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Richard Mell

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Mary Tyler Moore's new CBS sitcom, once set in a fictional, third-rate newspaper called the Chicago Post, will premiere as scheduled Wednesday--but with all references to the Post deleted, a spokesman for her production company said Monday. The action was taken after the co-owners of a monthly newspaper called the Chicago Post took legal action against MTM Enterprises Inc., maker of Moore's new "Mary," for allegedly using the paper's name without permission.
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NATIONAL
December 11, 2008 | Stacy St. Clair, St. Clair writes for the Chicago Tribune.
An unflattering portrait depicting Illinois first lady Patricia Blagojevich as a modern-day Lady Macbeth who plotted against her husband's perceived enemies and backed his corrupt schemes emerged in court documents connected to the governor's arrest. Her alleged ambitions and brashness are outlined in a 76-page federal criminal complaint: She helped her husband hatch a plan to sell President-elect Barack Obama's former U.S. Senate seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
In her new CBS comedy series, "Mary," Mary Tyler Moore plays a "helpline" columnist at a make-believe, third-rate newspaper, the Chicago Post. It is not known if she has yet received an irate letter from Richard Mell, vice mayor of Chicago. But her production company and CBS have, at least from Mell's lawyer, warning them to "cease and desist" using the name of the Chicago Post in the program or face legal action.
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
This city dressed its Thanksgiving in black crepe, eulogies and political intrigue Thursday as government leaders publicly mourned the late Mayor Harold Washington, who suffered a fatal heart attack Wednesday, but privately began jockeying to replace him. Alderman David Orr, vice mayor under Washington, was sworn in as interim mayor in a private City Hall ceremony.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Andrew McKenna Jr. stands before a tense crowd and prepares his plea. The audience, like the ones at four other local events he has faced in the last 36 hours, has gathered to celebrate Abraham Lincoln's birthday. McKenna, however, is here for one reason. He is here to rebuild an organization that has become so troubled that many people consider it politically irrelevant: the Republican Party in Illinois. A former governor faces federal corruption and racketeering charges.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2002 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
For more than a quarter century, conservative residents of rural and suburban Illinois have helped check the influence of the nation's most famously Democratic city with a brilliantly simple, if not necessarily easy, maneuver: they have elected a Republican governor every four years. Since 1976, Illinois has had a de facto system of checks and balances, with conservatives holding the governor's mansion and liberals in charge in the nation's third largest city.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2006 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
In the buildup to today's Republican primary election for governor in Illinois, it has been all but impossible to ignore the campaign bluster over the George H. Ryan factor. Judy Baar Topinka, the state treasurer and onetime leader of the Illinois Republican Party, is leading the polls in the five-way fight and is seen as the party's best chance to unseat incumbent Democrat Rod Blagojevich.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man would have approved. All summer long, the city that was once the personal fief of the late Mayor Richard J. Daley has undergone a personality transplant, courtesy of Mayor Richard M. Daley. Just as his father did 28 summers ago, when he ordered crews to swab vacant lots with fresh paint, the son has mobilized an army of municipal workers to transform Chicago's blunt cityscape into a garden paradise.
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