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Richard Meier

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NEWS
April 12, 1985
The architect as a superstar. It's not a new phenomenon, but the list keeps growing and the latest addition is 50-year-old Richard Meier, winner of the 1984 Pritzker Prize (it's considered architecture's version of the Nobel), designer of Atlanta's High Museum of Art and winner of the architectural plum of the decade--architect for the multimillion-dollar J. Paul Getty Trust arts complex that will rise over many acres in Brentwood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2009 | David Ng
The converted storefront that serves as the West Coast headquarters for Larry Gagosian's art empire is about to get a serious expansion. Richard Meier's architecture firm said Monday it is working on the designs for the expanded Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills. The space, on Camden Drive near Santa Monica Boulevard, will nearly double in size to 11,600 square feet. The project is led by architect Michael Palladino, who originally oversaw the opening of the gallery in 1995. Gagosian said in a statement that the expansion will "extend through the building directly to the south."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic.
Most people who know of the J. Paul Getty Trust know that it is rich. Immensely rich. With an endowment of $3.2 billion, it is surely the richest private art organization around. Yet, beyond astronomical capital assets, and the wide-eyed envy such sums induce among mere mortals, the difficulty of saying just what else the Getty might be is almost equally immense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Louis Meier, 86, an urban scholar who was a pioneer in the study of sustainable planning for cities, died Feb. 26 of pneumonia and congestive heart failure at Alta Bates Medical Center in Berkeley, UC Berkeley announced Wednesday. For more than 35 years, Meier taught in UC Berkeley departments related to architecture and urban and regional planning. "He was among the first ...
BOOKS
April 7, 1985 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is an author and The Times' urban design critic. and
Whether prompted by a genuine rise in the public's design consciousness, or by their own promotional efforts, a few select architects in these days of arbitrary tastes and shifting styles have become celebrities. Their doodlings prompt auctions; their observations lecture fees; their attendance fawning; their services clients; their designs mimicry, and their completed projects the attention of critics. Three such architect/celebrities are Richard Meier, Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel, with Meier a singular force heading his own design firm and Gwathmey and Siegel melding their talents as partners.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
RICHARD MEIER did not look pleased. Sitting at a corner table in the Getty Center's main restaurant, where he stops off for a meal every time he visits Los Angeles, the white-haired architect was discussing two of his least-favorite topics. The first was the decision by Atlanta's High Museum of Art, which occupies one of Meier's best-known buildings, to hire the Italian architect Renzo Piano to design an extensive new wing that opened last fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2009 | David Ng
The converted storefront that serves as the West Coast headquarters for Larry Gagosian's art empire is about to get a serious expansion. Richard Meier's architecture firm said Monday it is working on the designs for the expanded Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills. The space, on Camden Drive near Santa Monica Boulevard, will nearly double in size to 11,600 square feet. The project is led by architect Michael Palladino, who originally oversaw the opening of the gallery in 1995. Gagosian said in a statement that the expansion will "extend through the building directly to the south."
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999 | Elaine Gale
Sermonizing from a tar-papered pulpit on top of a snack bar at the Orange Drive-In in 1955, the Rev. Robert H. Schuller attracted his first congregants in what would become a spiritual dynasty. He now draws more than 250,000 visitors to his Garden Grove "campus" each year. Besides his high-voltage charisma, Schuller's rise to staying power owes much to a fierce entrepreneurial bent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
Several years ago, when architect Richard Meier first saw the massive and shapeless hill in Los Angeles where the new J. Paul Getty Museum, conservation institute, and research and education centers were to be built, he was dumbfounded. "My God," he remembers thinking, "where do you begin?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Richard Meier, the renowned New York-based architect of the lofty $1-billion Getty Center in Brentwood, is shaking up the city's cultural landscape again. UCLA has announced that it has hired Meier & Partners to design a new visual arts building on the site of the current Dickson Art Center, which was damaged during the 1994 Northridge earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
RICHARD MEIER did not look pleased. Sitting at a corner table in the Getty Center's main restaurant, where he stops off for a meal every time he visits Los Angeles, the white-haired architect was discussing two of his least-favorite topics. The first was the decision by Atlanta's High Museum of Art, which occupies one of Meier's best-known buildings, to hire the Italian architect Renzo Piano to design an extensive new wing that opened last fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2005 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
THE Italian architect Renzo Piano is in the process of rewriting the book on American museum architecture. Well, it might be more accurate to say he's rewriting the book on museum expansions: His firm, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, has additions in the works at a remarkable number of the most prominent museums in the country, including the Whitney in New York, the Gardner in Boston and the Art Institute of Chicago.
FOOD
March 19, 2003 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
The frenzy feels almost surreal. By 9 o'clock on a Friday night, heads at Jean-Georges Vongerichten's dramatic new restaurant are swiveling as subtly as the Lazy Susans on the bigger tables. There's Tony Roberts on his way out, and Woody Allen just sitting down. In another corner, Vogue's omnivorous food columnist Jeffrey Steingarten is ensconced with an entourage headed by Gourmet's unmistakable editor, Ruth Reichl.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
It may be hard to believe for those who like government buildings decoratedwith granite staircases and marble colonnades, but the most beautiful courthouse built in America in years is a work as sleek and modern as a Swiss watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Richard Meier, the renowned New York-based architect of the lofty $1-billion Getty Center in Brentwood, is shaking up the city's cultural landscape again. UCLA has announced that it has hired Meier & Partners to design a new visual arts building on the site of the current Dickson Art Center, which was damaged during the 1994 Northridge earthquake.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999 | Elaine Gale
Sermonizing from a tar-papered pulpit on top of a snack bar at the Orange Drive-In in 1955, the Rev. Robert H. Schuller attracted his first congregants in what would become a spiritual dynasty. He now draws more than 250,000 visitors to his Garden Grove "campus" each year. Besides his high-voltage charisma, Schuller's rise to staying power owes much to a fierce entrepreneurial bent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The J. Paul Getty Trust on Wednesday unveiled architectural plans for its $360-million Getty Center in Brentwood--a project far larger, later and more expensive than originally anticipated.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Richard Meier sits at a white lacquered table in a light-filled office in Westwood with unadorned white walls. His white shirt matches his collar-length white hair. The bookshelves and telephone are white, as is the single carnation peeking out from a bud vase. Perhaps the world's leading architect, Meier is--not surprisingly--famous for gleaming white buildings covered with porcelain panels. He is also celebrated for making light bend in unusual and interesting ways, for structures that appear to have been dropped from a helicopter into the surrounding landscape and for a formal approach that has won him many more admirers in Europe than in California.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1997 | STEVE PROFFITT, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to The Times' Sunday Opinion section, is director of the JSM New Media Lab, the interactive arm of JSM+ Communications, a Los Angeles-based advertising agency
At the highly guarded Getty Center, Richard Meier doesn't have a security pass. These days, with the museum about to open and a legion of recently hired sentries in place, he has to literally sneak around the site, relying on the recognition by old hands and talking his way past checkpoints. This is a bittersweet time for the architect. In the 13 years since he was awarded the job of creating the $1-billion Getty Center, the project has been the focus of his life.
OPINION
October 5, 1997 | Anthony Vidler, Anthony Vidler, an architectural historian who has taught at UCLA, is now dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University. His most recent book is "The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely."
A recent issue of a national magazine cites an exchange between a local billionaire and the director of the Getty Museum during a tour of the new Getty Center in Brentwood, designed by architect Richard Meier. "This is too good for Los Angeles" the billionaire was reported as saying, finding the building complex somehow too solid and permanent to be appreciated in a city that is only "transitory."
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