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Richard Mcwilliams

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SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | JIM COLONNA
In the face of concern about a saturation of baseball cards on the marketplace, stands the new kid on the block, Upper Deck, and its president, Richard McWilliams. Upper Deck began printing cards last season. "When we opened, I had 20 employees and 25,000 square feet of space," McWilliams said. "Now we have more than 360 employees and need 80,000 square feet. Right now we are in three locations. That's why we're moving to Carlsbad next year."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Richard McWilliam, hailed for revolutionizing the trading card and sports memorabilia industry as a co-founder and chief executive officer of Carlsbad-based Upper Deck Co., has died. He was 59. McWilliam died Saturday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe. While no cause of death has been announced, the company noted that McWilliam had a history of heart disease and had undergone heart surgery in 2008. McWilliam co-founded Upper Deck in 1989 and immediately set about challenging the leaders of an industry whose origins date to the late 19th century, when cards with pictures of baseball players were sold in packs of chewing tobacco.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Richard McWilliam, hailed for revolutionizing the trading card and sports memorabilia industry as a co-founder and chief executive officer of Carlsbad-based Upper Deck Co., has died. He was 59. McWilliam died Saturday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe. While no cause of death has been announced, the company noted that McWilliam had a history of heart disease and had undergone heart surgery in 2008. McWilliam co-founded Upper Deck in 1989 and immediately set about challenging the leaders of an industry whose origins date to the late 19th century, when cards with pictures of baseball players were sold in packs of chewing tobacco.
SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | JIM COLONNA
In the face of concern about a saturation of baseball cards on the marketplace, stands the new kid on the block, Upper Deck, and its president, Richard McWilliams. Upper Deck began printing cards last season. "When we opened, I had 20 employees and 25,000 square feet of space," McWilliams said. "Now we have more than 360 employees and need 80,000 square feet. Right now we are in three locations. That's why we're moving to Carlsbad next year."
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Padres star Tony Gwynn was making an appearance at the team's gift store in a suburban shopping center when he noticed something wrong: a baseball with his name scrawled on it. A perfectionist on the field and off, Gwynn was annoyed that the signature in the display window at the Encinitas store was sloppy and nearly unreadable. Not to mention fake. "That really fried me," the future Hall of Fame right fielder said Wednesday. "I take some pride in making my signature legible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1988 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
It was certainly a partisan crowd, but then again, Jerry was telling that same crowd that the word "partisan" sounded negative these days, although it really shouldn't. And since this did seem to be Jerry's crowd, maybe Jerry wouldn't have described them that way, negatively that is. But these were Democrats in Orange County, who are not only partisan but almost clannish, outnumbered as they are by others of a different political persuasion.
SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eight years ago, Michael Klar began amassing Brooklyn Dodger collectibles, vintage 1947 to 1957. First came autographed baseballs, then bats, uniforms, jerseys, rings, yearbooks, programs, ads and statues. A former minor leaguer sold the Long Island lawyer Jackie Robinson's 1950 home jersey. Andy Pafko sold him his uniform. Klar bought Duke Snider's 1953 league championship ring so Snider could buy his wife diamond earrings.
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