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Richard Miller

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NEWS
December 1, 1989
Richard Miller, a Los Angeles businessman who began supporting Cedars-Sinai Medical Center when it existed as Mt. Sinai Clinic in Boyle Heights in 1939 and was deeply involved in a support group that has raised more than $6 million for that hospital over the years, died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 78 and died of complications from leukemia. Born in New York, Miller came to Los Angeles as a boy and studied accounting.
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HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Woolston
Now that people in Colorado (and, soon, Washington state) can buy marijuana about as easily as they can pick up a 12-pack of Bud Light, it's a good time to ask: How risky is it to turn to pot? President Obama has already shared his opinion, telling the New Yorker magazine, "I don't think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol. " The president's opinion stands in stark contrast with official federal policy that still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same class as heroin and LSD. In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Lynell George
Imagine Los Angeles as an unfinished sentence: big, open fields; no homes or other clutter hugging the Pacific; dirt roads from downtown to Pasadena. To see Los Angeles, before its superstructure of freeways and sweeping transition roads, summons up a different sort of narrative. Richard C. Miller was there to watch L.A. transform, and lucky for us he carried his camera with him -- either a 35-millimeter or a 4-by-5. He took long drives at night to clear his head, wandered out to the edge of settled L.A. and brought back tens of thousands of images of street corners, stop signs, old traffic lights, parking lots, gas stations, dirt roads, open fields -- unfolding, rolling space where now a grown-up city crowds together.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage, betrayed his country by passing secret documents to his Soviet lover out of lust and "to make a quick buck," a prosecutor said today. "He did not begin his (FBI) career to become a spy. But he did become a spy," Assistant U.S. Atty. Adam Schiff said in opening Miller's third trial on espionage and bribery charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday barred government efforts to deport two convicted Soviet spys, clearing the way for them to testify in the upcoming retrial of Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi ruled that Miller has a right to call Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai, as witnesses in his third trial in April, 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his toweringly tragic "Long Day's Journey Into Night," Eugene O'Neill painted a truthful portrait of his family. But he wanted his family to have been like the one in "Ah, Wilderness!" A nostalgic, dreamy comedy, a kind of wish-fulfillment of the youth he never had, "Ah, Wilderness!" is about a family idealized for any era, close to perfect, sort of a precursor of Andy Hardy's in the classic MGM series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1985
Attorneys in the spy trial of former FBI agent Richard Miller spent a fourth day Monday locked in disagreement over the wording of jury instructions. The four lawyers met with U.S. District Judge David Kenyon, who opened his courtroom for a special Columbus Day session in an effort to smooth out their differences. Kenyon, sensing the process would take longer than anticipated, reluctantly agreed last week to postpone closing arguments until jury instructions were "ironed out."
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the stories of two Irvine families who have a personal stake in helping their community's schools weather the county's bankruptcy. They spoke with Times staff writer Ching-Ching Ni. The Millers, Donna and Richard, were happy parents grateful to be raising their 8- and 2-year-old daughters in a community with such highly touted public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
His voice rising in anger near the close of the Richard W. Miller spy trial, a federal prosecutor charged Wednesday that the former counterintelligence agent had disgraced himself and permanently stained the reputation of the FBI by passing a secret document to the Soviet Union. U.S. Atty. Robert C.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Even behind the dignified fringe of white beard, Richard C. Miller seems astonished about all the fuss. In his spacious living room in Calabasas overlooking a sweep of hills, fragrant scrub and what's left of wild L.A., friends and visiting family members buzz about. There's a digital audio recorder placed on the dining room table that runs continuously, and so too does a video camera, recording the 95-year-old's slightest gesture, hoping to catch one more unearthed thought or anecdote.
BOOKS
October 5, 2003 | Robert Winter, Robert Winter holds the presidential chair in music and interactive arts at UCLA. Two of his new interactive DVD titles, "Dvorak in America" (with Joseph Horowitz) and "Performing the Bartok Quartets" (with the Emerson Quartet), will appear in early 2004.
"THROUGH music he could create impregnable, unified structures; describe endless forms of transcendence over hostile energies; inscribe narratives of return, refinding, and rebeginning; forge a channel between himself and a forbearing deity; invoke the healing powers of music." So Maynard Solomon (inventing a few words along the way) characterizes Beethoven's creative quest in the prologue to his magisterial collection of 12 essays exploring new facets of Beethoven's late style.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scenic designer Paul R. DeDoes' set for Chapman University's revival of Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness" is barren, drab and bleak. It's a more fitting framework for his "Long Day's Journey Into Night" because, though O'Neill's design description for the two plays is identical, "Journey" is about despair and desperation, while "Wilderness" is a comedy of wishful thinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the stories of two Irvine families who have a personal stake in helping their community's schools weather the county's bankruptcy. They spoke with Times staff writer Ching-Ching Ni. The Millers, Donna and Richard, were happy parents grateful to be raising their 8- and 2-year-old daughters in a community with such highly touted public schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his toweringly tragic "Long Day's Journey Into Night," Eugene O'Neill painted a truthful portrait of his family. But he wanted his family to have been like the one in "Ah, Wilderness!" A nostalgic, dreamy comedy, a kind of wish-fulfillment of the youth he never had, "Ah, Wilderness!" is about a family idealized for any era, close to perfect, sort of a precursor of Andy Hardy's in the classic MGM series.
HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Woolston
Now that people in Colorado (and, soon, Washington state) can buy marijuana about as easily as they can pick up a 12-pack of Bud Light, it's a good time to ask: How risky is it to turn to pot? President Obama has already shared his opinion, telling the New Yorker magazine, "I don't think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol. " The president's opinion stands in stark contrast with official federal policy that still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same class as heroin and LSD. In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.
NEWS
September 19, 1985 | LINDA DEUTSCH, Associated Press Writer
The first defense witness at Richard W. Miller's spy trial admitted Wednesday that he paid the ex-FBI agent $1,000 for official information and Miller sometimes paid him as an FBI informant. The statements from Lawrence Grayson in Los Angeles federal court were elicited by prosecutors to challenge the credibility of his earlier testimony in Miller's behalf. U.S.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage, betrayed his country by passing secret documents to his Soviet lover out of lust and "to make a quick buck," a prosecutor said today. "He did not begin his (FBI) career to become a spy. But he did become a spy," Assistant U.S. Atty. Adam Schiff said in opening Miller's third trial on espionage and bribery charges.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard W. Miller, president of Wang Laboratories Inc., has been named the company's new chairman and chief executive, succeeding the computer maker's founder, An Wang, who died of cancer last weekend. The directors' action was expected by analysts, who noted that Miller already assumed much of the leadership last year when he was named president. "(Miller) basically has the future of the company on his shoulders," said George Elling, an analyst with Merrill Lynch & Co.
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