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Richard Milanovich

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012
Richard Milanovich, who spent nearly three decades as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, will be honored Wednesday at the Palm Springs Convention Center, 277 N. Avenida Caballeros. A remembrance ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and will be followed by a celebration of his life at noon. His body will lie in repose at the Convention Center, which will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012
Richard Milanovich, who spent nearly three decades as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, will be honored Wednesday at the Palm Springs Convention Center, 277 N. Avenida Caballeros. A remembrance ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and will be followed by a celebration of his life at noon. His body will lie in repose at the Convention Center, which will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Richard Milanovich, who as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians helped to usher in a new age of wealth and political muscle for many Native Americans through the expansion of tribal casinos in California, died Sunday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. He was 69 and had cancer. During Milanovich's nearly three decades as chairman, the Agua Caliente tribe rose from a harsh desert existence to the glitz and riches that accompany casino-fed wealth. The transformation coincided with the rebirth of Palm Springs, home to one of the tribe's two posh casino resorts and large swaths of tribal land, and economic gains across the checkerboard reservations in the Coachella Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Richard Milanovich, who as chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians helped to usher in a new age of wealth and political muscle for many Native Americans through the expansion of tribal casinos in California, died Sunday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. He was 69 and had cancer. During Milanovich's nearly three decades as chairman, the Agua Caliente tribe rose from a harsh desert existence to the glitz and riches that accompany casino-fed wealth. The transformation coincided with the rebirth of Palm Springs, home to one of the tribe's two posh casino resorts and large swaths of tribal land, and economic gains across the checkerboard reservations in the Coachella Valley.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine explored the future of Las Vegas
Richard Milanovich, who doesn't like to gamble because he doesn't like losing money, grins broadly from the podium at the Spa Hotel and Casino in downtown Palm Springs as he gives away a million dollars of the casino's gambling profits. "Oh, this is so much fun," he says, announcing a $150,000 donation to the Palm Springs Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A day after five tribes sued to head off a proposed ballot initiative that could break their state monopoly on slot machines, a Palm Springs tribe that owns two casinos also filed a suit to block the measure. Richard Milanovich, chairman of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, filed the suit Wednesday in the state court of appeals in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
October 28, 1986 | United Press International
Gary Pettis of the Angels and Lloyd Moseby of the Toronto Blue Jays were slightly injured Monday after making a wrong turn during a road rally and getting into a fight with several Indians, who said the players were trespassing on their Pow Wow Grounds, authorities said. Several Indians told the players they were on private property that was off limits under the tribe's agreement with the rally sponsors, Agua Caliente Tribal Chairman Richard Milanovich said.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
They are the latest trend in political speech, billboards up and down the state thanking state legislators for their support. "I was just as surprised as anyone to see it," said Assemblyman Jim Battin (R-La Quinta), whose face is plastered on a billboard that sits in the heart of his Palm Springs-area district. "I started hearing from a bunch of other legislators that they got billboards just like it in their districts."
NEWS
December 10, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stymied in its efforts to construct a $25-million downtown casino, the Agua Caliente Indians announced plans Friday to open a smaller card club at their Spa Hotel and bring gambling to the desert resort town by April. * The card club, to be in a 9,000-square-foot convention room at the 240-room downtown hotel, will provide the tribe with an immediate source of new income, tribal Chairman Richard Milanovich said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of low-income gambling employees, union leaders and clergy protested the lack of affordable family insurance Tuesday at the Spa and Agua Caliente Casinos, run by one of the state's most prosperous Indian tribes. The event was part of an ongoing effort by the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union to organize workers at the two Coachella Valley casinos operated by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for the magazine explored the future of Las Vegas
Richard Milanovich, who doesn't like to gamble because he doesn't like losing money, grins broadly from the podium at the Spa Hotel and Casino in downtown Palm Springs as he gives away a million dollars of the casino's gambling profits. "Oh, this is so much fun," he says, announcing a $150,000 donation to the Palm Springs Fire Department.
OPINION
September 19, 2008
Re "Stacked deck," editorial, Sept. 15 The Times' editorial too hastily criticizes the Legislature's effort to rein in the growing industry of unregulated charity casino bingo. The editorial failed to mention that operators of these machines are not currently subject to any regulatory oversight, nor is there any requirement to pay the charities a reasonable percentage of their income. The California attorney general said in May that these electronic bingo devices are unlawful under the California Penal Code and no longer should be used.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A mile under a desert mountain near here, scientists envision a labyrinth of underground laboratories, cryogenic chambers and water-filled caverns fitted with devices that can detect some of the rarest matter in the universe. Mt. San Jacinto is one of four sites under consideration for what would be the first underground laboratory of its kind in the nation, and one of a handful in the world.
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