trophy wife at the next table with lips the size of futons, or the kid you passed on Melrose covered with more tattoos than Dennis Rodman I mean the people who write the books and stories that send chills down your spine or persuade you to sleep with the lights on.
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